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Old January 23, 2016   #16
Worth1
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Well I went to HD to see what the had and they didnt have anything but the confounded yard long beans.
I didn't get any I have some time to decide
What I did get was 4 grape root stocks like I said I wanted.

Black monukka.
Mars.
Thomson seedless.
Red Flame.

One of these has got to work.

Worth
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Old January 23, 2016   #17
joseph
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I've been growing runner beans for 7 years. I've been able to get a crop from them the past 3 years. Last year the biggest crop ever. They don't set fruit well during hot weather. A bit at a time I'm selecting for a strain that can make seeds in hot weather. Mine grow to the top of 6 foot bean poles, and have plenty of vine left over.
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Old January 23, 2016   #18
JoParrott
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Well, Worth, it sounds like you have been given many varieties to choose from!
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Old January 23, 2016   #19
Redbaron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Well I went to HD to see what the had and they didnt have anything but the confounded yard long beans.
I didn't get any I have some time to decide
What I did get was 4 grape root stocks like I said I wanted.

Black monukka.
Mars.
Thomson seedless.
Red Flame.

One of these has got to work.

Worth
Not necessarily. I did that two years running and nothing survived. Next time I am trying a scuppernog / muscadine
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Old January 23, 2016   #20
Worth1
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I'm getting started on my front yard Teepee tomorrow.
I am going to take a chunk of wood and drill 4 compound angle holes at 30° and insert 10" joints of 3/4 rigid conduit.

Worth
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Old January 23, 2016   #21
Worth1
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I can't sit still for a minute I get an idea and I have to act on it.
Here is the test pyramid and how I did it.
I set my drill press table up on two 30 degree angles at the same time and made a miniature.
Worth
IMG_20160123_48250.jpg

IMG_20160123_37420.jpg
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Old January 24, 2016   #22
4season
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Just be cautious about eating uncooked scarlet runners or hyacinth beans. Raw they may contain somewhat toxic glucosides.
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Old January 24, 2016   #23
Worth1
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Just be cautious about eating uncooked scarlet runners or hyacinth beans. Raw they may contain somewhat toxic glucosides.
I wont be eating any poison beans raw.
All beans contain poison raw and I don't think many people know that.

Worth
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Old January 27, 2016   #24
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Dry hyacinth beans are said to have very high levels of cyanogenic glycocides. Some people stay clear of them, some people double boil them changing the water between boils, some people treat them as regular dry beans, etc...

I'd say it's best to really read up on them, if you're going to try them.
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Old January 28, 2016   #25
Zeedman
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Quote:
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Just be cautious about eating uncooked scarlet runners or hyacinth beans. Raw they may contain somewhat toxic glucosides.
The snaps from runner beans are no more toxic raw than those of common snap beans... or I wouldn't be here to post this. I eat a lot of snaps raw as I harvest, provided that the seeds inside are undeveloped (Fortex is really good raw). It is the developed seeds that contain the greatest concentration of toxins, and for beans of the genus Phaseolus (common beans, runner beans, and limas) those toxins are destroyed by cooking. I would second Tormato's caution about eating mature hyacinth beans, though. The same caution would apply to eating jack beans or sword beans.
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Old February 10, 2016   #26
Worth1
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A kind member here (imp) sent me some Isuks wang kong runner bean seeds.
I am going to plant them in small containers today and then transplant them out when they get big.
This way the will have a chance in the cooler weather to do something.
I have looked on lime and the British are the ones to get information from on these things because they are very popular there.
One expert starts them in cups and puts them out when the temperatures are no less than about 53 degrees or so.
My plan is to turn my late Texas winter and early spring into an English summer.
By looking at the long range forecast there shows to be nothing even close to a freeze for the rest of the spring.

Worth
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Old February 11, 2016   #27
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Hello Worth.
I grew runner beans down here in Melbourne and tried to get them to flower before the heat of January-February. An Autumn flowering would work better for my situation as well.
Runner beans make an excellent dried bean too and the seed coat colours are beautiful.

Last edited by kionga; February 11, 2016 at 06:27 AM. Reason: Misspelling
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Old March 7, 2016   #28
Worth1
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The early germinating in the house has paid off.
They are now reaching 3 feet.

Worth
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Old March 9, 2016   #29
Keen101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeedman View Post
The snaps from runner beans are no more toxic raw than those of common snap beans... or I wouldn't be here to post this. I eat a lot of snaps raw as I harvest, provided that the seeds inside are undeveloped (Fortex is really good raw). It is the developed seeds that contain the greatest concentration of toxins, and for beans of the genus Phaseolus (common beans, runner beans, and limas) those toxins are destroyed by cooking. I would second Tormato's caution about eating mature hyacinth beans, though. The same caution would apply to eating jack beans or sword beans.
agreed. eating green unmature pole beans is great. I dont eat the pods. Runner beans can be eaten the same, but their pods are even more tough and fuzzy, but since i don't eat the pods anyway it's all good. Once the beans mature and dry down is when you should pay more attention to chemicals that they produce.
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Old April 13, 2016   #30
Worth1
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It has been awhile since I have visited this thread.
Here is one and the first of my runner bean blooms.
There is no doubt I will get running bean set by planting out early.
They are starting to bloom right after some volunteer pinto beans are blooming.
I was very excited to see this bloom today.
Worth
IMG_20160413_29390.jpg
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