Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating beans, peas, peanuts, clover and vetch.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 11, 2017   #16
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 220
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilaGardener View Post
21 Peas went right up a short trellis for me and were quite good as shellies!
Good to know. I will give them a trellis. If they get too unruly, I will pull them up.
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 11, 2017   #17
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,714
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TC_Manhattan View Post
BVV, you're right. Unless you can grow them by the acre, I didn't think they were worth the space. I buy mine from Camellia Brand, from Louisiana. They offer free shipping with a $25 order. I love their Lady Cream peas and Crowders!

Here's a link: http://www.camelliabrand.com/product...-peas-lentils/
Thanks, Crowder's and BE peas are still my favs. Speckled butter beans are good to. I eat a lot of beans from my market, Take em home and like you eat with cornbread, tomtoes, and maybe fried taters. For me it doesn't get much better.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 12, 2017   #18
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,503
Default

Is it just me or has the price of these things skyrocketed.
Over 3 dollars for a pound for crowder peas is unheard of.
Even at the store I cant find them dried and the beams I do see are expensive.
To me they are a source of protein and that is it.
When that protein is more expensive than pork something is wrong big time.
What once was a food of the poor has became a food of the rich.
Yes you can grow cow peas of all kinds but you have to row crop and work at it.
Not something for the small back yard garden for people that have to work all day at another job.
It is one heck of a lot of work.
We used to sit on the porch every day messing with beans and peas shelling them in the summer.
Then there was the canning and so on.
My cousins grow some sort of cow pea every year.
About 50 to 100 acres and they use a combine.
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old February 12, 2017   #19
dustdevil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: WI, USA Zone4
Posts: 1,832
Default

Cowpeas are good in tuna noodle caserole. They are a bit coarser than a regular sweet pea. Be sure to line them up on your butter knife if you eat them by themselves
dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 12, 2017   #20
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,503
Default

I stopped eating tuna due to ethical, environmental and health reasons.
Even I have my limitations.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old February 12, 2017   #21
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 220
Default

Grocery store prices are the reason I started gardening 2 years ago. And yes, Worth, I am appalled at the price of fresh produce, including legumes, at the store. I can get dried pintos and black beans pretty inexpensively because we have a substantial Hispanic population that the local supermarkets cater to. But I like fresh produce during the warmer months and farm stand prices are crazy expensive here. I saw a small package of fresh unshelled Lima beans at the farm stand last summer tagged at a few dollars. Once shelled, it would barely have been a portion for one person. The cowpeas might be more trouble than they are worth, but I'm experimenting with all kinds of crops. I have found a couple things that are very happy here and I want to see what else I can do. At the moment, I am a stay-at-home mom, gardening to supplement my dh's income with food on the table. So I have the time. I wouldn't bother or have the time/energy if I was at work all day. I am amazed at the people on this board that do both. But then again, everyone's situation is different.
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 12, 2017   #22
Deborah
Riding The Crazy Train Again
 
Deborah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Marcos, California
Posts: 2,562
Default

Muddy, that's my dream-a stay-home Mom with a garden!
__________________
"The righteous one cares for the needs of his animal". Proverbs 12:10
Deborah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #23
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 220
Default

Thanks for reminding me how blessed I am, Deborah!
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #24
BigVanVader
Tomatovillian™
 
BigVanVader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Posts: 2,714
Default

Yeah I don't want to discourage anyone. I know a couple in their 70s and they grow a huge garden every year including several types of beans. All comes down to preference and free time.
BigVanVader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #25
TC_Manhattan
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 365
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1
Yes you can grow cow peas of all kinds but you have to row crop and work at it.
Not something for the small back yard garden for people that have to work all day at another job.
It is one heck of a lot of work.
This is why they're $3/lb.
Folks don't buy these for sustenance. They couldn't afford to do so.
We buy these as a novelty, for a once-in-a while treat.

BTW, Dixie speckled butter pea limas and Jackson Wonders are worth growing. I can get a decent yield from a small garden bed and they are really tasty, too.
TC_Manhattan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #26
JohnJones
Tomatovillian™
 
JohnJones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 327
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Is it just me or has the price of these things skyrocketed.
Over 3 dollars for a pound for crowder peas is unheard of.
Even at the store I cant find them dried and the beams I do see are expensive.
To me they are a source of protein and that is it.
When that protein is more expensive than pork something is wrong big time.
What once was a food of the poor has became a food of the rich.
Yes you can grow cow peas of all kinds but you have to row crop and work at it.
Not something for the small back yard garden for people that have to work all day at another job.
It is one heck of a lot of work.
We used to sit on the porch every day messing with beans and peas shelling them in the summer.
Then there was the canning and so on.
My cousins grow some sort of cow pea every year.
About 50 to 100 acres and they use a combine.
Camellia gets a premium price on their products because folks associate them with quality. I catch sales on Kroger brand dried beans for around $1 a lb pretty often and they have a large number of canned beans you can get for 50 cents a can from time to time. Cowpeas are not so common though.

Last edited by JohnJones; February 13, 2017 at 11:40 AM. Reason: spelling
JohnJones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #27
whistech
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Between The Woodlands and Spring, Texas
Posts: 483
Default

I grow cow peas every year in a 4' X 24' raised bed. I plant rows 6 to 8 inches apart and space the peas 4 inches apart in the row. Using this method, I usually pick a 5 gallon bucket of peas and maybe up to 7 gallons about every 2 weeks. I usually get 3 pickings per planting. I am going to try to post some pictures of growing them last year in another post.
__________________
Arlie
whistech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #28
TC_Manhattan
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 365
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by whistech View Post
I grow cow peas every year in a 4' X 24' raised bed. I plant rows 6 to 8 inches apart and space the peas 4 inches apart in the row. Using this method, I usually pick a 5 gallon bucket of peas and maybe up to 7 gallons about every 2 weeks. I usually get 3 pickings per planting. I am going to try to post some pictures of growing them last year in another post.
That sounds do-able!
Do you find better yields with different varieties?
Which varieties do you grow to get that much?
TC_Manhattan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #29
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 10,100
Default

When I see this thread, my first thought is, "How to eat cowpeas" - "With a spoon."
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #30
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,503
Default

Other than the occasional thrashing I guess I was blessed growing up.
We ate like kings.
Giant tow sacks of pecans and peanuts.
Fruit and vegetables of all kinds.
Home grown meat of every kind wild fish and game.
Many years later it still baffles me at the prices in the store.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:23 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★