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-   -   Are You Growing Any for the 1st Time Ever? (http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=8059)

grovespirit March 28, 2008 05:36 AM

New to me this year:
Swiss chard "bright lights" 6 weeks old, Looking pretty in a windowbox!
Purple choy sum- Waiting to germ.
Cress, Fine curled- Not yet planted
pepper, "Thai dragon" X "medusa" (personal cross, it is doing GREAT! Big clusters of medium heat Thai peppers.)
Rainbow Perilla "Magilla"
Mizuna- germinated 5 days ago
Anuenue Hawaiian lettuce (did not germ. for me in my MiracleGro potting soil, waaah. Will try again with remaining seeds in a soilless mix.)
Tokyo turnip (grown for greens), 2" tall
Okinawan spinach (purple on one side of leaves) from rooted cutting, 2' tall now.
Local dwarf tomato, "Kewalo" :Uniform ripening determinate bred at University of Hawaii to be resistant to bacterial wilt, mosaic virus and nematodes. 6-8 oz., red, round fruit with excellent sweet flavor. My 2 plants were STOLEN!! Next time these go in my back yard not the front.

Native hawaiian red currant tomato, volunteers that appeared in a rosebush pot. Hubby is fascinated with em, so I'm growing them out for now. But if I join the dual hemisphere dwarf tomato breeding project these will have to go... they x-pollinate everything too easily!

Chinese water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica)- doesn't need to be grown in water, just kept moist!

Hopefully... purple tomatillo and Fairy tale eggplant, if a trade for the seeds goes thru!

Maybe also (if I can find someone to trade for these):

#Chervena chujski miniature sweet pepper
#Mexican Sour Gherkin (dwarf teensy cuke from landreth seeds)
#Sweet Quartz VFNT: dwarf cherry tomato, reputed to resist my local pests and diseases.
#Udmalbet egg shaped, or Lao white egg-shaped eggplant

If you have even as few as 3 fresh seeds of the above to trade, please let me know. I don't have all my veggie and flower seeds on my trade list at this time, so I might have something you'd like... Please give me a chance to see what your wants are, if you have any of the above.

Or, if you're planning on buying the above, perhaps we can make arrangements to split the seed packs. For instance I could buy Chervena chujski, and you could buy the Mex Sour gherkin, and we could each send half the contents to the other person! :)


Thanks. :)

Ruth_10 March 29, 2008 11:37 PM

[quote=Tormato;94407]Ruth,

What are your thoughts on Guatemalan Blue?

Mine have been killed by vine borers, the past two years. This year it goes under a floating row cover.

Gary[/quote]

Gary,
My plants lived just long enough to produce a few squash and then went down to vine borers. I have to say I found them rather bland compared to a butternut or buttercup squash. They kept well, though. Two lasted until the end of February out in the garage.

I hope your floating row cover works for you (keep us posted). Vine borers are a real problem in my garden and produce one heartbreak after another.:(

OmahaJB March 30, 2008 10:56 AM

Are you growing any for the 1st time ever?
 
2008 will be my first outdoor garden since my family had a garden when I was a kid. I have grown tomatoes & peppers indoors these past couple of years with a 'little' success. But I know growing outdoors will be a whole different ballgame. Greater risks with weather, diseases, and animals, but also a much greater potential for reward in terms of what may be produced.

Besides tomatoes, sweet & hot peppers, I'll be giving the following a try:

Beans - Boston Favorite, Charlevoix Red Kidney, and Tiger's Eye are the ones I have seeds for. Will try at least one of those.

Corn - If the packet of seeds that I bought 3 years ago are still good, I'll grow a few of those.

Garlic - Planted last fall. Will check on them soon. They're planted at my mother's house and I haven't been over there to check on them recently. Am curious to see if anything popped through the soil. I've had them covered with a few inches of leaves all winter.

Melons - Will probably try both Ali Baba & Orangeglo. I also have seeds for Collective Farm Woman, Kansas & Thayer I may try if I can find room.

Potatoes - For some reason I have a real fascination with growing potatoes so will give it a go. Carola, German Butterball, and La Ratte are the varieties I put an order in for yesterday from Ronnigers. Now I'll have to wait and see if I actually receive them. I've had trouble with Milk Ranch two years in a row, and I believe Ronnigers owns them. Something like that. They are associated somehow. I plan on growing these in 10-gallon grow bags.

Rhubarb - We always had rhubarb when I was young. My mother asked that I grow some of that so will try to find a place that sells that this spring.

I've grown basil before but it will be my first year growing Cinnamon Basil. I'm looking forward to it.

May also try a couple of sunflowers, space permitting.

Lots of work, I mean fun, ahead these next few months!

Jeff

hmacdona February 5, 2012 02:55 PM

I'll be growing Perilla for the first time ever. Have never even tasted this before but am anxious to give it a try. If anyone has any great cooking ideas for this, would love to hear it. So far, all I know is it's packed full of nutrition and is often used in salads.

Riceloft February 5, 2012 03:11 PM

This year will mark a lot of firsts for me...

