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Old March 2, 2018   #1
Black Krim
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Default Fruit Trees

Figured all you tomato growers are likely to have a fruit tree or two also..

Does anyone know what Stark did with the stock frrom Millers? The stark online catalog does NOT have all the old apple varieties that Miller's was known for. Stark historically has focused on developing its own improved varieties. I had hoped when the Miller franchise was purchased Stark would also sell the old antique varieties too.

Any one know where to get good old varieties of apples?
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Old March 2, 2018   #2
clkeiper
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yes, use Adams Co. nursery in Pa? or NY? https://www.acnursery.com/ you can literally order anything from them with the root stock and scion you want. all you have to do is set up an account that you are a marketer... selling the fruit you are growing. we started using them after visiting with a friend who is a LARGE grower. he told us to try them... thats who they use. they order a year or two in advance as they grow thousands of fruit trees. We ordered ours (which took a year) so we could get the root stock and scion we wanted. they grafted specifically for us.
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Old March 2, 2018   #3
mensplace
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http://nafex.org/about.php
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Old March 2, 2018   #4
bower
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I have a book published by Kent Whealy, SSE in 1989 called "Fruit Berry and Nut Inventory" that describes every variety known at the time and available by mail order in the States LOL Can't tell you how many hours I spent reading about apples I'll never see..

Adams is the second nursery on the list. Nice to know some enterprises just keep on going.
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Old March 2, 2018   #5
mensplace
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The all time classic: Apples of New York
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Old March 2, 2018   #6
PaulF
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I have decided to plant more fruit trees this year and begin an orchard where I used to mow grass. I'll still have to mow around the trees but there will be fruit to pick...I hope. All the current fruit trees have come from Stark and so will the new batch.
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Old March 2, 2018   #7
Black Krim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensplace View Post

VERY INTERESTING !!!!! thank you. Still looking.....
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Old March 2, 2018   #8
Black Krim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
yes, use Adams Co. nursery in Pa? or NY? https://www.acnursery.com/ you can literally order anything from them with the root stock and scion you want. all you have to do is set up an account that you are a marketer... selling the fruit you are growing. we started using them after visiting with a friend who is a LARGE grower. he told us to try them... thats who they use. they order a year or two in advance as they grow thousands of fruit trees. We ordered ours (which took a year) so we could get the root stock and scion we wanted. they grafted specifically for us.

I am late for ordering this year-- everything out of stock. THat is ok. Next y ear rolls around fast,

Do you know if the royalty surcharge is included in the pricing?
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Old March 2, 2018   #9
Black Krim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulF View Post
I have decided to plant more fruit trees this year and begin an orchard where I used to mow grass. I'll still have to mow around the trees but there will be fruit to pick...I hope. All the current fruit trees have come from Stark and so will the new batch.
Have you considered using chickens or geese to do your mowing? lol

I will likely buy from Stark this year as they still have stock. They use only Malling stock as far as I know and perhaps Bud. 9, but not the Geneva stock.

BUt I am still open to other sellers. Northern ones seem to work best for me.
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Old March 2, 2018   #10
Black Krim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
I have a book published by Kent Whealy, SSE in 1989 called "Fruit Berry and Nut Inventory" that describes every variety known at the time and available by mail order in the States LOL Can't tell you how many hours I spent reading about apples I'll never see..

Adams is the second nursery on the list. Nice to know some enterprises just keep on going.

Care to list out 1-5 ?

The Cummings site has decreased its offerings significantly, or the site removes varieties with zero stock.
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Old March 2, 2018   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Krim View Post
Have you considered using chickens or geese to do your mowing? lol
Actually we did think of that but decided against it mostly because they would end up food for the coyotes, bobcats and the odd mountain lion roaming around.
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Old March 2, 2018   #12
clkeiper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Krim View Post
Have you considered using chickens or geese to do your mowing? lol

I will likely buy from Stark this year as they still have stock. They use only Malling stock as far as I know and perhaps Bud. 9, but not the Geneva stock.

BUt I am still open to other sellers. Northern ones seem to work best for me.
No idea if there are royalty surcharges. I never asked. I ordered and paid and then they shipped it to us. order now for next year. when we ordered we ordered dwarf stock with "spray-less" scion cultivars.. Williams pride, crimson crisp, goldrush... which is my favorite yellow apple but very late in the season to ripen, red free, pristine.... etc. You can order pretty much anything Starks sells... I think. liberty, freedom... my favorite red apple, gingergold... and MANY more are "spray-less" tree. they produce more/better quality if they are sprayed but still produce without spray.
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Old March 2, 2018   #13
mensplace
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There are many people who have smaller nurseries. It is good to get apples suited to your region. have you ever consider grafting some for later? It is simple...and fun. Too it really opens your choices with over 4000 varieties. Too, be sure to get at least one good pollinator such as golden delicious. Scion wood is readily available. If you have clay, do NOT get trees on dwarf rootstock. Match your rootstock to your type of soil. Too, do not get full sized tree unless you have a lot of space and many years to wait. That leaves those among the medium rootstocks as the best all around size. Consider your cold winters. You don't want blossoms when it is still freezing. Do not fertilize the first year or too much later. Too much fertilizer and you will not get fruit.
Too much too soon and you can burn the roots. Low nitrogen. Consider your anticipated use and harvest date. Some of the old varieties are no longer used for good reason, they were like biting into wood with no flavor. Others are wonderful. If you anticipate cider making, that opens up a whole new game. Do you want fresh eating, canning, cooking, drying, or cider? Space? Soil type? Drainage? Bees?
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Old March 2, 2018   #14
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Located in the N.C. Mountains Big Horse Creek Orchards has been an apple tree supplier for many years. I know the owner personally as he is a vendor at the Ashe County Farmers Market. His website listed below.

http://bighorsecreekfarm.com/
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Old March 2, 2018   #15
berryman
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Ive grafted all of my about 200 apple and pear trees. Super cheap, fun and pretty easy. You can make your own tree for less than six bucks vs twenty to thirty each if nursery bought.
Plus, if you end up with a variety you want to replace later, you will have the skills to change it over to a new one for a dollar or two.
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