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Discussion forum for the various methods and structures used for getting an early start on your growing season, extending it for several weeks or even year 'round.

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Old February 3, 2016   #31
Worth1
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Worth, I'll help you.
Just need an SASE to Texas LOL.
Right.

It looked good on paper but when I started to put it together it was huge.
Something like 15 feet or so at the peak with ten foot sides.
But I think I can do it by myself I have yet another plan.
I will use an A frame lever hoist thing and tie a rope to the other side to keep it from coming all the way over.

It is made out of 3/4 ridged conduit.

Worth
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Old February 3, 2016   #32
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I'm sorry this post has been hijacked by me, I'll shut up now...
Apologies sent...
No worries. It's all good information.
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Old February 5, 2016   #33
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http://www.buildmyowngreenhouse.com/...onnectors.aspx

I was pondering an Eliot Coleman Scissor door. It's just two pieces of pipe hinged at the end peak. They now sell a "bottom latch," but it looks like it clamps to a baseboard end pipe I don't have.

The door is a neat concept, but I'm not sure about securing and anchoring everything, both when closed and open. The swing of the doors is confusing. Trying to make it all workable and secure on a windy day sounds challenging.

Last edited by Cole_Robbie; February 5, 2016 at 10:29 AM.
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Old February 5, 2016   #34
Gerardo
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PVC strip door? It is hand's free.
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Old February 5, 2016   #35
Cole_Robbie
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I would think the strips would fly everywhere in the wind.
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Old February 5, 2016   #36
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Cole,

Are you considering roll-up sides for use in the Summer?

I was just reading my copy of The Hoophouse (High Tunnel) Handbook. The folks at GrowingForMarket have a lot of great material on high tunnels. I have reviewed a few different designs for roll-up sides. I think it can be done quite easily but I am not sure if that fits in with your plans for usage.

Let me know if you want details.

Bill
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Old February 5, 2016   #37
Cole_Robbie
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My first greenhouse had roll-up sides. I agree they are very important. I never did get the bar to not sag, though. I don't know what I was doing wrong. I went without the bar and rolling part for the high tunnel. I just hold the plastic up with rope or bungee cords when I want them up. Sand bags hold them down when they are down. It helps to weave batten cord through the space so the wind can't push the plastic out from the sand bags.
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Old February 5, 2016   #38
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My first greenhouse had roll-up sides. I agree they are very important. I never did get the bar to not sag, though. I don't know what I was doing wrong. I went without the bar and rolling part for the high tunnel. I just hold the plastic up with rope or bungee cords when I want them up. Sand bags hold them down when they are down. It helps to weave batten cord through the space so the wind can't push the plastic out from the sand bags.
Woven, UV greenhouse curtain material is a must for durable roll up sides. A MUST! It will last for years with no issues.
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Old February 5, 2016   #39
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I did learn that if one uses an inflated double layer, to not double the poly that rolls up. It doesn't get inflated, so it rubs against itself and turns cloudy.

I'm coming into year 5 for my 3-5 year rated greenhouse poly in my first structure. I'm hoping to get through one more year. The weak part of the plastic is where it was heat-seamed at the factory. Those seams are the first part to go.
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Old February 5, 2016   #40
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After year 5 it shatters into.---100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,00 0,000,pieces.

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Old February 5, 2016   #41
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Nah, that's painter's plastic. For the actual greenhouse plastic itself, I bet I could get 10+ years. But it falls apart at the seams. I could probably get away with just running 2x4s where it is seamed to re-attach it where it is separating.
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Old February 5, 2016   #42
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Cole can you tell me what kind you have and how thick.
Is it polyethylene.
I think why you are getting good results is because you live farther north than me but yet at a low altitude.
This has a lot to do with how long it will last.
I am asking because the add for the 6mil I looked at said 4 years even in high UV areas.
That it s me.
This stuff also said not to put it against PVC pipe.

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Old February 5, 2016   #43
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http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies...oductId=416869

It's 6-mil. The UV inhibitor that they put into it is stronger than the process they use to make the seams.

And yes, pvc pipe will eat poly, so will treated lumber. White latex paint as a barrier is the answer.


edit: I just noticed that link says: UV stabilized for up to four years of film life.

They must have been talking about the seams and not the plastic.

Last edited by Cole_Robbie; February 5, 2016 at 10:02 PM.
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Old February 5, 2016   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies...oductId=416869

It's 6-mil. The UV inhibitor that they put into it is stronger than the process they use to make the seams.

And yes, pvc pipe will eat poly, so will treated lumber. White latex paint as a barrier is the answer.


edit: I just noticed that link says: UV stabilized for up to four years of film life.

They must have been talking about the seams and not the plastic.

I bought the exact same film. I am on year 4 and it appears to be in good shape. Mine even lays against cattle panels and yet it still holds up. I have had just a few minor tears and I jump on those with repair tape before they expand.
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Old February 5, 2016   #45
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It's been good for raising bedding plants to sell. I chose a different product for the high tunnel, Warp's is the brand. It is an opaque plastic, not clear. It does not have as much "solar oven value", which I need in the very early spring when starting young plants, but quickly becomes a cooling burden in hot weather. Once the temperature hits the 90s, the clear plastic is miserable to be under, even with the greenhouse ends and sides open. The opaque plastic diffuses the light and is much better for growing tomatoes in hot weather.

Last edited by Cole_Robbie; February 5, 2016 at 11:28 PM.
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