1st time growing lettuce and onions
1st time starting from seed
1st time growing non-hybrid tomatos
1st time growing each specific variety of tomato - Winsall, Cherokee Purple, Sungold, Wes, Brandywine from Croatia, Iditarod Red and Yukon Quest

nctomatoman February 5, 2012 03:17 PM

Aside from tomatoes, peppers and eggplant (which always include new things), here's what's new for me this year:

Carrots in large pots - Scarlet Nantes and Little Fingers
Many new lettuce varieties (to me, European heirlooms) courtesy of my friend Jeff
A white beet - Albino
Some new basil varieties - Mozzarella and Christmas
A few types of dried beans
Spaghetti Squash

RobinB February 5, 2012 03:43 PM

potatoes from seed (from Tom Wagner)
onions from seed instead of sets
Twenty-one out of thirty of my tomatoes are all new to me, including some for the Dwarf Tomato Project

I can't wait, it should be a fun, surprising season ahead with lots to learn!

FarmerShawn February 5, 2012 04:30 PM

Aside from scads of tomatoes (last year was a record for me at 26 varieties; this year I have 110!) I am looking forward to rat tail radishes, where you eat the seed pods, not the root. I also ordered a bunch of sweet potato trials from Sandhill Preservation.

Tom C zone 4/5 February 5, 2012 04:43 PM

Apios, ground nut, for the first time ever. Time will tell if this legume can adapt to amended clay soil.

kath February 5, 2012 06:55 PM

I can't help myself- aside from too many new tomatoes, I'm also growing lots of new kinds of garlic, pole beans, carrots, cabbage, sweet corn, lettuce, melons, red onions, shell peas, peppers, shallots, zucchini and potatoes- will be giving TPS a try this year, too. There are too many to list individually, but I love experimenting and finding what we like and what grows best, and I get almost as excited about many of them as I do about tomatoes.:D

tgplp February 5, 2012 06:58 PM

I'm pretty much growing new of everything this year... exciting, huh? But the most exciting thing for me is definitely the dwarf project tomatoes! I'll be working on two Blazing Beauty vials, Rosy F4, and Sweet Scarlet Dwarf. I sowed seeds for them yesterday- can't wait to see how they turn out!


Taryn :D

Jeannine Anne February 5, 2012 08:01 PM

Babington leeks, Ramsons, Rampions,Alexanders, Chou Daubenton perennial cabbage edible carrot leaf,variagated collards and two new runner beans supposed to be a cross between a runner and a common bean. Skirret which I sowed last year I am hoping will be OK for this year..all the above are new to me..mostly perennial for my new perennial patch, and have my fingersc crossed for some tree collards.

XX Jeannine

livinonfaith February 5, 2012 11:15 PM

[QUOTE=FarmerShawn;253093]Aside from scads of tomatoes (last year was a record for me at 26 varieties; this year I have 110!) I am looking forward to rat tail radishes, where you eat the seed pods, not the root. I also ordered a bunch of sweet potato trials from Sandhill Preservation.[/QUOTE]

I grew out the rat tail radishes for the first time this year and really enjoyed them. They varied in intensity from plant to plant, but that just added to their charm for me. I even added some of the very young leaves to some dishes, kind of like mustard greens.

You may be surprised at the size of the plants. They really sprawled all over the place for me. I guess when I was expecting them to stay small like regular radishes.:roll:

This year a lot of the garden is new. Growing in bales should be interesting.
Some of the new plants include lettuces, Tatsoi, kales, some of my peppers, and many of my tomatoes, including the dwarves.

One of the ones I'm really excited about is the Zuchetta Rampicante Tromboncino squash. (Heck, just the name is enough to get you excited) It's a member of the same squash family as the butternut, but can be eaten either as a summer squah or as a winter squash. It can get over four feet long.

I'm most excited, though, because it is more resistant to the nasty things that normally destroy my squash, usually before I get more than one or two.

Jeannine Anne February 6, 2012 01:48 AM

Trellis it if you want long staright ones , growm them on the ground if uou want some interesting snake like twisted ones.

XX Jeannine

FarmerShawn February 6, 2012 04:00 AM

[QUOTE=Jeannine Anne;253139]Trellis it if you want long staright ones , growm them on the ground if uou want some interesting snake like twisted ones.

XX Jeannine[/QUOTE]
Thanks for the suggestion, Jeannine. I'm thinking I might use some of those cone-shaped wire tomato cages. Would that work? Or what trellis alternative do you suggest? Just how tall will they get, anyway? I have two sizes of cages.

(I've got several of the tomato cages, but will likely do a Florida Weave for the tomatoes.)
Shawn

kath February 6, 2012 08:54 AM

[QUOTE=FarmerShawn;253143]Thanks for the suggestion, Jeannine. I'm thinking I might use some of those cone-shaped wire tomato cages. Would that work? Or what trellis alternative do you suggest? Just how tall will they get, anyway? I have two sizes of cages.

