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Old July 26, 2017   #1
jillian
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Default Today's pepper pickings

This year's peppers have just gone crazy. It's been extremely hot and humid for about a month now which I am thinking delayed ripening of the Golden Treasures. I decided to go ahead and harvest the largest of them from 3 plants. You wouldn't know they aren't yellow by tasting.....they're delicious.
I will remember this for next year.

I don't know what to attribute it to but peppers are more prolific and larger this year, sweet peppers taste sweeter and hot peppers are hotter. Same varieties i always grow. Glad I don't grow peppers any hotter than jalapeños and lemon drop, I couldn't take it! I have learned to pick the Padrons when they are small or they are too hot for my liking.

Just a few pics, took some of the plants after I finished picking. Now I'm off to prepare some peppers for the freezer.

Sorry for the sideways pics, again.
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Old July 26, 2017   #2
AlittleSalt
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That's a lot of good looking peppers.
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Old July 26, 2017   #3
Worth1
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That's a lot of good looking peppers.
No kidding.
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Old July 26, 2017   #4
dmforcier
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Really happy looking plants. Well done. But try to control yourself and let some ripen!
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Old July 26, 2017   #5
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Jillian, I looked up the 7 day weather forecast for Charlotte, NC. Highs in the mid eighties and lows in the mid sixties and around 70. I don't know what part of the state you are in, but if your temperatures are around that same range - that's perfect weather for growing peppers in.

You most likely already know this, but peppers/chilies are actually tropical. They will grow and produce in hotter regions, but high temperatures will produce peppers that taste hotter/spicier. It's possible you may have producing peppers for couple more months - as long as the weather cooperates.

Peppers are one of my favorite things to grow. One of the reasons my Tomatoville avatar is Tabasco peppers.
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Old July 27, 2017   #6
My Foot Smells
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Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers;
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked;
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?



You will be in peppers heaven until frost it appears. Fall crop should be a whopper. Don't forget to stuff a few before you chunk them in the freezer.
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Old July 27, 2017   #7
jillian
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Lol myfootsmells, how much is a peck I have often wondered!

Thanks everyone! I did save a few peppers for fresh eating and cooking, would any of you like to share your favorite stuffed peppers recipes? I have only done the jalapeno poppers.

I counted the GT, 46 peppers from 3 plants. They were bursting out the cages and also some type of worm had discovered a couple of them. There are new peppers forming so I just went ahead and harvested. Now the plants can put their energy into producing more peppers, I will let those turn yellow But honestly even though green they are very sweet. Just not as pretty. I read an article from Cornell University on delayed ripening of tomatoes due to hot temps, thought maybe peppers are affected same way.
Not sure but here it is https://cvp.cce.cornell.edu/submission.php?id=91

Salt, I am midway between Charlotte and Asheville. The last couple of days have brought some relief, clouds and not as humid. The month of July has been more like what our August weather is. Highs mid 90's , heat index 105-110. Miserable, I don't know how you Texans cope.

Worth, I am loving the Fresno peppers which you kindly sent me seeds for.
A bit milder than jalapeno, with an awesome flavor, slightly sweet. I didn't plant any of the Arbor this year and I miss it. For sure next year!

Thanks again guys, happy pepper growing to all!
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Old July 27, 2017   #8
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A peck is 2.327 US liquid gallons or 1/4 bushel.

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Old July 27, 2017   #9
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Not seeing Fresno in the store this year.
I don't guess they sold enough.
Immigrant Mexicans are fickle and from what I have seen not adventurous when it comes to food.
Same boring bland food day in and day out.
Reminds me of the farmer food growing up.
I was blessed with the mother I had and food.
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Old July 27, 2017   #10
jillian
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Quote:
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A peck is 2.327 US liquid gallons or 1/4 bushel.

Worth
I guess I picked a couple of pecks then lol, my brown grocery bag was filled to the top and tore open before I got up the hill

Your Mother sounds like she was a remarkable woman, I am thinking you got your culinary talents honest!
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Old July 27, 2017   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jillian View Post
Salt, I am midway between Charlotte and Asheville. The last couple of days have brought some relief, clouds and not as humid. The month of July has been more like what our August weather is. Highs mid 90's , heat index 105-110. Miserable, I don't know how you Texans cope.
Thanks again guys, happy pepper growing to all!
Your pepper plants love those temperatures. They will grow and produce just fine.
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Old July 27, 2017   #12
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jillian View Post
I guess I picked a couple of pecks then lol, my brown grocery bag was filled to the top and tore open before I got up the hill

Your Mother sounds like she was a remarkable woman, I am thinking you got your culinary talents honest!
I'm honestly better than the sum of both my parents and they admitted it.
What can I say.
The last time I saw my mother alive I cooked the meal, I was 20 year old.
Then I took off to Texas to seek my fortune.
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Old July 27, 2017   #13
jillian
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Salt, I hadn't paid any attention to your avatar, had no idea it was tobacco peppers!
I haven't grown those, are they your favorite? I sure hope your peppers are faring much better than your tomatoes this year.
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Old July 27, 2017   #14
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Jillian, Tabasco peppers are way hotter than Jalapenos. They are a beautiful plant that is both ornamental and the peppers are tasty, but hot. Jalapenos are around 2,500 - 5,000 Scoville units - depending on the variety they can be much hotter. Tabasco is generally between 30,000 and 50,000 Scoville units.

However, they do produce a beautiful plant with peppers of yellow, orange, and red peppers that last a long time. They could be used as a tall long lasting ornamental in the background in a flower bed.
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Old July 28, 2017   #15
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Peppers can be stuffed with most anything you like, even somewhat sweet fillings. Used to know a lady would chop up raisins and mix them with a bit of cream cheese, then bread the peppers and fry them off like a chile rellano. Surprisingly good, but odd.

I like to make rellanos with a mix of ground or finely diced spiced meats, onions and cheese. Bread them, fry them, then arrange in a baking pan and our a little enchilada sauce over them, add even more cheese. Melt that in the oven - yum.
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