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-   -   Starting rosemary from cuttings? (http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=37394)

TexasTycoon July 1, 2015 04:42 PM

Starting rosemary from cuttings?
 
My Gram has a few prolific rosemary bushes (both the bushy variety and the crawling variety) that I would like to start in my own pots from cuttings. I tried once this past spring, with a few cuttings from each plant dipped in rooting hormone and stuck into some peat, but the peat just got moldy and the cuttings died. Is there a trick to rooting rosemary cuttings? My Gram is no help, she says she just stick the cuttings in the ground and they grow. Well, I'm in an apartment and she's got some of the best soil in the state (first thing she did when they moved to Texas 40+ years ago was get her soil tested and start amending it so she could garden), so I'm out of luck. How should I go about it if I'm able to get my hands on some cuttings again?

Labradors2 July 1, 2015 04:55 PM

I cut the sprigs, strip the lower leaves and put them in a container of water. They root easily.

Linda

TexasTycoon July 1, 2015 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Labradors2 (Post 485855)
I cut the sprigs, strip the lower leaves and put them in a container of water. They root easily.

Linda

Does it matter how long of a piece you start with? And do the newer branches/sprigs root easier than the older ones? I read somewhere that they won't root once the stem is woody.

Worth1 July 1, 2015 07:06 PM

Well they will root when the stems are woody.
My huge bushes end up on the ground and root easily.
The things are taking over the place.
They are Tuscan Blue an upright rosemary.
You might try staking the limbs to the ground let them root and dig that section up and plant.
Practically all rosemary are clones from cuttings.
Worth

Labradors2 July 1, 2015 07:11 PM

I cut them about 6" in length.

Worth's idea of pinning the branches to the ground to get them to root is a great one too!

Linda

Cole_Robbie July 2, 2015 02:50 AM

If you ever have trouble rooting cuttings of anything in water, try using a small aquarium air pump to aerate the water. A small water pump will do the same thing. Aerating the water changes the bacterial profile from anaerobic to aerobic. You grow the good guys, and not the bad guys who cause stem rot.

TexasTycoon July 2, 2015 09:44 AM

Thanks for all the advice! A house I used to rent had a huge rosemary bush in the front yard that I used all the time (hellooooooo rosemary garlic baked chicken), so I've really missed having it on hand all the time. Plus, I really want part of my Gram's garden with me. I know I won't have my grandparents around that much longer, and the house/land is going to one of my aunts who lives in San Antonio when they pass. I doubt she'll keep it since she's got a nice house of her own and it's just her. But I digress.

I think I'll try to root some in water next time I can get out there to visit, and if I still can't make that work I'll see if Gram's interested in letting me stake some branches to the ground like Worth suggested.

ScottinAtlanta July 2, 2015 10:33 AM

Worth is right. Root around the bush, and you will find some stems with roots already on them.

TexasTycoon July 2, 2015 11:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScottinAtlanta (Post 486018)
Worth is right. Root around the bush, and you will find some stems with roots already on them.

Good idea. I'll check next time I'm out there.

hoefarmer July 2, 2015 03:00 PM

rosmary
 
If you are going to be near El Campo (in between Houston and Victoria), I have several liners in 2" pots that I could share with you.

clkeiper July 2, 2015 03:26 PM

I have rooted it and it is easier than lavender to root. I use soft cuttings to do mine. I use rooting hormone, covered containers and a heat mat. I mist them every day or two until they are rooted. Some take and some don't. You might also want to change rooting hormones too. Some are suited to soft stem cuttings and some are suited to woodier ones. Check at a garden center for different types (not a big box store center, a real garden center only type place) or look online and order it.

habitat_gardener July 2, 2015 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TexasTycoon (Post 485846)
My Gram has a few prolific rosemary bushes (both the bushy variety and the crawling variety) that I would like to start in my own pots from cuttings. I tried once this past spring, with a few cuttings from each plant dipped in rooting hormone and stuck into some peat, but the peat just got moldy and the cuttings died. ...

Avoid peat! That's the (ahem) root of the problem. Rosemary needs good drainage, and peat does the exact opposite.

I've had good luck rooting rosemary cuttings in garden soil or compost in 1 gallon pots. Strip the foliage from the bottom half of a 6-12 inch cutting and place 4-6 cuttings in a pot. No rooting hormone needed.

Just be sure to keep the cuttings upright (don't lay them horizontally) at all times. As soon as the cutting is made, the hormones that facilitate rooting travel downward (gravity), so to get the max amount of hormones where you want them, you need to have a container ready before you make the cuttings. I went to a talk last year where a greenhouse grower at a university said they were having little luck with a particular plant until they discovered this tip. They had been taking cuttings, laying them on a tray, and then walking across the greenhouse to pot them up. They discovered that if they kept the cuttings upright at all times, instead of laying them on a tray -- even just to walk across the greenhouse -- they had dramatically better success!

kayrobbins July 2, 2015 06:11 PM

I have a friend that is a 78 year old herb farmer. When she is getting ready for her events that are open to the public I spend days helping her get ready. In exchange she gives me herbs, cuttings and has taught me how to root cuttings.

Her method is have the trays ready before taking cuttings. She uses a seed germinating mix (yes, it has peat) but is fine. She packs it very tightly into the cells. Air pockets are the enemy that causes cutting to rot. She does not use any rooting hormone. Cuttings are taking from the tneder shoots and the leaves stripped from the part that will be under the soil. She grows in a green house and keeps them well misted. She also has an outside misting bed that she use if the weather conditions are right.

I don't have a greenhouse so I put my prepared cuttings under the same grow lights I use for vegetable seedlings and mist them daily. Since I started using her methods my success rates have improved dramatically.

Tracydr July 2, 2015 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Labradors2 (Post 485855)
I cut the sprigs, strip the lower leaves and put them in a container of water. They root easily.

Linda

Can I also do this with lavender?

TexasTycoon July 6, 2015 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hoefarmer (Post 486079)
If you are going to be near El Campo (in between Houston and Victoria), I have several liners in 2" pots that I could share with you.

Haha not planning on being in that area anytime soon, but thanks!


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