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Historical background information for varieties handed down from bygone days.

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Old February 6, 2011   #16
bughunter99
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That's interesting.
This will be my fourth year growing Chocolate Stripes and I've found it to be vigorous and essentially no maintenance. I haven't had disease problems with it and I've found the fruits to be delicious. They are gorgeous on a plate too!

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Old February 7, 2011   #17
JoAnne
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I've grown Chocolate Stripe for 2 yrs now and have had very good luck with it. Last year, it was one of my healthiest plants and kept putting out gorgeous tasty tomatoes. In fact, just last week, DH and I ate the last of our fresh tomatoes, and Chocolate Stripe was outstanding - in February!
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Old July 10, 2011   #18
Keiththibodeaux
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I grew Chocolate Stripes this year, and gave some seedlings away. All agreed it was one of the best tasting tomatoes we've had in years. It did go early with heat, but I'll grow this one every spring and take what I can get.
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Old August 24, 2011   #19
ebennett
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I have chocolate stripes in the garden this year, but nothing ripe yet. Didn't know it was so buggy. Nice pic, btw. That's either a very small child or some very large tomatoes.
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Old August 24, 2011   #20
kygreg
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Both Chocolate Stripes and Dark Chocolate Stripes have been very vigorous plants in this my first year of growing them. CS has been very productive. DCS is less productive but larger fruits. The photo is some green and ripening Chocolate Stripes about 3 weeks ago.
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Old November 16, 2012   #21
Richard Hefley
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I am writing about big and colorful tomatos, and chocolate stripes is one. Did they produce well for you? and, did you eat them by the slice, or as part of a dish?
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Old February 1, 2013   #22
Gardenboy
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Default Chocolate Stripes

Been growing Chocolate Stripes for years. It is ONE of my top 10 favorites for our FL winter climate. The warmer the weather, the darker the stripes are. I love the green gel inside as well makes for a pretty cut tomato. It does have an "earthy" taste to it and very juicy and FULL of seeds. I have only had some BER early on this tomato but not many diseases as others have posted. The plant did outgrow the BER later in season. Had some tomatoes close to 1lb this season. I have lots of seeds saved if anyone would like to try them.
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Old May 25, 2013   #23
Tom Wagner
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Just now getting around to read the comments about CHOCOLATE STRIPES. I saved seed from it last year from a fruit given me. I didn't know much about it and now that I read that my creation..SCHIMMEIG CREG....was involved somehow in the pedigree, I had to make a comment or two.

I thought that one of my striped tomatoes was involved but I doubt if a pink tomato was the other parent, one just doesn't get brown/black/chocolate from that source. Crossing a Schimmeig Creg with another brown/black or a green flesh tomato would come up with that coloring that Chocolate Stripes has. The other fact about the striping is that I feel that most of the improved striping of tomatoes came from a single collection I made in Ames, Iowa in the 1960's. The striping of that collection was not good by today's standards and it was improved through the many crosses and recombinations that I made to fix the trait. This improved striping exists in the early varieties I created...Green Zebra, Schimmeig Stoo, Elberta Girl, etc.



thanks to Heike and Reinhard 2006 Gartentagbuch


Schimmeig Creg was bred for the beauty and firmness and was designed to be a canning tomato on the family farm near Lancaster, Kansas. The flavor was from a selection from the USDA, or make that the seemingly lack of flavor. It was still good enough for what our family needing in canning whole tomatoes, juicing and ketchup. I also was after a type of mechanical harvest friendly tomato....jointless pedicels, thick walls, few locules.....etc.


A cross I would like to make soon is one between Chocolate Stripes and Chocolate Blues..which is unrelated but a chocolate colored stripe with blue shoulders.


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Old May 25, 2013   #24
carolyn137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Wagner View Post
Just now getting around to read the comments about CHOCOLATE STRIPES. I saved seed from it last year from a fruit given me. I didn't know much about it and now that I read that my creation..SCHIMMEIG CREG....was involved somehow in the pedigree, I had to make a comment or two.

I thought that one of my striped tomatoes was involved but I doubt if a pink tomato was the other parent, one just doesn't get brown/black/chocolate from that source. Crossing a Schimmeig Creg with another brown/black or a green flesh tomato would come up with that coloring that Chocolate Stripes has. The other fact about the striping is that I feel that most of the improved striping of tomatoes came from a single collection I made in Ames, Iowa in the 1960's. The striping of that collection was not good by today's standards and it was improved through the many crosses and recombinations that I made to fix the trait. This improved striping exists in the early varieties I created...Green Zebra, Schimmeig Stoo, Elberta Girl, etc.



thanks to Heike and Reinhard 2006 Gartentagbuch


Schimmeig Creg was bred for the beauty and firmness and was designed to be a canning tomato on the family farm near Lancaster, Kansas. The flavor was from a selection from the USDA, or make that the seemingly lack of flavor. It was still good enough for what our family needing in canning whole tomatoes, juicing and ketchup. I also was after a type of mechanical harvest friendly tomato....jointless pedicels, thick walls, few locules.....etc.


