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Old May 23, 2012   #1
Doug9345
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Default Murphy's Law on seeds

I plant 10 Purple De Milpa tomatillo seeds in a cup on April 15. By May 15 none of them have come up so I decide to plant the rest of the 28 seeds in the packet with the hope that I can get two to come up. Yep you got it. Three days after I plant the 28 seeds the original seeds start to germinate and three more days later so do the later seeds. I now have 4 seedlings from the first batch and 5 more from the second batch. I'll bet even more come up as time goes along. I just hope I have enough time left to get a few ripe.
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Old May 23, 2012   #2
Worth1
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The same thing happened to me.
I think the temps were too low in the garage.

I just noticed you were talking about tomatillos NOT tomatoes.

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Old May 23, 2012   #3
Doug9345
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I suspect that was the problem also, although I did give them some heat.
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Old May 23, 2012   #4
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I edited it above but I just noticed you were talking about tomatillos not tomatoes.
Never planted a tomatillo seed before.

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Old May 23, 2012   #5
Doug9345
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This is the first year for me. I think they need warmer temperatures. The tomato seed that took a month to come up was ols and I didn't have any more to plant so I didn't get the new and old plantings coming up together.
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Old May 23, 2012   #6
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Tomatillos do need pretty warm temps to take off. They tend to grow like weeds, too much nutrients or water and you'll get a big beautiful, but fruitless, plant. Ahhh fresh salsa verde, I'm getting hungry!
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Old May 23, 2012   #7
Doug9345
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojave View Post
Tomatillos do need pretty warm temps to take off. They tend to grow like weeds, too much nutrients or water and you'll get a big beautiful, but fruitless, plant. Ahhh fresh salsa verde, I'm getting hungry!
Should I try growing a couple in pots so that I can keep them drier than they may be in the garden and do you have a good salsa verde recipe?
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Old May 23, 2012   #8
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I've never tried growing them in pots, I'd try a couple in the ground and a couple in pots.

Here's the basics for my salsa verde:

6 or 7 medium tomatillos

3 or 4 (more or less depending on your taste) Jalapenos or Serranos (I like to throw in a Habanero or Scotch Bonnet pepper too)

Juice of 1/2 large lime, or 2 of the small key limes if you can find them

1/2 white onion, chopped

3 or 4 cloves garlic, unpeeled

About a tablespoon chopped or shredded cilantro

Salt to taste.

Peel the tomatillo husks off and wash the tomatillos (they'll be sticky). Put a piece of foil with the edges turned up (so you don't lose any juice) on a cookie sheet directly under the broiler. Put the tomatillos, garlic and chili peppers on the foil and let them slightly char under the broiler. Flip them over and char the other side. Remove most of the charred tomatillo skin and the charred garlic skin. Chop tomatillos, garlic and peppers and put in a bowl. Add the juice from the foil, the lime juice, onions, cilantro and salt. Mix and serve!

Don't worry about the charred bits in the salsa, it adds an earthy flavor. As an alternative you could boil the peppers and tomatillos, but it isn't the same.
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Old May 23, 2012   #9
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Sounds a lot like what I did last year except mine was quite a bit milder and I didn't broil anything.

That sounds like a grand improvement!

Come on little tomatillos! Grow!
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Old May 23, 2012   #10
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I don't know if you've ever tried nopales (prickly pear cactus pads). They're usually boiled and are OK that way, but broiling them takes them to a whole new level of awesomeness!
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Old May 24, 2012   #11
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I have four purple tomatillo plants growing in a group together. Huge plants with lots of flowers. The bees are working hard but I'm not seeing any fruits yet.
Any advice?
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Old May 24, 2012   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracydr View Post
I have four purple tomatillo plants growing in a group together. Huge plants with lots of flowers. The bees are working hard but I'm not seeing any fruits yet.
Any advice?
I have tons of flowers no bees and one fruit.
Reall disappointed this year with no bees.
It might be aftermath from last years big fire.

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Old May 24, 2012   #13
Lcottomsvcs
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My tomatillos are flowering like crazy, but no fruit yet. Thanks to another thread on TV, I knew to buy at least 2 plants. Does anybody have an idea when these things will fruit? This is my first time for tomatillos.....It has been in the 80-90's here every day with low nights in the 50's. Maybe its still too cool for fruit?
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Old May 24, 2012   #14
stonysoilseeds
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of course there much much later here in upstate new york i havent even set mine out yet but after the flowers drop they get a papery husk that enclloses the fruit and takes a few weeks from then for harvest we have very cool nights so u dont think temps in the 50s would inhibit fruiting
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Old June 22, 2012   #15
docgipe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
I have tons of flowers no bees and one fruit.
Reall disappointed this year with no bees.
It might be aftermath from last years big fire.

Worth
One can play bee with a soft artists brush. Pick up the pollen and move it to any other female you wish. Q-Tips work as well but require a very gentle touch. It only takes one grain of pollen on the female part to satisfy the pollination.
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