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Historical background information for varieties handed down from bygone days.

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Old July 9, 2014   #16
Father'sDaughter
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Okay, I'll change it to pink on my list. But how should I classify it -- eating, canning or multi-purpose?
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Old July 9, 2014   #17
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I would call it a slicer. I guess that could be eating or multi purpose?

I will tell you that I was never overly impressed with the taste of it. To me, it's just okay. Others rave about it. It was always one of the earliest tomatoes to ripen in my patch and it pumped out tomatoes all summer. I hope you will give it a try next year and report back on your experience with it.
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Old July 12, 2014   #18
JerryL
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Carolyn

I looked at the references you sighted but still believe the correct name for this variety is “Winsall”. I can see what SESE and others have on their website/catalog but must disagree with their statement. Most of the statements seem to be ‘cut & pastes” of one another.

Below is a portion of the full text version of the 1925 Peterson catalog. It clearly states that the first year No. “400” was given a ‘real’ name it was “Winsall”.

Follow the first link below, and then do a ‘Find on this page’ search for ‘Winsall’. It will take you to the text I show below.

If you follow the second link below it will take you to the actual 1925 catalog. Move to pages 14 & 15 to see the actual catalog ad which clearly states the correct name in 1925, the first year it is named by the contest winner, was “Winsall”



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
THE

PRIZE



FOR A

NAME



FOR THIS WONDERFUL NEW TOMATO OFFERED LAST YEAR UNDER THE NUMBER "400
HAS NOW BEEN AWARDED. SEE FULL PARTICULARS ON OPPOSITE PAGE

PETER HENDERSON & CO., 35 and 37 Cortlandt St., NEW YORI



From PETER HENDERSON & CO., NEW YOR K

915 HENDERSON'S

Newly Developed Prize Tomato



15

Winsall



Shown in Colors
on opposite page



It Wins Approval from 40,000 People— It Wins Prizes Wherever Shown—It Wins by its Qualities of
Sweetness, Solidity and Seedlessness — It Wins because of its Wonderful Size and Gorgeous Color.



When we described Hendersoo's Winsall Tomato offered as No
"400" last year "as bigger and better than Ponderosa" we were aware
that many of our friends might be somewhat incredulous ; but we now
know that they must be convinced of the truth of that statement,
because of the thousands of letters of praise for Henderson's Winsall
received from them during and since the growing season of last year —
a few of which we publish on this page.

Some of the letters describe Henderson's Winsall so well as almost
to render further description by us superfluous. We will however add to
the encomiimis of our friends a few words telling of it according to oxu'
own experience in our soil and climate.

Henderson's Winsall is about five days later than Ponderosa In
maturing its first fruits, but its second fruits seem to ripen more rapidly
than do the fruits of Ponderosa. The coloring is indeed perfection; the
bright red extending close up to the stem end. Henderson's Winsall
is undoubtedly the most meaty tomato ever produced; the entire fruit
being edible, tender, and delicious, and remarkable for an almost entire
absence of seeds. This latter characteristic is so pronounced that many
of our friends proposed to call it "Giant Seedless."

As for smoothness and formation Henderson's Winsall is a great
Improvement upon Ponderosa, and as time goes on we propose to still
further improve it by careful supervision.

Price— 25c. pkt

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://archive.org/stream/EverythingForTheGarden1925/PeterHendersonCo.0002_djvu.txt

https://archive.org/details/EverythingForTheGarden1925
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Old July 12, 2014   #19
carolyn137
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Thanks so much Jerry for what you posted above.

And now someone has to find out when and how it got changed to Wins All for so many folks to use that form. Probably a website somewhere that changed it.

In a way it reminds me of the situation with the blueberry cultivar that was listed as Tophat for so many years and then several places started calling it Top Hat.

I have no idea what the original name was.

Carolyn
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Old July 12, 2014   #20
boats1947
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This novice Kentucky guy thinks that the name was meant to signify "Wins All" meaning that the tomato variety won everything concerning tomatoes that year! The word evolved into "Winsall" due to normal slang/shortcuts, and poor grammatical practices, etc!
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Old July 12, 2014   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boats1947 View Post
This novice Kentucky guy thinks that the name was meant to signify "Wins All" meaning that the tomato variety won everything concerning tomatoes that year! The word evolved into "Winsall" due to normal slang/shortcuts, and poor grammatical practices, etc!
but Jerry posted above from the Henderson catalog and it was called Winsall.

I'm going to e-mail someone I know to see if that person knows when and where the name was changed by so many to Wins All.

Carolyn
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Old July 12, 2014   #22
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Hey gang - and thanks Carolyn for removing me from transcribing days of audio recordings taken over the week into my Excel spreadsheet (gets tedious!)...

So - Henderson did call it Winsall - that is the "official" name.

Someone in NC, in 1994, sent me seeds for a tomato which he clearly spelled as "Wins All" in the letter and on the seed packet - to keep true to the source, I believe I may have listed it in the SSE as that (with the history) - and it may well be "Winsall" as released by Henderson.

I've grown them both (Winsall from Gary Staley sent to me in 1988 which he spelled as "Winsall" and "Wins All" as sent to me by the North Carolina fellow - and they were essentially both tasty regular leaf, large fruited pink beefsteak types - which is what one would expect, being essentially a selection of Henderson's original Ponderosa.

Isn't this fun!

Thanks again for pinging me, C!
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Old November 4, 2014   #23
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I am confused, did this thread turn into talking about 2 separate tomato's?
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Old November 4, 2014   #24
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Quote:
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I am confused, did this thread turn into talking about 2 separate tomato's?

Yes, it did.

Aunt Lou's is a contender for a spot next year, but I won't make a final decision for a few more months.
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Old February 24, 2015   #25
Direct Sunlight
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I find it interesting... were there many pink tomatoes around in the 1800s?
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Old February 25, 2015   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Direct Sunlight View Post
I find it interesting... were there many pink tomatoes around in the 1800s?
Absolutely!

But the word purple was used back then to indicate pink by most of the seed companies that were introducing new varieties.

If you google Victory Seeds you'll see Mike has a who section devoted to the varieties that the Livingston Seed C, to name one company, introduced in the late 18 hundreds.

Carolyn
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Old March 5, 2015   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
Absolutely!

But the word purple was used back then to indicate pink by most of the seed companies that were introducing new varieties.

If you google Victory Seeds you'll see Mike has a who section devoted to the varieties that the Livingston Seed C, to name one company, introduced in the late 18 hundreds.

Carolyn
Didn't see the part you spoke of but I did join their Facebook page. Looks like a great organization!
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Old March 5, 2015   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Direct Sunlight View Post
Didn't see the part you spoke of but I did join their Facebook page. Looks like a great organization!
Mike no longer lists all of the Livingston varieties, but here are some using the search feature.

http://www.victoryseeds.com/search.a....y=7&search=GO

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Old May 21, 2016   #29
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Uhoh. I picked up some Aunt Lou's Underground Railroad seeds from Mad River Seeds, and they're apparently striped, not pink? My plants haven't even started blooming yet, but this is the photo the seller provided. Do I not have the true thing, then?
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Old May 21, 2016   #30
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Never heard of it before but would love to have a few seeds of it as I'm straight across the river from Ripley Ohio.
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