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Old November 20, 2020   #38
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 2,477
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusion_power View Post
Heads up that Glenn was impacted by the derecho winds that hit Iowa a couple of months ago. He may be short on some tomatoes and peppers as a result. I have quite a bit of fresh seed that may fill a few gaps for him but it won't be everything.
That storm was weirdly terrifying just going on and on. I was snug in a suburban home protected by 6 foot privacy fences and the wind was crazy in the afternoon and howling all night. Out in my fields north of here, I had a few cages tumble over at the end of the row where it wasn't doubled. Sadly those were Karen O's projects that were entangled. I should call a roofer to have a look at the corners too. If it isn't hail its flooding or wind in these parts in the past 10 years!

Fusion for some reason I haven't experienced septoria on my cherries, but everything else is horrific. My main tomato garden is in year two of a much needed rotation which limits my available space. Every single tomato plant in the row falls victim one by one turning into palm trees , but I had decent yields except for some sunscald. I grow on dewitt pro5 try and sweep up mummies and crunched leaf debris at season end. Do you think three year rotations actually are the "cure" or is it not possible to overcome a genetic predisposition to leaf diseases with cultural practices? Does weed fabric perpetuate this ( save for squash bugs) In other words, will this garden area ever not be a spotted jungle?

- Lisa
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