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Old March 29, 2017   #1
Gerardo
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Default 2017 Container Garden-Tijuana, Baja California Norte, México

Starting a new thread to document progress.

Some work put in this weekend.

Two ends of my new wires, 4 total, about 5 m length each, 1/8 inch galvanized
one end of the wire.png
the other end of the wire2.png


Here are some trusses and assorted greenery, somewhat muted and upset after getting a dose of Copper fungicide early this AM.

truss1.png

truss2.png

truss3.png

truss4.png

truss5.png

truss 6.png



greenery.png

greenery2.png

greenery3.png

greenery4.png

greenery5.png

global.png



Tumbling Tom doing well in a 1 gallon pot, new home soon.

tumblin t.png

A trio of Pravda
3 pravda.png

Dora, outstanding flavor
dora.png

Fish L. Oxheart, Detskij Sladkij, OR117 (I hope they do great, last year it was like eating mangos)
fishLoxh.detsladj.OR117.png

Fred's TD and others
fredstd and others.png

L to R, Fred's TD, Bushy Chab., Czech Bush
fredstd.bushych.czecb.png

Gribovsky sharing home with Pink Gaetano
gribov and pgaetano.png

Harding x Choc Cherry
hardingxCCherry.png

MoCross Elgin 9
mo cros elgin9.png

More dwarfs
more dwarfs.png

More koroleva
more more more.png

MX Midget, Gribovsky, and lots of peppers
mx midg gribov peppers.png

koroleva with Donkey Ears and Serrano (overwintered)
qoroleva w peppers1.png

rest of the row
rest of the row.png

Stormin Normin, what beautiful trusses you have
stormin normin.png

Pepper seeds I rescued from a tray mishap, they germinated better than their tray coddled counterparts, and show nice vigor despite being out at nights from day 1.

Separating these shortly, with careful dissection of the roots to minimize shock.

Some rare ones in here, all will be labeled Chile Misterio, which in another context can be read as unknown father.
stray peppers.png

Detskij Sladkij, Sladjik Ponchik waiting for new home, a pepper and Tastywines on the right.
strays sladj detsj.png

Sweet Pepper, vigorous little plants. Can't wait to taste these and save seeds.
sweet pepper.png

Syrian Goat Horn
syrian goat horn.png

Last edited by Gerardo; March 30, 2017 at 01:03 AM.
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Old March 30, 2017   #2
Deborah
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How on earth do you find the time to care for them all? And have a life? Impressive!
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Old March 30, 2017   #3
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Gerardo, how many varieties of tomatoes and how many varieties of peppers do you have growing at the moment? Just amazing.
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Old March 30, 2017   #4
ginger2778
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I can't get over all the work! And you never seem to get tired!
I haven’t tried Storming Norman, I did try Sinister Minister, it's brother. That was a great little cherry. Reverend Michael Keyes is another MF from that line, I am growing this current season, excellent.

Beautiful and enviable as usual. Sadly my tomato plants are starting to wind down but the mangoes pineapples, and bananas are cranking up fast.
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Old March 30, 2017   #5
Gerardo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deborah View Post
How on earth do you find the time to care for them all? And have a life? Impressive!
Thanks Deb, I work from my computer, so after a few hours of screen time I do an hour or two of garden work, keeps my head from exploding.

Quote:
Originally Posted by efisakov View Post
Gerardo, how many varieties of tomatoes and how many varieties of peppers do you have growing at the moment? Just amazing.
I haven't done a tally yet, just growing the things I like ad hoc. Guesstimating, I'd say about 140 tomato plants and 40 peppers. I still have room for some more, and then there's the cukes to consider. Gonna be a busy spring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
I can't get over all the work! And you never seem to get tired!
I haven’t tried Storming Norman, I did try Sinister Minister, it's brother. That was a great little cherry. Reverend Michael Keyes is another MF from that line, I am growing this current season, excellent.

Beautiful and enviable as usual. Sadly my tomato plants are starting to wind down but the mangoes pineapples, and bananas are cranking up fast.
Cool to hear it's from the same line Marsha 'cause I enjoyed RMK. I do get tired, it's just that gardening substitutes for gym time.

A few questions Marsha, since you are our FL ambassador.

How many months do you have to shut down due to heat?
Do only the tropicals grow during that period?
Do people still grow things in controlled environments?

Last edited by Gerardo; April 1, 2017 at 11:06 AM.
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Old March 30, 2017   #6
AKmark
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Nice work, I hope you have a fantastic crop, lots of flavors in there.
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Old March 30, 2017   #7
Jimbotomateo
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Love it all Gerardo!. Glad you have the energy to create and maintain that great garden environment! I have four fence posts and would like to copy your cable system. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, . Jimbo
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Old March 30, 2017   #8
Gerardo
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Nice work, I hope you have a fantastic crop, lots of flavors in there.
Thanks Mark, lots of variety and with some staggered plantings the crop should start in July and continue into December.

