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Old January 10, 2010   #46
desertlzbn
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I bought a roll of 7 ft high wire, 100 ft long. I have made some GREAT cages, but now I may have to cut some (3) of them down to be able to cover with tarps because of the colder weather coming later in the week.
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Old January 13, 2010   #47
Paul R
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This has worked good for me, I used field fence. The video is a little long.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIfrkZAS7TA
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Old April 7, 2010   #48
desertlzbn
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I have found a use for all of my old irrigation tubing. I cut it so that I can slip it onto the top of my cages, that way I can put the shade cloth up and not have the cages ripping up the shade cloth. I also am using it to put on the top edge of the hardware mesh that I have around my gardens. That stuff just rips up clothes. I will post a picture soon.
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Old April 7, 2010   #49
ovenbird
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desertlzbn View Post
I have found a use for all of my old irrigation tubing. I cut it so that I can slip it onto the top of my cages, that way I can put the shade cloth up and not have the cages ripping up the shade cloth. I also am using it to put on the top edge of the hardware mesh that I have around my gardens. That stuff just rips up clothes. I will post a picture soon.
Very good idea.
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Old June 15, 2010   #50
recruiterg
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Thawley, thanks for this post.

I bought a roll of CRW and made some cages last weekend. It wasn't too difficult and the cages are very sturdy and will last for years. I made 10 with 13 squares (23" diameter) and a bunch with 11 squares (19" diameter).
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Old June 15, 2010   #51
Thawley
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.

My pleasure.


.
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Old April 1, 2012   #52
Tracydr
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Question about cutting CRW. I was going to buy bolt cutters but realized that I didn't have the hand/arm strength for more than a couple of cuts when I looked at them at Home Depot.
I bought a 50 foot roll of 5 foot CRW for my tomatoes. I'm going to trellises instead of cages. The stuff wasn't cheap at $98 a roll! I thought about getting the cheaper garden fencing at half the price but it has much smaller holes and is much lighter weight. Would be fine for the trellis idea, I suppose, but if I decide to convert to cages next year I wouldn't be able to use it.
I'm hoping I'll eventually convert this to cages, however, if I move next year, it makes more sense not to make a bunch of cages. I could probably sell the cages on Craig's list, I suppose but it would be one more thing to worry about before moving.
Anyway, has anybody ever cut this stuff with a cutting/grinding disc? Or, any other ideas? My hands just aren't that strong and hubby isn't available to help right now. It will I can do to get 9 t-posts pounded. Hoping irrigation today will help.
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Old April 1, 2012   #53
Doug9345
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It sounds like your bolt cutters are too small to do the job easily. If you use ones with 3 or 4 foot handles you should be easy to cut the wire. If I had the money I'd build some. I personally would use a cutting torch, but that is something I already own.
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Old April 1, 2012   #54
Thawley
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Tracy – I agree with Doug about the long handled bolt cutters. But they are heavy enough that handling them easily could become the bigger issue for someone with arthritis or low forearm strength.

I did actually use a 3" air-powered cut off wheel at first. It went thought the mesh like butter. But the noise, sparks and running of the air compressor seemed like overkill for the job, and thats when I switched to wire cutters. I'm a pretty big guy and the wire cutters did require a good bit of force. I'd think about any air or power cut off disk would do the job. A Dremel would be easiest to use, though you'll go thru those tiny abrasive disks pretty quickly. The 4.5" grinders from Harbor Freight are very affordable but harder to wield and outragiously loud. Wear ear protection.

Another thought – if you've got a circular saw or Sawzall already, you can buy abrasive blades for either that would make short work of that mesh.

Hope that helps.
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Old April 1, 2012   #55
Tracydr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug9345 View Post
It sounds like your bolt cutters are too small to do the job easily. If you use ones with 3 or 4 foot handles you should be easy to cut the wire. If I had the money I'd build some. I personally would use a cutting torch, but that is something I already own.
I just tried on a couple pairs at HD. They were really hard to squeeze without anything in them. I didn't buy any.
One had 2 foot handles, one had shorter handles. I wish I had a cutting torch. Maybe I should talk to my husband about getting one as he's had a need for one many times. He welds a little.
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Old April 1, 2012   #56
Tracydr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thawley View Post
Tracy – I agree with Doug about the long handled bolt cutters. But they are heavy enough that handling them easily could become the bigger issue for someone with arthritis or low forearm strength.

I did actually use a 3" air-powered cut off wheel at first. It went thought the mesh like butter. But the noise, sparks and running of the air compressor seemed like overkill for the job, and thats when I switched to wire cutters. I'm a pretty big guy and the wire cutters did require a good bit of force. I'd think about any air or power cut off disk would do the job. A Dremel would be easiest to use, though you'll go thru those tiny abrasive disks pretty quickly. The 4.5" grinders from Harbor Freight are very affordable but harder to wield and outragiously loud. Wear ear protection.

Another thought – if you've got a circular saw or Sawzall already, you can buy abrasive blades for either that would make short work of that mesh.

Hope that helps.
I have the big grinder with the 4.5 inch blades, I think. I do have ear and eye protection.
Can you tell I don't use a lot of tools?
I'm pretty good with a drill and staple gun, lol! And, my weed whacker. Oh, I'm 5.1", 135 lbs and have neck issues.
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Old May 15, 2012   #57
Byron
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Divide the length by 3.142 for the diameter. That 6' length would give you about a 2 ft. diameter. I have found that too large a cage allows the plant to fall over inside.
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Old May 15, 2012   #58
Byron
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I have used concrete wire for several years. I like the large squares that you canget your hand through and get a nice big tomato out. I like to cut the bottom horizontal wire off and I can just step on the wire above and press the vertical wires into the ground to keep the cages upright.
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Old May 15, 2012   #59
Tracydr
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Found that the grinder cut thought the CRW like butter. I made mine into trellis. More multi-purpose this way. Plus, can be stored flat, if I ever decide to store them. Or, when we move, I can take them with us. Made them into 8 foot panels, for ease of use.
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Old May 15, 2012   #60
Byron
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I have enough space I just set mine aside in the winter and I don't plan to move.
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