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Old May 30, 2015   #46
Tracydr
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Originally Posted by RayR View Post
The Sustainable Agricultural Endo Mycorrhizae is the same MycoApply product as VivaRoots!
I have this stuff. Is there a way to add it to my already planted blueberries? Or, would that not be helpful?
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Old May 30, 2015   #47
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Ericoid mycorrhiza is the mycorrhizal fungi inoculate that Blueberries as well as Azalea, Camellia, Cranberry, Heather, and Rhododendron, form a symbiotic relationship with.

Endo and Ecto do very little, if anything at all, for blueberry plants. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ericoid_mycorrhiza

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Last edited by Dutch; May 30, 2015 at 08:35 AM. Reason: Added link
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Old May 30, 2015   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
Ericoid mycorrhiza is the mycorrhizal fungi inoculate that Blueberries as well as Azalea, Camellia, Cranberry, Heather, and Rhododendron, form a symbiotic relationship with.

Endo and Ecto do very little, if anything at all, for blueberry plants. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ericoid_mycorrhiza

Dutch
Interesting .. I have been using the micogrow on every plant I'm growing. So its possible that its not helping at all for some of those? Well, as long as it is not hurting, it doesn't matter I suppose
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Old May 30, 2015   #49
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Interesting .. I have been using the micogrow on every plant I'm growing. So its possible that its not helping at all for some of those? Well, as long as it is not hurting, it doesn't matter I suppose
Endo has an exchange mechanism on the inside of the root (and the hyphae extend outside the root). Endo mycorrhizae form mostly with green leafy plants and most commercially produced plants. Examples: Most Vegetables, Grasses, Flowers, Shrubs, Fruit Trees and Ornamentals.

Ecto lives only outside of the root. Ecto mycorrhizae form mainly with Conifers and Oaks. They are required only for a small percentage of woody type plants/trees.
http://mycorrhizae.com/faqs/differen...o-mycorrhizae/

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The intuitive mind is a gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. But we have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift. (paraphrased) Albert Einstein

I come from a long line of sod busters, spanning back several centuries.

Last edited by Dutch; May 30, 2015 at 01:36 PM. Reason: Grammer
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Old May 30, 2015   #50
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Really impressive results of your trial, Dutch. It's nice to see a difference that's so clear to the naked eye!
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Old June 3, 2015   #51
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Thank you Bower!
I appreciate everything you post here at Tomatoville.
Thanks again.
Dutch
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Old June 15, 2015   #52
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This is an excellent article written by Fred T. Davies, Jr. of Texas A&M University about the benefits of Mycorrhizal Fungi.
http://www.biogreenorganic.com/all-a...y-fred-davies/

The sentences that I have highlighted from the above link are the main reasons I inoculate my tomatoes and pepper plants with Endomycorrhiza.


“Endomycorrhiza are characterized by arbuscules (arbuscular mycorrhiza), and some endomycorrhiza will form both arbuscules and vesicles
these are referred to as vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (Fig. 1). Mycorrhizal hyphae penetrate into the host root cortical cells and extend outward into the surrounding soil, thus increasing the roots surface area. Vesicles are used for food storage, and arbuscules are involved in exchange of elements (phosphorus, magnesium, iron, etc.) which the mycorrhiza gives to the host plant. With this symbiotic association, the mycorrhiza help the host plant more efficiently absorb soil elements and soil water, while the host plant gives the fungi carbon (carbohydrates), since mycorrhiza cannot photosynthesize. Arbuscular mycorrhiza produce a hydrophobic protein called glomalin, which prevents the hyphae from desiccating, and ultimately encourages soil aggregation around the root system that improves the root contact with water and mineral elements in the rhizosphere (Fig 2). This increases the plants resistance to drought and other stresses.”

“INFORMATION ON MYCORRHIZA
The following web sites offer excellent information on mycorrhiza: 1) Mycorrhizal Information Exchange – Bob Augé, University of Tennessee; 2) International Mycorrhiza Society; 3) Joe Morton, INVAM— International Culture Collection of Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi; and 4) Fred Davies, Nursery Crop Physiology Lab, Texas A&M University

Dutch

Last edited by Dutch; June 15, 2015 at 11:18 AM. Reason: Fixed a link
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Old June 15, 2015   #53
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Thanks very much for posting that information, Dutch. I'm trying hard to
absorb this type of info into my very senior brain! Darlene
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Old June 15, 2015   #54
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Pictures and illustrations are very helpful in grasping the words.

http://mycorrhizas.info/vam.html#intro
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Old June 15, 2015   #55
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Thanks Dutch! Those are great resources!
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Old June 15, 2015   #56
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Yes, thanks for all the great information, Dutch. And thanks for the extra plants earlier this season. I am growing one of the Brandy Boy's and its looking good. I think the dip you use has helped it so far this yr. Thanks again!
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Old June 15, 2015   #57
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Thanks, Ray. That's a wonderful site-extremely helpful!
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Old June 21, 2015   #58
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Any thoughts or feelings on T and J BioVam?
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Old February 12, 2016   #59
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Great thread!! Would myco grow for vegetables yield comparable results to kelp4less' or the hydro source’s endo mycorrhizae?
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Old February 12, 2016   #60
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Originally Posted by NoahYates View Post
Great thread!! Would myco grow for vegetables yield comparable results to kelp4less' or the hydro source’s endo mycorrhizae?
Hi Noah,
Yes, MycoGrow should work great. MycoGrow is a product sold by Fungi Perfecti which was founded by Paul Stamets. Paul Stamets is a Mycologist with some pretty impressive credentials. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Stamets
Thank you for your question and if you try it, please post back here with your results.

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The intuitive mind is a gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. But we have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift. (paraphrased) Albert Einstein

I come from a long line of sod busters, spanning back several centuries.
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