A cross I would like to make soon is one between Chocolate Stripes and Chocolate Blues..which is unrelated but a chocolate colored stripe with blue shoulders.


Tom Wagner
Tom, you don't know the listed SSE members, I don't know all of them either, but I do know Al Anderson, by reputation, and without going into it his reputation is not sterling and I would have some doubt as to what he says, or says someone else has said to him.

I already pointed out above about the pink possible parent, as did Travis I think, no way to get what's being called Chocolate Stripes, dark colored. Maybe your S Creg, I can never spell it, was involved but there have been lots and lots of striped ones around that post dated S. Creg.

I went to Amishland to see what Lisa had posted since I knew that early on many had bought seeds from her for Chocolate Stripes.

I don't know why I did that b'c her site is filled with so many problems as to facts about tomato histories, where she got the seeds from and so much more. And I should know b'c for the past couple of years she's been listing Amish Potato Leaf and Todd County Amish and there are only two people who know the background on that one and that's Doug in MN who got both varieties, sent the seeds to me and we both decided on names for them. So when she says no clear history, etc., she wouldn't have a clue.

But it's typical of her to kind of be inventive. And she's listed many other varieteis that I introduced and when freadining what she says, I just wince.

Sorry for the mini rant but when she initially called Green Grape Eenie Weenie Greenie and Cherokee Purple as Native American,, well, I don't go to the website unless asked to b'c it just upsets me.

Carolyn, rant over.
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Old May 25, 2013   #25
zeroma
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So, not I have another Chocolate Stripes questions as to history. I recently purchased 12 tomato seedlings from one of the persons mentioned in one of the above posts, seeds having come from Al Anderson. One of the plants is Golden Stripes, which is supposed to be "the original" Chocolate Stripes.

What is the history of Golden Stripes? anyone know? I bought my Chocolate Stripes seeds directly from Al Anderson, drove up north from where I live and picked them up! He told me he has a grower/farmer and an outlet for selling the seedlings. I've now met that person. His tomato info was interesting, but if reputations are 'foggy' as to the background on some of the tomatoes, I would love to hear what anyone here knows of these 2 tomatoes, which one came first and anything else on the actual history.

And flavor/growth/disease & health issues of Golden Stripes too. I love learning all about my 'little tomato babies'. Can't wait to start eating 'em!
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Old May 25, 2013   #26
carolyn137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zeroma View Post
So, not I have another Chocolate Stripes questions as to history. I recently purchased 12 tomato seedlings from one of the persons mentioned in one of the above posts, seeds having come from Al Anderson. One of the plants is Golden Stripes, which is supposed to be "the original" Chocolate Stripes.

What is the history of Golden Stripes? anyone know? I bought my Chocolate Stripes seeds directly from Al Anderson, drove up north from where I live and picked them up! He told me he has a grower/farmer and an outlet for selling the seedlings. I've now met that person. His tomato info was interesting, but if reputations are 'foggy' as to the background on some of the tomatoes, I would love to hear what anyone here knows of these 2 tomatoes, which one came first and anything else on the actual history.

And flavor/growth/disease & health issues of Golden Stripes too. I love learning all about my 'little tomato babies'. Can't wait to start eating 'em!
Anderson lists Gold ( not Golden) Stripes in the SSE Yearbook, I'll just have to type it out since I don't think Tania or others would have any other info, but didn't check to confirm that.

&&&&&Gold Stripes, 85 days,indet, RL, darker color version of Chocolate Stripes,4-6 oz, dark colors and stripes,very good flavor, from OH SI J 02 ( which means he got the seeds in 2002 from Siegle and is only now listing it.

Anderson gets lots of varieties from Siegle who lists none by himself and is not an SSE listed member .

So I assume that you got your plants from Siegle since his farm is not that far away.

And since you know both Anderson and Siegle there is no way I'm going to make any specific comments about Anderson and reputation as known by quite a few SSE members.

Carolyn
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Old January 23, 2014   #27
AKmark
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Grew great for me in a greenhouse in a 10 gallon container, taste was super yummy.

Last edited by AKmark; January 23, 2014 at 07:30 PM.
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Old August 26, 2014   #28
AKmark
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Has anyone else had this variety lose its stripes?
I have grown it for two seasons and got one without its stripes this year, it was good too, and also seems to be pretty darn crack resistant.

As for the regular Stripes, I was slightly disappointed with the first couple tomatoes off the vine this season, but it sure did turn around, super yummy again, everyone loves these tomatoes that eats one,and it is a hit at the farmers markets.
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