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-   -   Anyone grown Rugosa Friulana? (http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=42791)

gorbelly September 23, 2016 04:00 PM

Anyone grown Rugosa Friulana?
 
I was surprised to learn that RF is a moschata, which would suggest good SVB and squash bug resistance. Is that consistent with your experiences?

Also, I can't seem to find a clear description of the growth habit. Does it grow on long vines like other moschatas? How long?

I have family members who are fond of crooknecks, but I find them a bit watery and bland, and they're especially attractive to pests from what I understand. Seems like this would be a good compromise, as it's supposed to be firmer with stronger flavor (seems like this is true of most Italian varieties), and if consistent with other moschatas, it should have more resistance to pests.

gorbelly September 24, 2016 02:09 PM

It seems the article that identified it as a moschata is probably wrong. Other sources identify it as a pepo, which makes more sense, and I have found YouTube video that indicates that it's a bush habit.

I'm still attracted by the promise of more flavor than most summer squash, though, and would love to get any personal anecdotes about that.

Fred Hempel September 24, 2016 02:43 PM

The chefs we sell to want 1 summer squash from us -- Butternut Rugosa.

We sell it as both a summer squash and a winter squash.

It is 90% of the squash we grow, and it makes life simpler.

Butternut rugosa is a moschata, and it sounds like some people are confusing butternut rugosa with rugosa fruliana.

gorbelly September 24, 2016 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fred Hempel (Post 593677)
The chefs we sell to want 1 summer squash from us -- Butternut Rugosa.

That one is a strong possibility for my growlist for next year, although, as indicated in this thread, I'm trying to decide between it and Greek Sweet Red. I'm a huge fan of Franchi seed, though. I planted 2 Franchi varieties this year, the big red pear tomato and their tromboncino. I seem to get many times more robust production from mine than from seed of similar varieties from the various well-regarded heirloom seed sources.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fred Hempel (Post 593677)
We sell it as both a summer squash and a winter squash.

Oooo. What does the Italian Rugosa Butternut taste like as a summer squash?? At what size do you pick it? I know that all winter squashes can be picked and eaten immature, but many don't have the production and flavor to really serve as summer squash crops. If Butternut Rugosa is an exception, I will be thrilled!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fred Hempel (Post 593677)
Butternut rugosa is a moschata, and it sounds like some people are confusing butternut rugosa with rugosa fruliana.

Aah, that makes perfect sense. Thanks, Fred. You always give good feedback.

Fred Hempel September 24, 2016 03:17 PM

Butternut rugosa is an exception. It's flavor is much cleaner than zucchini and it is great for raw preparations.

We pick it at all green sizes from 6 inches up to full size. Different chefs like different immature stages.

Our main problem right now is that our "summer squash" sales of Butternut Rugosa have reduced our winter squash production.

gorbelly September 24, 2016 03:23 PM

Fred, what do you mean by "cleaner"? I actually like a summer squash with some squashy funk and nuttiness to it. The ones that have a more cucumbery, fresh flavor strike me as a bit bland.

It seems like a lot of people don't actually like the flavor of summer squash and therefore rate more highly the varieties that are sweet and relatively flavorless. That's not what I'm looking for, as I do actively enjoy the taste of summer squash and like more robust flavored ones. Sweet is good, but a good nuttiness and "squashiness" for lack of a better word is better than a lighter flavor to me.

Fred Hempel September 24, 2016 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gorbelly (Post 593685)
Fred, what do you mean by "cleaner"? I actually like a summer squash with some squashy funk and nuttiness to it. The ones that have a more cucumbery, fresh flavor strike me as a bit bland.

It seems like a lot of people don't actually like the flavor of summer squash and therefore rate more highly the varieties that are sweet and relatively flavorless. That's not what I'm looking for, as I do actively enjoy the taste of summer squash and like more robust flavored ones. Sweet is good, but a good nuttiness and "squashiness" for lack of a better word is better than a lighter flavor to me.

Clean = no chalkiness/bitterness when eaten raw.

But Butternut Rugosa does have a robust, and deep flavor. Just without the annoying chalkiness.

gorbelly September 24, 2016 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fred Hempel (Post 593699)
Clean = no chalkiness/bitterness when eaten raw.

But Butternut Rugosa does have a robust, and deep flavor. Just without the annoying chalkiness.

Sounds perfect! I think I'll try it next year as a summer squash, and maybe as a winter squash as well. How much production on average do you estimate per vine as a summer squash? I will almost certainly purchase the Franchi seed, which I believe you also recommend.

Fred Hempel September 24, 2016 04:57 PM

Have had consistently good luck with Franchi seed -- and the Euro pack sizes are a bonus.

We probably get 50-100 lbs per vine, in a field (farm) situation.

I'm not the best farmer, though. I bet others could get more.

Quote:

Originally Posted by gorbelly (Post 593702)
Sounds perfect! I think I'll try it next year as a summer squash, and maybe as a winter squash as well. How much production on average do you estimate per vine as a summer squash? I will almost certainly purchase the Franchi seed, which I believe you also recommend.


gorbelly September 24, 2016 05:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fred Hempel (Post 593703)
Have had consistently good luck with Franchi seed -- and the Euro pack sizes are a bonus.

Franchi's selection is not large or fashionable, but any time an OP or heirloom variety I want is sold by Franchi, I will buy it from them. I've been impressed by the health and productivity of plants grown from Franchi seed.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fred Hempel (Post 593703)
We probably get 50-100 lbs per vine, in a field (farm) situation.

I'm not the best farmer, though. I bet others could get more.

Well, I will temper my expectations to my experience level and because I will be growing them up a trellis, but even so, it seems like a good bet. I'm already impatient for next year! Thanks for the great info, Fred.

Fred Hempel September 24, 2016 05:14 PM

I would think twice about a trellis, if you want mature fruits. They are typically between 7 and 15 lbs and they would not be easily supported by a trellis.

It would be like growing watermelons on a trellis...

gorbelly September 24, 2016 05:39 PM

Thanks, Fred. Unfortunately, I don't have the space to let them sprawl. I use slings when needed. The supports I use for squash go up a brick wall and aren't flimsy freestanding trellises, and when vines get really rampant, I let them go up onto my garage roof. I'm not going to try to grow any 30 pound pumpkins or anything, but 7-15 # squash should be doable.

Fred Hempel September 24, 2016 08:05 PM

You need a bigger place!

gorbelly October 12, 2016 08:28 PM

FYI, it appears that the rugosa friulana warty yellow crookneck-style summer squash is, indeed, C. moschata. That's how it's labeled on the Franchi website and on the seed packages.

Very interesting. I may have to try one just to see what I get. I've never heard of a bush plant that was a moschata. I guess I'll plant it somewhere it can spread in case it's not a bush plant.

LDiane October 19, 2016 12:48 PM

I bought my seed from Baker Creek which calls it C pepo. I didn't get any squash - deer devoured the plants.


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