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Old January 11, 2021   #16
PaulF
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I always spray a 10% solution of bleach on the tomato cages both in the fall and spring since EB pathogens will live on metal and wood over the winter. I do not spray my soil since that will only kill the surface and pathogens go deeper into the soil.

I used to use fabric as a mulch base and it worked very well, but since I rearranged my garden layout every year I had to pull up, store and re-lay the fabric every year. The fabric only lasted a couple of years before replacement. That's why I went to paper and straw. Besides, I till it all in for extra organics.

Garden sanitation is another solution and like Bill I remove all diseased leaves during the growing season and also all garden debris both during the year and at the end of the season.
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Old January 12, 2021   #17
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If you want to move the garden, do it only if the new place gets the same (or more) sun, especially morning sun. Debris left overwinter is only a secondary concern to the growing conditions in the case of these foliar diseases.
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Old January 12, 2021   #18
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Originally Posted by MrBig46 View Post
Thanks for your comment. I've read it from you a few times, but I don't remember diluting the hypochlorite. Could you mention it here again. I'm thinking of spraying my black fabrics before the season for sure, which I use repeatedly.
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Instead of trying to explain it all again I have the link for the main thread on using bleach as a foliage spray.
http://tomatoville.com/showthread.ph...t=bleach+spray

Basically you have to adjust the strength of the dilution based on the sodium hypochlorite in the bleach you have available. It is not the be all and end all of dealing with foliage problems but it can be an important and effective tool when used promptly when needed.

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Old January 12, 2021   #19
MrBig46
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Instead of trying to explain it all again I have the link for the main thread on using bleach as a foliage spray.
http://tomatoville.com/showthread.ph...t=bleach+spray

Basically you have to adjust the strength of the dilution based on the sodium hypochlorite in the bleach you have available. It is not the be all and end all of dealing with foliage problems but it can be an important and effective tool when used promptly when needed.

Bill
Thanks for the link. I found it and wrote it down for sure.
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Old January 15, 2021   #20
Tillerman
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Many diseases including blights and wilts are soil borne and are transmitted by direct contact of leaves with soil. Water splashing on bare soil sends dirt onto leaves and the spores are in place. Any stressed plant is then more susceptible than a stronger plant. As tomatoes age over the growing season they weaken from reproduction and disease is more frequent. Certain varieties also are more susceptible than others.

An important safeguard to soil borne diseases like blights and wilts is a good mulching program. A barrier between soil and plant will go far in reducing disease. I use newspaper as a first layer and straw on top of that. After having tried several different combinations, for me this has reduced disease tremendously. My garden is so small it is impossible to rotate the crops enough that there is no overlap. I credit mulch with successful reduction in pathogen transmission...not elimination, but great reduction.
Thank you. From what I read with extension and other sources it seems to be primarily soil-borne; so, your approach makes sense. I have the ability to more the garden as much as 50+ feet, so it should be fine. I've also located a few resistant varieties, such as Chef's Choice, Mountain Rouge and Old Brooks, so we will se.
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Old January 15, 2021   #21
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If you want to move the garden, do it only if the new place gets the same (or more) sun, especially morning sun. Debris left overwinter is only a secondary concern to the growing conditions in the case of these foliar diseases.
Thank you. I agree about the benefit of morning sun. Over the years, my original spot for tomatoes became more shaded in the morning, but sun from noon-sunset. I finally understood that it was due to the rapid growth of my cedars that line the property on the east side. Moving the plot further west solved that problem. I have the advantage of having some acreage, so that I can move it.
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Old January 15, 2021   #22
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I've also located a few resistant varieties, such as Chef's Choice, Mountain Rouge and Old Brooks, so we will se.
I have grown each of those varieties and they are no more resistant than any other variety in a home garden. Maybe a couple days more resistant but not enough to really make a difference unless you have 400 acres planted and a couple days lets you get your harvest in to save the farm.

