Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Discussion forum for commercial seed, plant and garden supply sources.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old April 25, 2017   #31
NarnianGarden
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Finland, EU
Posts: 2,080
Default

That is so sad. A well-meaning law that was drafted to regulate sharing of natural resources is now being used precisely for the opposite purpose.. to make things difficult for those, who wish to protect the species.
It's surprising that the Peruvian government is not actively protecting or promoting these wild tomatoes. Perhaps they consider it a nuisance..

Last edited by NarnianGarden; April 25, 2017 at 12:27 PM.
NarnianGarden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 25, 2017   #32
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,084
Default

Marek, I have the same article in myfaves.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel...ant-180955911/

Dr.Chatelet was very helpful to me over the years and it started like this

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Sara%27s_Galapagos

First Amy did not take her daughter to the Galapagos Islands, she went by herself but ultimately named it after her daugter Sara.

I had asked Amy to bring me back seeds of cheesmanni if she could since there was a lot of interest in salt tolerant accessions back then

Cheesmanii, both major and minor are are yellow/gold.

When she came back, I don't know how she got past customs but she sent me actual fruits and they were Red, so I knew I didn't have what I had hoped for and as the tania link indicated I did call Dr.Chatelet and in that link you could see what he said.

Yes the red looked like and talked like a pimp,but wasn't a true one.

The TGRC is a remarkable place as you probably know already.They have lists of what has been found on each of the islands,the gene association list is remarkable.As well as all the species found in South America,I think it's up to 17 now. And they send out seeds to researchers and breeders all over the world, yes, they too have to fill out forms.

All to say that I saved seeds from the red, never proccessed them in any way,it was too late to do that,sowed seed,got close to 100% germination, too many seedlings so I set out just two,and I loved it.A huge chore to harvest those tiny fruits and even more so to get the seeds out of the fruits whichI'd just pop open and let the seeds fall out but the darn thing were also good at floating..

And yes,again, I know all about the application and verification process that one needs to go through, since it was Keith Mueller at his superb website,whom I knew, who did that for many of what he bred.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 25, 2017   #33
DanishGardener
Tomatovillian™
 
DanishGardener's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denmark
Posts: 234
Default

I have grown two strains from the Galapagos islands. One from Santa Cruz Island, and one from Isabela Island. The one from Santa Cruz had narrow leaves (heavily serrated) and orange jointless fruits. The one from Isabela Island had hairy/broad leaves, and had yellow fruits with joints. Both was from wild collected seeds from a European genebank. The taste was unremarkable, the growth was very remarkable though. Especially the one from Santa Cruz grew very fast into a huge, wide plant.

Last edited by DanishGardener; April 25, 2017 at 04:57 PM.
DanishGardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 25, 2017   #34
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,084
Default

And I just remembered about Botaniqe Originale, which I got from Nobert in France in that huge trade that 4 of us had with him back in 1992,so here's a couple of links that might interest someone here.

First,an old thread from Tomatoville about Botanique Originale

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=10164

I first grew it when I was doing a reproduction garden for varieties known to be around in 1840 and that for the Shaker place up near the Albany,NY airport, where Mother Ann Lee had her last residence and died there and yes, there is still a cemetery there where she was buried as well as an Ann Lee pond named for her.I set out two plants next to each other. Huge gorgeous plants with blossoms that were pale yellow and very fragile that fluttered like butterflies when the wind blew, but not ONE blossom ever set fruit. I think I asked someone about it and they it was self incompatible or something like that.

I know about incompatibility with tomatillos and that you have to put out at least two plants so they can cross pollinate, but I had two plants out and nada.

And now a more general link about tomato history which I think is pretty darn good and where it speaks to incompatibility it speaks to me of Botanique Originale.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato



Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2017   #35
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
Marek, I have the same article in myfaves.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel...ant-180955911/

Dr.Chatelet was very helpful to me over the years and it started like this

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Sara%27s_Galapagos

First Amy did not take her daughter to the Galapagos Islands, she went by herself but ultimately named it after her daugter Sara.

I had asked Amy to bring me back seeds of cheesmanni if she could since there was a lot of interest in salt tolerant accessions back then

Cheesmanii, both major and minor are are yellow/gold.

When she came back, I don't know how she got past customs but she sent me actual fruits and they were Red, so I knew I didn't have what I had hoped for and as the tania link indicated I did call Dr.Chatelet and in that link you could see what he said.

Yes the red looked like and talked like a pimp,but wasn't a true one.

The TGRC is a remarkable place as you probably know already.They have lists of what has been found on each of the islands,the gene association list is remarkable.As well as all the species found in South America,I think it's up to 17 now. And they send out seeds to researchers and breeders all over the world, yes, they too have to fill out forms.

All to say that I saved seeds from the red, never proccessed them in any way,it was too late to do that,sowed seed,got close to 100% germination, too many seedlings so I set out just two,and I loved it.A huge chore to harvest those tiny fruits and even more so to get the seeds out of the fruits whichI'd just pop open and let the seeds fall out but the darn thing were also good at floating..

And yes,again, I know all about the application and verification process that one needs to go through, since it was Keith Mueller at his superb website,whom I knew, who did that for many of what he bred.

Carolyn
Interesting story:-)

Yes, I know TGRC, they have amazing collection of wild tomatoes. But I never ordered seeds from them.

Are there really 17 discovered species of tomatoes? Searching through internet I can find this:

10 species - study from 2005.