BTW, my Odoriko from the same packet have not come up and it's been 14+ days. I may have sent you duds.
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Old March 30, 2017   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerardo View Post
Thanks Deb, I work from my computer, so after a few hours of screen time I do an hour or two of garden work, keeps my head from exploding.



I haven't done a tally yet, I just growing the things I like ad hoc. Guesstimating, I'd say about 140 tomato plants and 40 peppers. I still have room for some more, and then there's the cukes to consider. Gonna be a busy spring.



Cool to hear it's from the same line Marsha 'cause I enjoyed RMK. I do get tired, it's just that gardening substitutes for gym time.

A few questions Marsha, since you are our FL ambassador.

How many months do you have to shut down due to heat?
Do only the tropicals grow during that period?
Do people still grow things in controlled environments?
Usually every tomato is done by June, then I am starting new seeds at around the last week August, so 2 months? Cucumbers, chard and Okra do very well in the heat, and peppers limp along producing a little. Diehards even grow Everglades tomatoes here in the summer, they will set fruit, sparingly. I can't be bothered, it takes about 20 to make a spoonful, and the stem end skin tears when you pick them.
Some people grow in greenhouses that they actually air conditioning, but those are the pro growers. I would hate to see their electric bill, lol!
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Old March 30, 2017   #10
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Great pics
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Old March 30, 2017   #11
Gerardo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbotomateo View Post
Love it all Gerardo!. Glad you have the energy to create and maintain that great garden environment! I have four fence posts and would like to copy your cable system. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, . Jimbo
It's pretty simple to hook up. The only tip I can offer is to use vise grips for the initial stringing up. That is to say, after you've created your 1st loop on one end and are starting the process on the other end, put the wire through the eye and then hold it there with a good pair of vise grips.

The vise grips will hold the wire taut while you apply the wire rope clamps, allowing you to get it nice and tight.

My materials were cheap, as I bought some things on the US side and the metalworks on the MX side.

The wood was at a decent price, untreated for 77 pesos, about 4.50 USD. The buried-cemented end I doused with diesel to prolong the life a bit, probably won't make a difference.

Ironically, cement mix is cheaper in the US, so I went with the $3-4 quickrete for 90 lbs, used up 3 bags for 8 poles.

The wire itself was 11 pesos per meter, so about 60 cents USD per yard.

The closed loops were about 50 cents USD, and the most expensive item was the tensioner, running a whopping 57.40, which comes out to 3 USD.

It's relatively simple to install, and if you're tool oriented, I don't foresee you having any issues.
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Old March 30, 2017   #12
Gerardo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
Usually every tomato is done by June, then I am starting new seeds at around the last week August, so 2 months? Cucumbers, chard and Okra do very well in the heat, and peppers limp along producing a little. Diehards even grow Everglades tomatoes here in the summer, they will set fruit, sparingly. I can't be bothered, it takes about 20 to make a spoonful, and the stem end skin tears when you pick them.
Some people grow in greenhouses that they actually air conditioning, but those are the pro growers. I would hate to see their electric bill, lol!
Good to hear. I'm considering a move to more tropical climates so I may join you in your Caribbean heat endeavors.

Those electric bills must be something.

Are there flowers that do well during those two months?

PS. copper has been working out great, I only fried them once when I got a little too generous with the blue stuff. At 50 to 75% strength, it's awesome.

Last edited by Gerardo; March 30, 2017 at 02:05 PM.
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Old March 30, 2017   #13
Gerardo
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Great pics
Thank you!
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Old March 30, 2017   #14
Jimbotomateo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerardo View Post
It's pretty simple to hook up. The only tip I can offer is to use vise grips for the initial stringing up. That is to say, after you've created your 1st loop on one end and are starting the process on the other end, put the wire through the eye and then hold it there with a good pair of vise grips.

The vise grips will hold the wire taut while you apply the wire rope clamps, allowing you to get it nice and tight.

My materials were cheap, as I bought some things on the US side and the metalworks on the MX side.

The wood was at a decent price, untreated for 77 pesos, about 4.50 USD. The buried-cemented end I doused with diesel to prolong the life a bit, probably won't make a difference.

Ironically, cement mix is cheaper in the US, so I went with the $3-4 quickrete for 90 lbs, used up 3 bags for 8 poles.

The wire itself was 11 pesos per meter, so about 60 cents USD per yard.

The closed loops were about 50 cents USD, and the most expensive item was the tensioner, running a whopping 57.40, which comes out to 3 USD.

It's relatively simple to install, and if you're tool oriented, I don't foresee you having any issues.
That's cheating Gerardo . Wish I could pop over the border and score some stuff.. Materials I mean.. That tensioner price blows my mind! . Never would have thought of vise grips. I haven't used mine in years.. Thanks . Jimbo
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Old March 31, 2017   #15
TexasTycoon
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Gerardo, your garden is always so impressive. Can't wait to see how the season fares for you. Thanks for sharing!
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