For most of us cultural practices make more difference that any resistances bred into a tomato. Chef's Choice and the Mountain Series being hybrid have the resistance bred in. Old Brooks is an older commercial open pollenated variety (one of my favorite varieties). They may be listed as being resistant but not so anyone could notice any different than any other variety. Grow what sounds ands and tastes good I say.
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Old January 16, 2021   #23
Milan HP
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I have grown each of those varieties and they are no more resistant than any other variety in a home garden. Maybe a couple days more resistant but not enough to really make a difference unless you have 400 acres planted and a couple days lets you get your harvest in to save the farm.

For most of us cultural practices make more difference that any resistances bred into a tomato. Chef's Choice and the Mountain Series being hybrid have the resistance bred in. Old Brooks is an older commercial open pollenated variety (one of my favorite varieties). They may be listed as being resistant but not so anyone could notice any different than any other variety. Grow what sounds ands and tastes good I say.
I am not sure if what I am going to say also applies to alternaria (early blight), as my greatest problem has always been phythophthora (late blight), but focusing on resistant varieties pays off. There's one problem though. If the seller says a variety is resistant, it may or may not be quite true. Resistance sells seeds. It's really necessary to verify the claims.

I had a serious problem with lb last year. I don't use any chemical prevention and the result was that if I hadn't had lb resistant varieties (Mountain Magic, Crimson Crush, Cocktail Crush) my season would have finished at the beginning of September. The resistant ones lasted until the first frost, i.e. the beginning of November. I still have a few tomatoes ripening in my pantry at the moment. And the taste? Now it's nothing special, but in the summer and fall they were excellent - nine on a scale 0 - 10.

Yes, alternaria is not as deadly as phythophthora and yes, my climate conditions are different from those in Missouri. However, looking for resistant cultivars is not a bad idea. They can save your day.
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Old January 16, 2021   #24
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Old January 16, 2021   #25
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It is strange that Early Blight happens late in the season for me and Late Blight is an early season disease. Early Blight occurs as the plant ages and is under more stress after fruiting is almost done and is a progressive pathogen usually starting at the bottom foliage and works its way up.

Thank goodness I have never had a problem with Late Blight which will destroy a tomato plant in a matter of days and is very contagious jumping from plant to plant quickly and easily.

It may be just me but the few times I have grown hybrids they seem to be the only plants susceptible to disease during the growing season, particularly with blights and wilts. Maybe as well as resistance bred in they also have susceptibility bred in as well. It seems that what many people say about OPs being less resistant and hybrids more resistant to pathogens, it works just the opposite for me. Maybe that is why very few hybrids find their way into my gardens.
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Old January 16, 2021   #26
Milan HP
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I assume that this lore turned upside down is the result of hybrids being crossbred mainly for taste, color or some other reasons. It was not very long ago that breeders started to pay more attention to resistance. Actually, here in Europe I had trouble finding any lb resistant varieties as recently as in 2017. Since then though, the number of resistant hybrids has risen multifold. And also their quality in taste and yield. Personally, I'd rather put up with a bit less tasty tomato than with the view of my tomato garden going to the dogs. It's terribly depressing, especially because you know there's nothing you can do about it.
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Old January 21, 2021   #27
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I've had all blights and wilts. I bought plastic grow boxes with bagged soil, put them on the concrete drive 300' away from the garden, and still had problems so I determined I definitely had airborne as well. Last yr. I cleared a small area on the edge of the woods where nothing has ever grown but weeds. I laid a black round 10' dia. trampoline bottom down, cut 5, 6" square holes, and planted 5 of the plants that I have the best luck with, Juliet, Jet Star, Super Sonic, Big Beef and Celebrity. I wait till end of May because of our cool damp nights. I get 6-7 hours of sun and had no problems. I did water a little because the black tarp really cooked the ground. I didn't get a big amount of tomatoes but the plants looked good and went till frost.
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