13 species - study from 2005.

13 species - study from 2008.

Is there any updated study?
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2017   #36
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

By the way, do you know the Key for the Lycopersicon and related Solanum species?
Useful, although rough tool:-)
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27, 2017   #37
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,084
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marek Kvapil View Post
Interesting story:-)

Yes, I know TGRC, they have amazing collection of wild tomatoes. But I never ordered seeds from them.

Are there really 17 discovered species of tomatoes? Searching through internet I can find this:

10 species - study from 2005.

13 species - study from 2005.

13 species - study from 2008.

Is there any updated study?
You've changed the above from when I last saw it where you were citing info from 2008, etc. and asking if anyone had any updates.so I'm going to link to some stuff I had already saved to my faves before you changed it

http://tgrc.ucdavis.edu/key.aspx

The above is current, to 2017

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato

the one above goes through the key for Solanum and Lycopersicon as did the first link

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...o+wild+species

The one above repeats some info but there is some new as well.

A laboratory in England requested many pimps from the TGRC and did QTL DNA snips to see if they were true pimps or not. I once had it in my faves but I think I tried to access it and it was a dead link.

How would you order seeds from TGRC, as you said above,when you now know from what I posted earlier that you have to fill out an application first, and then verify what you have bred,etc.


Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27, 2017   #38
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
You've changed the above from when I last saw it where you were citing info from 2008, etc. and asking if anyone had any updates.so I'm going to link to some stuff I had already saved to my faves before you changed it

http://tgrc.ucdavis.edu/key.aspx

The above is current, to 2017

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato

the one above goes through the key for Solanum and Lycopersicon as did the first link

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...o+wild+species

The one above repeats some info but there is some new as well.

A laboratory in England requested many pimps from the TGRC and did QTL DNA snips to see if they were true pimps or not. I once had it in my faves but I think I tried to access it and it was a dead link.

How would you order seeds from TGRC, as you said above,when you now know from what I posted earlier that you have to fill out an application first, and then verify what you have bred,etc.


Carolyn
Carolyn, thanks for reply. I think I had done no editation of my two last comments, but it is not important...

Back to my question: So are there 17 proven species of tomatoes, or 13 or how many? According to the latest research. I am just curious:-)

Carolyn, I do not understand your last sentence in your last comment. Is it a question or advise or just a claim or what do you mean? Please, could you clarify it to me? Thanks, marek
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27, 2017   #39
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,084
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marek Kvapil View Post
Carolyn, thanks for reply. I think I had done no editation of my two last comments, but it is not important...

Back to my question: So are there 17 proven species of tomatoes, or 13 or how many? According to the latest research. I am just curious:-)

Carolyn, I do not understand your last sentence in your last comment. Is it a question or advise or just a claim or what do you mean? Please, could you clarify it to me? Thanks, marek
Last I knew there were 17, but I could only ID 14. There were pictures of all 17 somewhere, but I don't know where and no time to Google either.

(How would you order seeds from TGRC, as you said above,when you now know from what I posted earlier that you have to fill out an application first, and then verify what you have bred,etc.)

Nothing I haven't said before since you don't ORDER seeds,you fill out all those papers and let them decide if your background in breeding tomatoes is consistent with their guidelines in which case they will approve your application and request.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28, 2017   #40
Marek Kvapil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Czech Republic
Posts: 20
Default

17 tomato species: https://solgenomics.net/about/solanum_nomenclature.pl
Marek Kvapil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28, 2017   #41
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,084
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marek Kvapil View Post
I should have remembered to go there since it was based in Geneva NY,and I know two ladies who did research there, met both of them in person since one had relatives in my area and they both stopped here to show me some of their results.Joanne Labate was doing SNIP DNA analysis on pimps as part of a project on the development of the tomato, that I remember.

I have several links I was going to give here, and one of them said that the # of known species is going to go even high.

This one is different and is for you when you said you wanted to order some accessions from the TGRC.

http://tgrc.ucdavis.edu/policy.aspx

As for Cornell starting the solgene project and then went internationally, which was a great move, I'm proud of them since Cornell was my alma mater.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 29, 2017   #42
robertamell
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: italy
Posts: 12
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marek Kvapil View Post
As most of the tomato genetic diversity still lies in so called "wild tomato" species, I would like to extend my collection to all 13 existing tomato species. The species Solanum Lycopersicum and Solanum Pimpinellifolium are relatively easily available but it seems much more challengening to gain seeds of another tomato species from other sources than national genebanks which I would like to avoid because receiving seeds from them is conditioned by signing an agreement which restricts the future use of the genetic material.

If you know of any non-genebank source of the wild tomato seeds, please put the link into the comments. As I live and garden in the Czech Republic I prefer the seed sources inside the European Union.

Thanks for your tips:-)


marek
sorry i am late to this but i am in italy and you can visit my site
www.antichevarieta.it
robertamell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 29, 2017   #43
carolyn137
Tomatoville® Moderator
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 20,084
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by robertamell View Post
sorry i am late to this but i am in italy and you can visit my site
www.antichevarieta.it
And just where have you been young lady? I tried to get back in touch with you but your computer broke down and then your laptop, etc. Remember that?

I still have that list in my databook of the authentic Italian ones you sent me that you were growing at that farm,or had access to them.

So good to see you here, you should stop by more often,IMO.

Carolyn
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:46 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★