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-   -   Mycorrhizae..can I get more bang for my $$$? (http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=23126)

Atomic Garden June 2, 2012 01:35 AM

Mycorrhizae..can I get more bang for my $$$?
 
I have asked a few places and I seem to get the same answer. Some version of- I have never thought of that. I currently pay a lot more than I would like to for these products. I started with the liquid. I then read the powder label and it seemed to have more types of beneficial bacteria in it. I mentioned it to my Wife and the next day I get home from work and she had bought me a big tub of it(I think she is awesome! I originally thought she did it because she loves me. I now think she just wants a gazillion cherry tomatoes...hmmm)I now have both. Great, I am excited and rotate between the two. Doesn't change the fact this stuff is pretty expensive for the amount you get. My question is can you increase the amount you get? I have been using compost or worm tea and I know the reason you let it bubble for hours on end is to let the bacteria and fungi grow. If I add mycorrhizae to a bucket with molasses or some other food source can I turn a few cc's into a few gallons?

amideutch June 2, 2012 09:37 AM

Never really looked into it. I can get MycoGrow soluble for $5.95 for an ounce which is enough for over 100 plants. Ami

[url]http://www.fungi.com/product-detail/product/mycogrow-soluble-1-oz.html[/url]

RayR June 2, 2012 09:50 AM

You can't grow mycorrhizae in compost tea. They are species of fungi and the spores need to be near the roots of a living host plant before they will hatch, attach to a root, grow and reproduce.
That is how Mycorrhizal innoculants are produced commercially, they are grown on plant roots, harvested and the propagules are separated. Propagules are viable spores and mycelium (fragments of mycorrhizal roots)

Randall June 2, 2012 11:17 AM

Here's a good reference for what RayR stated:

[URL]http://www.invam.caf.wvu.edu/methods/mycorrhizae/hyphae.htm[/URL]

RayR June 2, 2012 12:44 PM

That's an interesting page Randall, the way the hyphae aggregate in the water reminds me of another benefit that mycorrhizae give to improved soil structure. The glomalin protein that they excrete causes soil particles to aggregate into small clumps, improving drainage and aeration. A definite plus for heavy clay soils. There are other benefits of glomalin which you can [URL="http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/ad_hoc/54450000Glomalin/Glomalinbrochure.pdf"]read about here[/URL].

Randall June 2, 2012 01:32 PM

that's a great page. bookmarked!

amideutch June 2, 2012 01:41 PM

Both are excellent references. Ami

eltex June 2, 2012 08:46 PM

Like Ami said, the idea is that once a plant is given that bath of Myco at transplant time, they will never need it again, as it should live and grow as long as your plant does. While it is easy to say that, it is impossible to say if you soil might already have them, as many native soils already do. I know that I am currently running a trial of 16 bush bean plants, 8 with and 8 without Myco, though the brand I am using is Garden-ville. We made our first harvest today, and there is NO difference between them. Maybe my soil already had some that were dormant, maybe the Garden-ville brand is junk, or maybe they don't make a big difference for bush beans grown in healthy soil. There are a lot of questions there and it could take a few years to figure it all out.

RayR June 2, 2012 10:40 PM

I remember reading somewhere that Glomus mosseae was the most effective species of mycorrhizae at colonizing bean plants, other species didn't colonize as well or at all and didn't make much difference in growth or yield. It's a common workhorse species in most myco inocculants, but it might already be native to your soil for all we know. I don't know what variety of species are in Garden-ville's innoculant.
Other than mycorrhizae, Trichoderma fungi and the Nitrogen fixing Rhizobium bacteria species that colonize legume roots are highly beneficial to bean plants.

Atomic Garden June 5, 2012 06:26 PM

Thank you for all the info. Guess it is back to just plain old compost tea, which isn't a bad thing. That stuff WORKS!!!

Randall June 24, 2012 10:16 AM

Ran across this link this morning and this thread came to mind...This looks to be the easiest and most economical way to grow your own Mycorrhizae:

[URL]http://www.extension.org/pages/18627/on-farm-production-and-utilization-of-am-fungus-inoculum[/URL]

I hope this can help you out, Atomic Grow!

Randall

RayR June 25, 2012 01:07 AM

Randall, I was thinking about all the products that I used this season that already have Mycorrhizae innoculants in it.

Espoma Tomato-Tone
Espoma Bio-Tone
MycoGrow
Dr. Earth Organic Compost
Dr. Earth Organic 5
Some potting soils that I have used to amend my containers also have Mycorrhizae

Errr...why would I want to think about spending any more time or money to grow my own?:lol:

Randall June 25, 2012 09:28 AM

[QUOTE=RayR;286157]Errr...why would I want to think about spending any more time or money to grow my own?:lol:[/QUOTE]

I agree, Ray. With innoculation being a one time thing, in most cases you really only need a small amount. I think pumpkin growers use mycos multiple times because the vining plants are always setting new roots from nodes along the vine. I can see tomato growers who sprawl their plants finding benefits from multiple applications also.

For large scale production, I can see how growing your own mycos could save money. Any method that can clean up agriculture a bit and give it a nudge toward more sustainable methods is probably a good thing. As far as the home gardener goes, a little goes a long way.

Wi-sunflower June 26, 2012 07:50 AM

This thread is interesting and I wanted to be able to find it again. I always forget what forum threads are in since I usually view from the "new" posts link. So I had to post so I could find it in my "subscribed" list.

Carol

PA_Julia June 26, 2012 08:01 AM

Randall,

You are absolutely correct concerning using mycos on pumpkin plants.

I'm growing giant pumpkins this year and use a mixture of mycos, worm castings and other things to assist in rooting when I bury pumpkin vines at each leaf node.

I've also added some as a side dressing to my sweet pepper plants to see it it would promote a more rapid and thicker growth.

We shall see!!


Julia

[QUOTE=Randall;286200]I agree, Ray. With innoculation being a one time thing, in most cases you really only need a small amount. I think pumpkin growers use mycos multiple times because the vining plants are always setting new roots from nodes along the vine. I can see tomato growers who sprawl their plants finding benefits from multiple applications also.

For large scale production, I can see how growing your own mycos could save money. Any method that can clean up agriculture a bit and give it a nudge toward more sustainable methods is probably a good thing. As far as the home gardener goes, a little goes a long way.[/QUOTE]


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