Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Have a favorite recipe that's always a hit with family and friends? Share it with us!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8686
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 813
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
One of my all time favorite dressings is tahini with lemon juice, soy sauce and garlic. Simple but so rich and delicious. I don't know what it is about the old country foods but they really resonate with me.
Bower, what you described (tahini+garlic+lemon juice, without the soy sauce) is a very famous and popular Lebanese dressing we call "taratour." We use it on MANY Things:
1) Shawarma
2) falafel
3) char-broiled fish
4) the base for hummus (chick peas) and baba-gannooj (char-broiled eggplant)
5) appetizer dip dressing with boiled lima beans, swiss chard stems...
6) plain
...

I usually make a large batch and keep some in the fridge. It's really addictive.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8687
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,299
Default

Taratour - thanks Taboule! I've been eating it for nearly forty years and didn't know it had a name.

Every middle eastern food I've ever eaten has been delicious. Falafel is another one which I really love. I don't have a good recipe though! Please share.
I recall I bought a box of "falafel mix" at some point and although I followed the directions it didn't come out as it should at all. Surely I could do better from scratch?
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8688
upcountrygirl
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: south carolina
Posts: 412
Default

Taboule...would you mind sharing those omelet recipes?

I love falafel!

Memorial Day sales started here today in our local grocery stores. I looked at the sales flyers. Lots of good deals. Time to stock up again at the grocery stores I think.

Gigi is making homemade chicken alfredo for supper. I just ate lunch and my belly is rumbling just thinking about it! lol...
upcountrygirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8689
PlainJane
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: North Florida
Posts: 927
Default

What to do with a bunch of odds ‘n ends veggies and chicken?

Kitchen Sink Pasta with biquinho and bell peppers, mushrooms, asparagus and a big Queen of the Sea ripe tomato.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg EC725617-FFF1-41E9-B920-4967EC3EE383.jpg (438.3 KB, 64 views)
PlainJane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8690
MrsJustice
Tomatovillian™
 
MrsJustice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hampton, Virginia
Posts: 486
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Here is a nutritious and low cost meal.
Black eyed peas home grown chard two mean yellow onions some chunks of homemade ham and water.
Worth
Attachment 56322
I have to try your Recipe Worth.
__________________
May God Bless you and my Garden, Amen

MrsJustice
MrsJustice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8691
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 813
Default

Bower, WRT falafel recipe, I'll describe it here in 2 parts.

First, the main component, the fried patties, starting with a disclaimer. I haven't made them from my own dry mix in a long time. There are some decent mixes out there, best are sold in bulk in middle-eastern and/or health-food store. It was fairly available when I lived is So Cal. But it's not difficult to make your own, and MUCH cheaper as you'd guess. This is the place to experiment.

Main ingredient is chick peas alone, or mixed with fava beans, ground. I understand that one can find chickpea flour, but I've never bought it. You need a heavy duty grinder if you want to make the flour yourself, they are tough as rocks. If you're going to use a food processor, best to soak them overnight to tenderize them a bit, with a teaspoon of baking soda, drain, then pulverize them (coarse) with the spice mix. But then this mix will be wet and would store in the fridge for a few days only.

For making a big batch of DRY mix:

4 cups of peas or peas/fava beans mix flour (either buy it or grind it, coarse)
1 TB each of cumin, coriander, garlic powder, flower
2TB of dried parsley flakes
1 teaspoon each of salt and baking soda
optionally other spices or herbs to taste (not traditional but to each their own)

To make the patties, mix about 1 cup of dry mix with ~1/3 cup of cold water, let rest at least a few hours, or overnight (best, so the chunky grains of peas soften a bit) Wet mix should be soft but not too wet, and should not stick to your hands. shape a 2 inch ball then flatten it a bit, to about 2.5 in diameter, like a puck, so the center cooks better. Or use the special tool for this, found in ME stores. Then deep fry.

This is probably the hardest part of the recipe, the proper mix wetness. Too wet, and it breaks up during frying (because the water within it bubbles up and tries to get out). Too dry and they come out tough -instead of fluffy.

Part 2 is much easier and more fun, and as I said earlier, for the first time, try to find and use a good ready mix, and learn the consistency and frying with that, then mix your own.

I'll send this now so i don't lose it, will come back to cover part 2.

Last edited by taboule; 4 Weeks Ago at 02:24 PM.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8692
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,299
Default

Taboule, this is so awesome. I use chick pea flour so usually have some, but the last time I bought it there was no plain available, I ended up buying a mix of chick pea and fava! Works as well in my recipes too. Not sure if there is four cups there though.
Also need to go through my garlic and dry any that are not to keep longer. I don't have any garlic powder but home made is the best!



The falafel mix I bought back when, was useless... it had pretty large slivers of dry beans in it! which did not soften at all in the process, so not really fit to eat. And they did fall apart, just as you said, now that you mention it. I could see mixing some up, and put into a closed container in the fridge overnight, to develop some proper tack.

And I'm going to practice as much as it takes, to learn how to do this!
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8693
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 813
Default

Glad the long winded explanations didn't turn you off .. To me the only way i understand anything, and also remember it is when I see the mechanics/physics, and the reasoning behind it. Proportions of a recipe dont interest me as much as what each ingredient contributes, and how they work together.

One last addition to this (part 1) is I've seen recipes, and enjoyed eating falafel that looked green inside, as it had fresh herbs -parsley or cilantro. Very tasty, although I havent tried making it myself, so you may want to also experiment with that.

