Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 2 Weeks Ago   #1
epenna
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 14
Default Low Nitrogen... Urea application

I am growing in 15 gallon containers.

The tomatoes are not as thriving as I had hoped, so I ran a soil test, and was amazed to find that while I have high levels of K and P, I have virtually no nitrogen in the soil.

I was very surprised, since I have been using a balanced fertilizer... so I ordered Urea, which is 46-0-0. The directions say to sprinkle it atop the dirt, but I worry about it burning... has any one had results dissolving in water and using it for watering?

I am also in the process of lowering the ph from 7.5 to 6, in case that changes your advice.

Thanks,

E
epenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2 Weeks Ago   #2
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,737
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by epenna View Post
I am growing in 15 gallon containers.

The tomatoes are not as thriving as I had hoped, so I ran a soil test, and was amazed to find that while I have high levels of K and P, I have virtually no nitrogen in the soil.

I was very surprised, since I have been using a balanced fertilizer... so I ordered Urea, which is 46-0-0. The directions say to sprinkle it atop the dirt, but I worry about it burning... has any one had results dissolving in water and using it for watering?

I am also in the process of lowering the ph from 7.5 to 6, in case that changes your advice.

Thanks,

E
Most people use CaNO3 with a high K fertilizer. I have not tried every method out there of course.
There are a few of us here, and I also have local farmer friends who follow Hydro Gardens methods, you can find that info in our threads. Get some Phosphoric Acid to drop your pH
AKmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2 Weeks Ago   #3
UFXEFU
Tomatovillian™
 
UFXEFU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Gloster, Lousiana 71030 Zone 8a
Posts: 243
Default

Wow.... that’s 46% N. You are not going to need much in a 15 gallon container.

UFXEFU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #4
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,030
Default

Read here:
https://www.agprofessional.com/artic...soil-ph-levels

Also, add it with every watering, don't dump too much at once. First, nitrogen can leach easily (probably what has happened to you), and second is that ammonium can be a bit toxic to plants in high concentration.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #5
brownrexx
Tomatovillian™
 
brownrexx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Southeastern PA
Posts: 860
Default

Most soil tests do not test Nitrogen in the soil because it is so volatile. Almost any lab soil test will recommend adding Nitrogen.

I do not garden in containers but I am side dressing with feather meal this year and it is 12-0-0. It is the first time I have used it so I can't say how well it will work.

Anyone who adds fertilizers on a regular basis, even compost, will most likely see high levels of P and K in their soil which is why I do not add additional fertilizer.

However, remember I am gardening in ground so my nutrients do not leach out like I think that they do in containers.
brownrexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #6
epenna
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 14
Default

I looked a round on the internet, and the recommendation seems to be 1 or 2 Tbls per gallon of water as a foliar feed or a fertilizer.

Will try it out and report back.

Thanks, all.

E
epenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #7
epenna
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 14
Default

It has been five days since I watered with 2 tbsp or urea per gallon of water, and the results have been dramatic!

The plants have all flushed a deep green. So far, so good!

E
epenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #8
PaulF
Tomatovillian™
 
PaulF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Brownville, Ne
Posts: 2,725
Default

As soon as blossoming begins, back off the high N a little. An application once every ten days or so will work for containers. As you water, like zipcode says, you will flush out nutrients including the P and K. The you can begin a weekly application of the balanced fertilizer. During blossom and fruit set, lower N amounts and higher P and K is usually suggested. N will cause wonderful greening and lots of vine but no fruit.
__________________
there's two things money can't buy; true love and home grown tomatoes.
PaulF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #9
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 33,851
Default

Just to add, 'Urea will not work in dead soil from what I have read.
I requires organisms in the soil to break it down for plants to use.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
If Count Dracula grow tomatoes they would be black tomatoes.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #10
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 3,658
Default

don't forget too much nitrogen will yield wonderful looking tomato plants with no blossoms, too. go easy on it.
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #11
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,737
Default

This may be worth reading.

https://nrcca.cals.cornell.edu/nutri...CA2_print.html
AKmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Week Ago   #12
epenna
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Glendale, CA
Posts: 14
Default

Thanks again for all the info, everyone!

Most of the plants have already set fruit, but were looking yellowish... additionally, several of the plants have not grown much in the last month, and since I am in southern California and the growing season is long and scorchy, I would prefer that they spend the next few weeks bulking up their leaves, for a longer season overall.

I applied a mulch tea about a month ago, and that may be why the soil is active and made the urea available. Also, the PH is a little high, and I am trying to bring it down with diluted vinegar.

Here's a question... I am trying to get the roots to grow strong to the bottom of the containers, so I am being careful to not drown them, which I may have done last season. So now I am in a situation where the top half of the container can get pretty dry while the bottom half stays wet (I put both perlite and vermiculite in the mix, so it drains well, but still retains water.) As a result, I am staggering the watering to allow the top half to dry out, and so encourage root growth... but this is leading to fruit cracking on the larger tomatoes as a result of this feast or famine watering. Is this a sign that the roots are not penetrating to the wet soil below or is this just the price of growing the roots, and later in the season I will be able to water more regularly and avoid so much cracking?
epenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:54 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★