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Information and discussion for successfully cultivating potatoes, the world's fourth largest crop.

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Old November 2, 2014   #16
Worth1
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Okay the potatoes are completely dried out and as hard as a rock.
They are snow white on the inside.

I am afraid to eat them.

Maybe I will try to do some of the white chuno the next time.

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Old April 18, 2015   #17
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I'm going to try this, that would solve the problem with small ones [ok, usually my chickens are solving this problem] I am freezing some right now, and wanted to ask : is it important what kind of potato we are freezing? I mean if its starchy or waxy .. I am freezing some leftovers from my potatoes grown from TPS, and I just boiled the rest of it for chickens and tried few, and they are starchy or incredibly starchy.. Like, big visible starch grains shining inside like a little diamonds..
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Old April 18, 2015   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loeb View Post
I'm going to try this, that would solve the problem with small ones [ok, usually my chickens are solving this problem] I am freezing some right now, and wanted to ask : is it important what kind of potato we are freezing? I mean if its starchy or waxy .. I am freezing some leftovers from my potatoes grown from TPS, and I just boiled the rest of it for chickens and tried few, and they are starchy or incredibly starchy.. Like, big visible starch grains shining inside like a little diamonds..
I think either would be fine.
It is a process that is in the making.

I have found that the soaking in water and rinsing keeps them from turning black.
I found this out by accident.


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Old April 18, 2015   #19
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Soaking when they are defrosted, between freezing? I was reading about how they make it in Peru and there was something in soaking them in rivers.. I will try it too

Last edited by loeb; April 18, 2015 at 12:29 PM.
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Old April 18, 2015   #20
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Soaking when they are defrosted, between freezing? I readed about how they make it in Peru and there was something in soaking them in rivers.. I will try it too
Don't make yourself sick.

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Old April 18, 2015   #21
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Haha I'm not going to soak it in the river.. just in plain fresh tap water I don't think that would hurt me
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Old April 18, 2015   #22
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I think what is going on is the running water is removing the starch from the outer surface of the potato.
When this happens as the potato dries it wont turn black.

One of the things I do when I cut up fresh potatoes is to put them in water and use what we call fruit fresh in it.
This is mostly ascorbic acid and citric acid.
The black ones I made I tried and then tossed.
They tasted good but was creeped out by the color and was afraid I would get sick.

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Old May 30, 2017   #23
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Saw a documentary on this....
They have a variety that is very reliable but poisonous, the freezing and squeezing and rubbing off the skin removes the poison. Drying makes them edible. Can be saved for 10 yrs.
Think about making it once in a while, but too lazy....
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Old June 5, 2017   #24
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Default Dehydrating Potatoes

Used to make soups or stew with other vegetables. They keep forever at room temperature.

http://durgan.org/2016/October%20201...Potatoes/HTML/ 23 October 2016 Dehydrating Potatoes
Some Red Pontiac potatoes were dehydrated into a powder for long term storage. The potatoes were blended into a slurry of water and nixtamalized corn (to inhibit the slurry from sticking to the pan when dehydrating). Dehydration was about ten hours set at 125F/52C. The dried product was blended into a powder and stored in 250 ml canning jars. The slurry\powdering aspect saves much labour as opposed to the typical process used to dehydrate. The process is applicable to almost any product.
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