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Old July 25, 2015   #1
barefootgardener
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Default Insuk's Wang Kong

Here are a few pictures of Insuk's Wang Kong runner beans that I started from seed this spring. I started 12 seeds in cups and all germinated. I planted some in my GH to grow up a trellis. And the rest I planted out in the garden to climb up a pole. (unfortunately something ate a couple down to the nub!) The flowers/blossoms and seeds are beautiful! The flowers are more of a fluorescent red/orange color when in bloom. I did have one white flower bloom on one plant. I am getting some little beans now on the plants! This is my first time growing them. I have not seen any hummers on them yet! (Fortex pole bean in foreground)

Ginny


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Old July 25, 2015   #2
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Old July 25, 2015   #3
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Old July 25, 2015   #4
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They are beautiful! Sorry that the hummers haven't discovered them - yet. Hopefully, they will.

Linda
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Old July 26, 2015   #5
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So would you be eating these strictly as dry beans, or can you eat while they are still string beans? Thank you for posting the pics, I have never seen or grown these before but I am familiar with the name. If I am not mistaken, I was going to order them once a couple of years ago but the site was sold out and I didn't bother looking around. They are so pretty, I would use them in my front yard.
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Old July 26, 2015   #6
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IWK can be eaten as snaps when young, before the pods show bulges. I even snack on them raw, they are sweeter raw than many common snap beans. The beans are fairly good eaten as shellies, when the seeds are fully grown in the pods but not yet dry. The original source said he used the mature seed as dry beans, but I've never tried that.
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Old July 26, 2015   #7
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Here are a few pics I just took with my camera.


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Old July 26, 2015   #8
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Old July 26, 2015   #9
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Here is a shot where the beans are more mature. Zeedman, the pods are flat and about four inches long. Ready to eat at this stage? I should go back out and pick one and eat it. How do you cook the pods as snaps, at this stage? Stir fry?? Saute in olive oil and bacon??



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Old July 26, 2015   #10
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Originally Posted by Labradors2 View Post
They are beautiful! Sorry that the hummers haven't discovered them - yet. Hopefully, they will.

Linda
Linda, I just discovered a few hummers on the beans early this morning. Out in the garden and one in my GH. I took a picture of the hummingbird inside my GH with my phone. but, unfortunately I am having problems uploading them from computer. I will try later. Thank you!
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Old July 26, 2015   #11
barefootgardener
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Originally Posted by peebee View Post
So would you be eating these strictly as dry beans, or can you eat while they are still string beans? Thank you for posting the pics, I have never seen or grown these before but I am familiar with the name. If I am not mistaken, I was going to order them once a couple of years ago but the site was sold out and I didn't bother looking around. They are so pretty, I would use them in my front yard.
peebee, I hope to let a few mature in the pods and let dry so I can save some seeds to plant next season, and to share!
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Old July 26, 2015   #12
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The flowers are so pretty on those beans. I wonder if they would grow well here.
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Old July 26, 2015   #13
barefootgardener
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The flowers are so pretty on those beans. I wonder if they would grow well here.
I do know in the south you would need to plant the seeds as early in the spring as possible. I would start the seeds indoors a few weeks or so before planting. If the temps get too hot, you should still at least get the flowers. Not sure about the beans. Maybe someone from your area will chime in..

Ginny
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Old July 27, 2015   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barefootgardener View Post
Here is a shot where the beans are more mature. Zeedman, the pods are flat and about four inches long. Ready to eat at this stage? I should go back out and pick one and eat it. How do you cook the pods as snaps, at this stage? Stir fry?? Saute in olive oil and bacon??



The smaller pod in the foreground appears to be at the best stage for eating as a snap, the ones behind it are a little too old. The pods do develop fiber as they enlarge, so they are best picked small. "Small" is relative, depending upon the weather where they are grown... in my quick-to-warm summers, the pods are shorter, and I harvest at about 3-4"; but in a cool Maritime climate, they could be longer in snap stage. The young pods eaten raw had no trace of strings for me, and were quite pleasant.

IWK had a bumper crop for me last year, but I'm growing Gigandes and Tucomares Chocolate runner beans this year. TC has really beautiful flowers, bi-colored pink & red... the hummers have been all over them.
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Old July 27, 2015   #15
barefootgardener
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Thank you Zeedman. I will pick a few of the smaller ones in the morning and let the more mature ones keep growing for seed.

The Tucomares Chocolate sounds amazing. I will have to look it up. Do you mind if I ask where one might purchase seed?

Ginny
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