Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating beans, peas, peanuts, clover and vetch.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 21, 2016   #1
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,753
Default Pole Bean Support Ideas

I am going to be building supports for two rows of pole beans. Ideas are very welcome as to a support system.

One row will be 37 feet of Asparagus Yard Long Beans.

The other will be 37 feet with Blue lake Stringless on half and Cherokee Trail of Tears on the other half.

I have the T posts and Rebar to make what the pictures show - except I don't have enough 2x4 fencing. I'll have to run wires/string or make netting. The T posts are 5.5' above ground and the rebar is around 7' above ground.

I should mention that the T Posts are 5' apart - 2 will be 6' apart to make up the 37 total feet.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HNI_0074.JPG (93.5 KB, 215 views)
File Type: jpg HNI_0075.JPG (80.6 KB, 215 views)
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert

Last edited by AlittleSalt; March 21, 2016 at 02:07 PM.
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21, 2016   #2
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 30,634
Default

You can run a tight line from pole to pole top and bottom and then tie string vertical string to each tight line.
It doesn't have to be tight.
It is the cheapest thing I can think of and it will work.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21, 2016   #3
Tormato
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 3,771
Default

I thought everything was bigger in Texas.

Blue Lake S-7 might be the BL to trial in the future. Regular BL gets to about 10-11 feet tall, here. So, it might grow up and then almost all the way back down again, for you. BL S-7 grows to about 7 feet.

In my garden it's 11' bean poles, put ~1 foot into the ground. Most of my pole bean vines get to about 14' in an average year. A poor year is about 10-12', a really good year ~20', which means all the way to the top and almost all the way back down again.
Tormato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21, 2016   #4
timbucktwo
Tomatovillian™
 
timbucktwo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Michigan
Posts: 54
Default Pole Bean Support Ideas

Thought about putting mine on strings attached to the barn eaves from the ground, but wonder which side of the barn to put them on. West side gets the bulk of the 30-50mph winds when we get hit hard, would south be best, or would east get enough sun before p/m?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
timbucktwo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21, 2016   #5
rhines81
Tomatovillian™
 
rhines81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Zone 5b, Poconos
Posts: 523
Default

I did something like what Worth suggested above. I cut myself (4) 12 foot ~1x1 poles out of 2"x6"x12' pressure treated board and spaced them in a 8ft x 2ft rectangle buried about 2ft. At the top, I screwed in more cut 1x1s to connect the vertical poles. Then I just took regular old string and tied it to the top rails to hang down loosely to the ground. The beans just grab those strings and climb to the top. You could do the same using (3) 12'x2' or 12'x3' frames put together. I think my frame with string cost less than $12 and took about an hour to cut and assemble.

Edited: I just went out and looked at my frame, must have only used 8 foot lumber for the verticals, because it is only about 6' high. You would think I would have remembered only from a year ago.

Last edited by rhines81; March 21, 2016 at 07:26 PM. Reason: dimensions
rhines81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 21, 2016   #6
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,753
Default

I was thinking of something a lot like that Worth - just with a couple more horizontal lines.

I went out and measured the rebar and found three pieces 10' long and 3 pieces 8' long. But they are only 3/8" thick. There is a lot of wind here too, and standing on a ladder in our garden isn't wise. The soil is just too loose and friable.

Another question

I'm guessing putting the fence/trellises closer than 4' apart might not be a good idea?

... Which just gave me another idea!

A Pole Bean Tunnel https://www.google.com/search?q=pole...lWCYUQ_AUIBigB
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22, 2016   #7
Tormato
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 3,771
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by timbucktwo View Post
Thought about putting mine on strings attached to the barn eaves from the ground, but wonder which side of the barn to put them on. West side gets the bulk of the 30-50mph winds when we get hit hard, would south be best, or would east get enough sun before p/m?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If the hours of sunlight are about equal, my GUESS is that the east side would be better. Beyond less wind, the early sun helps dry plants earlier in the day, possibly keeping disease away. Some years, here, the dew on the leaves is so heavy in the morning, you would have thought it had just rained. I'm thinking plant a bit later than you would on the west side, because the soil may not warm as much on the east side.
Tormato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22, 2016   #8
Tormato
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 3,771
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhines81 View Post
I did something like what Worth suggested above. I cut myself (4) 12 foot ~1x1 poles out of 2"x6"x12' pressure treated board and spaced them in a 8ft x 2ft rectangle buried about 2ft. At the top, I screwed in more cut 1x1s to connect the vertical poles. Then I just took regular old string and tied it to the top rails to hang down loosely to the ground. The beans just grab those strings and climb to the top. You could do the same using (3) 12'x2' or 12'x3' frames put together. I think my frame with string cost less than $12 and took about an hour to cut and assemble.

Edited: I just went out and looked at my frame, must have only used 8 foot lumber for the verticals, because it is only about 6' high. You would think I would have remembered only from a year ago.
Keep me updated on the string hanging down loosely to the ground. I'm wondering how the vines would do in the wind. I have one variety of pole bean the leaves of which can be 12" long and 10" wide. I'm thinking they would want go sailing if they weren't anchored.
Tormato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22, 2016   #9
Tormato
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 3,771
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
I was thinking of something a lot like that Worth - just with a couple more horizontal lines.

I went out and measured the rebar and found three pieces 10' long and 3 pieces 8' long. But they are only 3/8" thick. There is a lot of wind here too, and standing on a ladder in our garden isn't wise. The soil is just too loose and friable.

Another question

I'm guessing putting the fence/trellises closer than 4' apart might not be a good idea?

... Which just gave me another idea!

A Pole Bean Tunnel https://www.google.com/search?q=pole...lWCYUQ_AUIBigB
A tunnel, or arbor would work great. The worst set-up is actually something vertical. Any structure that leans to one side, generally will have the beans leaning over past the leaves, making them easier to find and pick.
Tormato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22, 2016   #10
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,753
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tormato View Post
A tunnel, or arbor would work great. The worst set-up is actually something vertical. Any structure that leans to one side, generally will have the beans leaning over past the leaves, making them easier to find and pick.
That is good to know Tormato. I'm hoping to get to work on it this coming Friday.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22, 2016   #11
timbucktwo
Tomatovillian™
 
timbucktwo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Michigan
Posts: 54
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tormato View Post
If the hours of sunlight are about equal, my GUESS is that the east side would be better. Beyond less wind, the early sun helps dry plants earlier in the day, possibly keeping disease away. Some years, here, the dew on the leaves is so heavy in the morning, you would have thought it had just rained. I'm thinking plant a bit later than you would on the west side, because the soil may not warm as much on the east side.

Thanks for your thoughts on this, I appreciate it!

Tim


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
timbucktwo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22, 2016   #12
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,753
Default

I just showed my wife the pole bean tunnels. She smiled from ear to ear and said, "You're going to make that...? "

Looks like a weekend project about to begin.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 23, 2016   #13
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,047
Default

You could make arches with cattle tunnels. They look really nice and you should be able to reach the center to pick.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 30, 2016   #14
rdback
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Virginia
Posts: 35
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
I just showed my wife the pole bean tunnels. She smiled from ear to ear and said, "You're going to make that...? "

Looks like a weekend project about to begin.
Are you going to use cattle panels? If you do, the hardest thing to get over is the price (~$20 here) and transporting them home. But, they seem to last. I've had mine up for close to ten years and they still look new.

I had to chuckle when I followed the google link you posted. A a few of MY arch pics popped up, lol.

Best of luck with it! Post some pics.
rdback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 30, 2016   #15
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 30,634
Default

If you do go with an arch go with a Gothic arch.
Much easier to do and the center is taller.
Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:45 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★