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Old April 18, 2017   #1
ARgardener
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Default Activating/ Charging Biochar

Alright, so I've got 2 metal trashcans full of charcoal collected from burn rings.
I read that it needs to be "charged" before being added to the soil, and I'm wondering if any of you have a procedure or recommendation to do this?

I see lots of videos of people using gobs of expensive ingredients (loads of guano, liquid kelp, micronized rock dust, etc.), but I'm looking for cost-effective, simple, and (relatively) quick way to make my charcoal effective.

Anyone have any ideas? Compost teas? Manures? Fish emulsion? etc?
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Old April 18, 2017   #2
IdahoTee
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What about mixing the Biochar into active compost and letting it self charge?
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Old April 18, 2017   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IdahoTee View Post
What about mixing the Biochar into active compost and letting it self charge?
I read this takes a few months
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Old April 26, 2017   #4
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Another option would be to create something like the Terra Char product.

They charge it with SCD Bio and I think Sea-90. Not sure how much Biochar you are activating, but a quart of bio ag isn't too expensive.

Here is a link to a power point somewhat detailing their methods.

http://www.dyarrow.org/CarbonSmartFarming/CSF9-SARE.pps
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Old April 26, 2017   #5
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I dont think anyone knows exactly how those folks did it way back when or why.
Was it by accident or for a reason?
They probably noticed the plants were greener in the char piles at first.
Then there is the fact it was done in very poor soil not good soil.
It is only now that people are realizing just how advanced these folks were and how wide spread they were.
All it took was a little interaction with some sick Spaniards and it wiped out the whole bunch leaving a few to run off and spread the sickness to everyone else.
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Old May 3, 2017   #6
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Well I gave up on rushing things. I'll activate it throughout the summer then add it to the beds once the season ends.
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