Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating beans, peas, peanuts, clover and vetch.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 13, 2017   #31
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 30,713
Default

Lest we not forget homemade whisky beer and wine.
Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #32
Deborah
Riding The Crazy Train Again
 
Deborah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Marcos, California
Posts: 2,562
Default

I had to Google to see what cow peas and crowders are. I've never heard of them.
__________________
"The righteous one cares for the needs of his animal". Proverbs 12:10
Deborah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #33
shelleybean
Tomatovillian™
 
shelleybean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Virginia Beach
Posts: 2,566
Default

I grow White Acre peas each summer and I prefer them shelled fresh. I know to pick them when I see purple streaks on the pods, but at that point the pods would be too tough to eat. I do sometimes buy the Pictsweet peas and snaps frozen at the store, off season.

I eat the White Acres out of the garden two ways (besides with a spoon, Salt ). I love them blanched in a tomato salad with some goats cheese, fresh basil and vinaigrette. Or I cook them with some salt pork and a bit of sugar and salt. These are a real treat for me. One of those things I have to grow if I want them. Once in a blue moon I see them sold at the farm stand, specifically White Acre peas. They have black eyed peas all the time but that's not the same. Otherwise, I cannot find them here dried or frozen. They're easy to grow if I can keep the aphids off of them. I look forward to them each year. I'll have a 12 foot row this summer.
__________________
Michele
shelleybean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #34
shelleybean
Tomatovillian™
 
shelleybean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Virginia Beach
Posts: 2,566
Default

Thinking back to the end of last season, at my last picking, as I was getting ready to yank the plants, I did save a few immature pods. That's the only time I've cooked the pods. They're not that big a deal to me. I have a lot of green beans, too, and I'm pretty content just eating those pods. But to each his/her own.
__________________
Michele
shelleybean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #35
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 218
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TC_Manhattan View Post
This is why they're $3/lb.
Folks don't buy these for sustenance. They couldn't afford to do so.
We buy these as a novelty, for a once-in-a while treat.

BTW, Dixie speckled butter pea limas and Jackson Wonders are worth growing. I can get a decent yield from a small garden bed and they are really tasty, too.
I got a good yield of Dixie Speckled Butter Peas. I only planted one row and I got enough for several meals for myself, shared some with a neighbor, and still have some dried beans in the cupboard for stew. I have seeds for pole limas from the Swap that I will plant this summer.
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #36
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 218
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Lest we not forget homemade whisky beer and wine.
Worth
I used to make wine and my dh made the beer. It was good stuff for the most part. But access to fresh grapes/juice is why I stopped making wine. I had a couple contaminated batches. Not worth the effort. My dh still occasionally makes beer for a party. He doesn't do it very often any more because neither of us handle the calories as well in our old age. We have some very good local craft breweries that do a great job when I have a hankerin' for a pint.
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #37
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 218
Default

Thanks, Shelleybean. Those are some good suggestions. The tomato salad sounds very good. I love goat cheese.

I didn't know aphids liked cowpeas. I will watch for that.

Last edited by MuddyToes; February 13, 2017 at 11:10 PM.
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 13, 2017   #38
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 218
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
When I see this thread, my first thought is, "How to eat cowpeas" - "With a spoon."
I knew someone would say that.
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 14, 2017   #39
whistech
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Between The Woodlands and Spring, Texas
Posts: 472
Default

I said yesterday that I would show some pictures of how I grow "cow peas". Probably the most popular cow pea in Texas is black eye peas. I grow Top Pick Pink Eye Purple Hull peas. The Top Pick part of the name indicates that most of the peas grow above the plant so are easier to pick. I find that is not always true but the peas are productive and I really like them.

Here's the peas just starting to grow. You can see I have four rows in the 4' X 24 ' raised bed. Sometimes I will plant 5 rows. It usually takes about 60 days to first harvest.

Peas Started.jpg

Here you can see the peas just before blooming. I use a 6" X 6" plastic netting to keep the peas inside the raised bed.

Purple hull peas growing 1.jpg

Here are the peas blooming and that means peas will be ready to pick in about 2 weeks.

Purple hull peas blooming.jpg

Here's the first harvest. I usually harvest about 3 times and then pull the plants to plant more peas or something else.

Purple hull peas on table.jpg
__________________
Arlie

Last edited by whistech; February 14, 2017 at 12:01 PM.
whistech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 14, 2017   #40
TC_Manhattan
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Ohio
Posts: 359
Default

Wow, Whistech! This is great!

Thanks for posting your photos. Gives me the motivation to try some again.
Last time, I grew Dixie Lee crowders and Red Ripper, and neither were anywhere near as productive as yours!
TC_Manhattan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 14, 2017   #41
MuddyToes
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyToes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Delaware
Posts: 218
Default

Very nice pictures, Whistech! Thank you for posting. Congrats on a great harvest!
MuddyToes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 14, 2017   #42
JohnJones
Tomatovillian™
 
JohnJones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 327
Default

Definitely looks like the way to most efficiently grow PH peas. Great looking harvest. You get that amount 3 times? Would more come if you left them?
JohnJones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 14, 2017   #43
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 30,713
Default

Nice peas.
Would go good with boiled okra.
Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 14, 2017   #44
Rajun Gardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Rajun Gardener's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Lafayette La
Posts: 953
Default

TPPHP are easy to grow and they taste good, I shell them fresh and still light green and I also dry them for seed and eating. Not all are top pick so make sure you get the right variety. The beans on top waving at you make it easy to pick.

Here's the lazy way to grow them. http://www.cookinglouisiana.com/Arti...as_no-till.htm
Rajun Gardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 15, 2017   #45
JohnJones
Tomatovillian™
 
JohnJones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 327
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajun Gardener View Post
TPPHP are easy to grow and they taste good, I shell them fresh and still light green and I also dry them for seed and eating. Not all are top pick so make sure you get the right variety. The beans on top waving at you make it easy to pick.

Here's the lazy way to grow them. http://www.cookinglouisiana.com/Arti...as_no-till.htm
Love it! Y'all are making me want to throw out some seed around my birthday in August.
JohnJones is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:40 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★