Part 2, eating them:

Condiments that make it a rounded meal:

Chopped parsley and radishes
Diced tomatoes
Diced cuke and turnip pickles -the latter is jarred with a few beets that give it the prettiest purple color, found in ME stores
Optionally, pickled hot peppers

Need large pita bread, preferably the thinner type that easily separates into 2 sheets. Break up 3 or 4 hot patties on the Pita, in a single diametrical line, add the condiments, then scoop a generous amount of taratour on the entire works, roll into a tight cylinder (we call it "aarouss") then enjoy. Scoop additional tahini to keep it juicy and dripping down your chin.

This is the traditional way I grew up with, one can vary as they wish. it also doesnt need to be in a roll, tastes the same eaten from a plate. We typically don't use lettuce, think of it as only a filler.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8694
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,299
Default

This is wonderful and just what I needed! The explanations are the best part.
I am missing a couple of ingredients - garlic powder and - I don't think there's any dried parsley either, I just potted up tiny parsley seedlings this afternoon so there'll be a wait but they're on the way.


I really love the taste of the traditional falafel, so I will definitely be making it that way - but for now I'm going to start with a quarter batch and substitute fresh garlic and - not sure what to sub for parsely. I have fresh celery leaf and fresh rosemary... maybe rosemary would be best..


A special friend of ours is in town with her little one I haven't met yet, so my two friends are bringing her and their children tomorrow afternoon for some cooking and eating and fun. So I'll put the test batch in the fridge for the night and we'll add that to the menu.
And now I need a recipe for pita bread....
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8695
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,299
Default Pita bread

Here's a simple recipe and a great video... I can do this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPiA69p4gqE
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8696
taboule
Tomatovillian™
 
taboule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MA
Posts: 813
Default

Instead of parsley, try cilantro instead -if you have it. It is after all another form of (Chinese) parsley. 2nd best would be celery IMO.

Now to the other omelet recipes for UPCountryGirl.

I'm not sure how much detail you'd like: most omelets are made up of 1) the egg mixture, 2) filling, and 3) topping (optional)

1)The egg mixture is best made with milk or cream, and whipped well to incorporate air,which gives it the light, airy, fluffy texture (and volume).

2) I think you're probably asking about the filling itself: chili, or the creamy shrimp sauce.

Probably no need to get into a chili recipe in here, there are tons of them out there.

The shrimp filling, start with a cream sauce (I meant bechamel in thread above, NOT newburg, which has a tomato sauce/paste in it. Can't keep tomatoes off my mind. Now corrected)Sauce is a mix of flower, butter, and cream, gently cooked to medium consistency. You can make it richer by adding cheese (which turns it into Alfredo if you add parmesan for example). When done, add small(or tiny) cleaned, uncooked shrimp. It will cook in no time to a thick stew.

Assemble omelet by cooking egg mix in hot oiled pan, spread filling in a line per diameter, fold both ends over filling, top with more cheese -medium/mild flavor is best.

Not exactly for folks with high cholesterol, but heavenly taste and sticks to your ribs.

BTW, although these recipes may seem elaborate, they're still inexpensive dishes. Most expensive ingredient is the shrimp, but amount used is so small.
taboule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8697
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: 25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.
Posts: 37,120
Default

We interrupt our regular scheduled programming to introduce you to one of our new sponsors.
Worth's Killer Peanut Brittle.
Ingredients.
Sugar Steens cane syrup salt vanilla butter baking soda peanuts.
Wholesome goodness form our kitchen to your home.

IMG_20190523_41997.jpg

IMG_20190523_32481.jpg
__________________
Did Someone Mention Food????

Worth

Last edited by Worth1; 4 Weeks Ago at 05:55 PM.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8698
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 751
Default

LOL! Does it stick to your teeth?

An old friend gave me a recipe years ago that foams up pretty good right before you pour it out of the pot and it makes a brittle that's pretty airy and light. No sticking. It's the same ingredients as yours except Karo syrup instead of Steens and no butter.

That reminds me of when I was stationed in Germany. Our co-ed barracks had a kitchen and one weekend one of the ladies made brittle. I guess she forgot to grease the cookie sheet she turned it out on and it hardened so bad none of it ever came off. Of course, those of us hanging out that afternoon had had a few brews so there were plenty of comments and we all laughed until we couldn't breathe! One of the guys hung the thing on the wall. It was still there when I left a year later.

Thanks for the memory!
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8699
upcountrygirl
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: south carolina
Posts: 412
Default

Thanks, taboule!

PlainJane..that looks good and you introduced me to a new to me tomato variety as well. I've come to the realization i'll never be able to try all the varieties t'villers alone have introduced me to but it's fun to learn about them...I think i'll put queen of the sea on my wish to grow list...was the tomato good? Did you save the seeds?

Worth, the peanut brittle looks good as always!

We spent a looonnnggg time today repackaging and prepping food after we got back from the grocery stores with their memorial day sales....
upcountrygirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8700
PlainJane
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: North Florida
Posts: 927
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by upcountrygirl View Post
Thanks, taboule!

PlainJane..that looks good and you introduced me to a new to me tomato variety as well. I've come to the realization i'll never be able to try all the varieties t'villers alone have introduced me to but it's fun to learn about them...I think i'll put queen of the sea on my wish to grow list...was the tomato good? Did you save the seeds?

Worth, the peanut brittle looks good as always!

We spent a looonnnggg time today repackaging and prepping food after we got back from the grocery stores with their memorial day sales....
The taste of Queen of the Sea is good - but I’ve had better pink/red tomatoes. Marianna’s Peace and Anna Russian come to mind. I have not saved seeds as it is a hybrid. I got it as a plant from Laure’s Heirloom Tomatoes...
PlainJane is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:59 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★