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Historical background information for varieties handed down from bygone days.

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Old February 16, 2010   #31
cortona
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jhp: in my family is a sort of summer tradition to make salsa for winter use so i ever hunt for the best productive in my hot and dry summer, and at now i'm realy happy with this unnamed heirloom, it give me more tomato pulp tan roma(it means more salsa from the same tomatoes) good flawor and strong disease resistence!
i grown it totaly organic(no chemicals were i produce food for myself) i dont know if in different condition it can perform as wel, but if you are interested in some seeds just pm me and the seeds are your!
Emanuele
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Old February 16, 2010   #32
jhp
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jhp: in my family is a sort of summer tradition to make salsa for winter use so i ever hunt for the best productive in my hot and dry summer, and at now i'm realy happy with this unnamed heirloom, it give me more tomato pulp tan roma(it means more salsa from the same tomatoes) good flawor and strong disease resistence!
i grown it totaly organic(no chemicals were i produce food for myself) i dont know if in different condition it can perform as wel, but if you are interested in some seeds just pm me and the seeds are your!
Emanuele
Thank you Emanuele! That is very kind of you and worth a try!

Jen
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Old February 16, 2010   #33
brokenbar
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I agree with Dewayne about Old German..I have been growing it for a number of years now and it is always a fav.of mine..It is a big beautiful meaty bi-color..I think it has superb taste..
Agree...me too, and Old German looks so darn good sliced on a platter. My Husband grows this and he says it is a "no bother" tomato....just consistantly does it's thing year after year, no special anything. And I know they get pretty darn big, I try not to notice what my Husband grows because the way he does things DRIVES ME CRAZY but as he grows everything else and I only grow tomatoes for drying, I try to keep my mouth shut ...This is one of the largest that he grows and he says it sells well.
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Old February 16, 2010   #34
brokenbar
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Cortona- this sound like a great tomato to me. I make sauce every year. I am on a quest for my ultimate paste tomato.

Jen
For sauce, nothing beats Costoluto Genovese in my book. It comes through the processor practically finished sauce and it is a tomato that tastes entirely different cooked than raw. I have tried probably 30-50 varieties over the years for sauce and I have always come back to Costoluto Genovese. Costoluto Fiorentino is a close second but is smaller in my garden. I will be trying DiNofrio's German on a small batch of sauce this year. They are HUGE, nearly seedless, meaty and dry and were mid-season in my Wyoming garden. They taste GREAT dried but that may not translate over to sauce.
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Old February 16, 2010   #35
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Thanks brokenbar,thanks alot! LOL. I have costoluto Genovese seeds, but in trying to narrow down my list of 70 for this year, I took em off the list. Now you post this and here I am wondering where to grow one more.....
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Old February 16, 2010   #36
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Thanks brokenbar,thanks alot! LOL. I have costoluto Genovese seeds, but in trying to narrow down my list of 70 for this year, I took em off the list. Now you post this and here I am wondering where to grow one more.....
They really are that good...several others here have said the same as me...They are not all that hot however, eating out-of-hand. The cooking does something to them chemically (someone on here knew exactly what it did but I forget.) COmeon..always room for JUST ONE MORE!!!
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Old February 17, 2010   #37
barefootgardener
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brokenbar, I am trying Costoluto Genovese for the first time this year. I received 5 seeds in a trade..How is the productivity for this tom?..

I am also looking to make some sauce for fresh and to can...I will be growing other varieties as well, I Love Amish Paste..but I know I will eventually have to narrow everything down , finding one or two just for sauce..will save seeds for next year, so will have more to plant next year..
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Old February 17, 2010   #38
brokenbar
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brokenbar, I am trying Costoluto Genovese for the first time this year. I received 5 seeds in a trade..How is the productivity for this tom?..

I am also looking to make some sauce for fresh and to can...I will be growing other varieties as well, I Love Amish Paste..but I know I will eventually have to narrow everything down , finding one or two just for sauce..will save seeds for next year, so will have more to plant next year..
It (CG) has been very productive for me. The plants are Intermediate but only get about 5-6 foot tall and are easy to keep tied to the stake. Mine are always loaded top to bottom but I never actually counted how many I got off one plant (as anal as I am it is amazing I have not...) They come through the processer as a thick, cohesive sauce, barely any water and they cook down quickly. The taste is incredible but I am not kidding about eating -out-of-hand...they are just so-so fresh. 10 to 12 ounces and very fluted. They are also mid season for me here in Wyoming. I might add that when we get terrible wind, some of my plants can't hack it and will drop fruit...Costoluto Genovese never loses fruit, even kept them on during a hail storm we had. They also keep well if you have to pick and leave them setting on the counter for a few days. If I have one complaint, I wish they were three times the size!
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Old February 17, 2010   #39
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Thank's for the info brokenbar..Look forward to making sauce from CG..I can taste it now!! Mmmm...
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Old February 17, 2010   #40
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Thanks brokenbar. I think I'll have to add Costoluto Genovese to my list this year!

Jen
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Old February 20, 2010   #41
cortona
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yep, i agree with brokenbar and yes costoluto fiorentino i s a little smaller but is from my region and i grown it past years...wel...i have to sow this too, thanks to remember me to add this to the sow list!
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Old February 22, 2010   #42
b54red
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No, but I had a volunteer last year that out performed my Big Beefs and I saved seed from it to try it this year and see if it grows out true. It was similar to big beef but slightly smaller and made a few less fruit but was more disease tolerant and lasted the longest in a very wet and disease prone year. It may be a F2 of Big Beef.

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B54red and Travis
Have you ever grown the Big Beef OP version?

Dennis
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Old February 22, 2010   #43
travis
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I had a volunteer last year that out performed my Big Beefs.

It was similar to big beef but was more disease tolerant and lasted the longest in a very wet and disease prone year.

It may be a F2 of Big Beef.
Very interesting. Usually an F2 of a hybrid tomato variety with multiple disease resistances such as Big Beef will segregate and recombine without all of the disease resistances inherent in the F1.

Which of the disease resistances in Big Beef hybrid (VFFNTA) plagues your garden?

If your F3s and future generations continue to display superior tolerance to the diseases common in your locale, your selections may prove very valuable for you and your gardening neighbors.

Best of luck in 2010.
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Old February 22, 2010   #44
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b54
that's cool - maybe you will have one that works out - by the way I have only seen Big Beef OP at Tomatfest - just never tried or know anyone who has tried it
Dennis
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Old May 20, 2010   #45
tedln
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This is my first year to grow heirlooms from seed. For size, production, and taste; I'm growing Cuostralee, Mortgage Lifter, Kelloggs Breakfast, Prudens Purple and Brandywine Sudduth. I have high expectations for those. I have planted some Sweet Carneros Pink, Brown and Black Boar, and Berkley Tie Dye hopefully for taste and production. I will also be growing Black from Tula and JD's special C Tx for the same reason as well as Black Krim and Cherokee Purple. I selected all of these after a lot of research and hoped to not find any of those on this list of heirlooms not to grow. I think I am safe so far.

I did germinate, plant, and grow the following heirlooms which many people told me are a waste of time and space for various reasons. Roma (I've never intentionally grown a determinate tomato), Stupice (opinions varied from a total waste of time to one of their favorites), and Climbing Trip-L Crop (I just want to see what it will do and if it is as bad as people say)

Ted
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