(I've got several of the tomato cages, but will likely do a Florida Weave for the tomatoes.)
Shawn[/QUOTE]


If we're talking about the Zucchetta Rampicante Tromboncino squash, I grew it for 2 years because of its resistance to the squash vine borer. The vines were the most rampant sprawling uncontrollable things ever! I tried to trellis them with a 15' long setup that was 5' high and they completely engulfed it and got away, despite my pruning- the vines easily reached 12-15'. The fruits were curvy even when trellised- got no straight ones. They were very good all the way up to 18" which was the limit I gave them, but I didn't try using them as winter squash because I read that they weren't so good that way. So just be ready- they need a LOT of room!:shock:

Kath

stormymater February 6, 2012 11:08 AM

Orach. Orach Purple Passion. It & some crazy amaranth. I want tasty greens in the summer when the sun beats most of the greens I like to death. We'll see.

FarmerShawn February 6, 2012 11:40 AM

[QUOTE=kath;253149]If we're talking about the Zucchetta Rampicante Tromboncino squash. . .

Kath[/QUOTE]
Well, that'll teach me to try to respond in the middle of the night when I should be abed. Because rat tail radishes were on my mind, I mistakenly assumed that's what Jeannine was talking about in her post. It sure makes a lot more sense to trellis long squash than radishes!:twisted:
Sigh.
Shawn

Jeannine Anne February 6, 2012 12:32 PM

Funny, sorry to confuse you. I grew rats tail about 4 years ago they grew about 30 inches high if I remember right..Prince Charles in the UK adopted this species from HSL so a few of us grew it to promote it.

Kath is quite right about how the squash grows. I grew it on a trellis arbour and the squash hung down from the roof part. They will make winter squash if fully mature but they sure do like to go!!

XX Jeannine

Tormato February 6, 2012 02:36 PM

New for me will be potatoes from seed, and artichokes. The artichokes may be a humbling experience.

Gary

nicky February 6, 2012 04:04 PM

I'm the same - TPS & artichoke, also Eggplant!

ScottinAtlanta February 6, 2012 04:19 PM

[QUOTE=Tormato;253207]New for me will be potatoes from seed, and artichokes. The artichokes may be a humbling experience.

Gary[/QUOTE]

Artichokes for me, too. I have no idea what they look like when they fruit. Is it one stalk or several?

Father'sDaughter February 6, 2012 06:01 PM

This year, of the 14 tomato varieties I'll be growing, all are new to me except for two. Oh, and that's not counting the dwarfs.

I'm also giving chard and Kale a try for the first time.

I'm sticking with the same varieties of most other vegetables, but I am trying different sweet Italian red peppers--Russo da Appendere, and for carrots, I just had to buy a pack of Paris Market--they look so cute!

And, I have two new garlic varieties over-wintering: German Red and Spanish Roja.

I still can't believe I'm growing that many tomato varieties. When I first joined here, I only had five on my list...

marc_groleau February 6, 2012 07:20 PM

This year I'll be trying heirloom tomatos for the first time
Moskovich
black Cherry
Sweet Orange Cherry
Cherokee Purple
Mr. Hawkins
Russian Big Roma

Last year I planted my first asaparagus bed. The results have yet to be seen.

Tormato February 7, 2012 03:02 PM

[QUOTE=ScottinAtlanta;253227]Artichokes for me, too. I have no idea what they look like when they fruit. Is it one stalk or several?[/QUOTE]

One stalk or several? :?!?: I have no idea.
Thanks for verifying that I'm in over my head.;)

Nicky,

I forgot, eggplant here also. And, spelt (if I spelt it right).:roll:

Gary

nicky February 7, 2012 03:17 PM

No Spelt for me. That looks very odd doesn't it 'spelt!' Hmm...

Yes, I have absolutely NO idea what an artichoke plant looks like. I have seen them pickled & in the produce section of the market. But I know nothing at all about them! I also have no idea what I will do with the harvest (if I get one). Artichoke & Asiago dip I guess!:D

I'm off to read up on Artichoke plants/planting!

kath February 7, 2012 04:09 PM

1 Attachment(s)
[QUOTE=ScottinAtlanta;253227]Artichokes for me, too. I have no idea what they look like when they fruit. Is it one stalk or several?[/QUOTE]

I grew a few plants in the 1980's and as far as I remember they looked like this picture:

nicky February 7, 2012 04:13 PM

Wow Kath - what a gorgeous plant! I may be growing more Artichokes :D

Thanks for the picture - that wasn't what I expected at all. I think I had them slotted in somewhere near my radish & beetroots. They are going to need more room - and a bit of research!

kath February 7, 2012 04:17 PM

The picture is from Google Images, not my garden, but the plants are quite big- as I recall they were at least 3' tall. Fun to grow but not very productive for the amount of food they produce compared to the space they need.

nicky February 7, 2012 04:20 PM

That Asiago & Artichoke dip & the fun of growing something odd may be worth the space! Maybe I should find a spot for them in the flower beds. I have a feeling that they would be a conversation piece amongst the flowers!


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