Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating all other edible garden plants.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old October 12, 2016   #91
shule1
Tomatovillian™
 
shule1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Southwestern Idaho (zones 4–6)
Posts: 689
Default

@habitat_gardener

Mine didn't get fully mature on the vine (since the season ends not too long after the days get shorter here), but I did get black seeds that seem to be viable from the biggest one. That one was stringy like spaghetti squash, but tasted kind of like tangy rice noodles when baked. It's the only tangy squash I remember having tried. That might be due to the growing or storage conditions, though.

The greens have the best taste of all the squash greens I've tried so far. They taste like a mix between green beans and spinach. They go well in soups and stuff. They don't put spiny fuzz on your tongue like some squash leaves. I'm not particular about how mature the leaves are with these, but I can be with some squash. Most squash greens are supposed to be edible (but if they're bitter, they're probably toxic). C. ficifolia definitely has edible leaves (except the cotyledons; so, I wouldn't make sprouts out of them). The stems and shoots are edible, too, as long as they're not too fibrous. The veins in mature leaves can be fibrous, but the portions between the main veins are still tender.

The young squash tasted kind of like good, tender zucchini mixed with milk and the ocean, and maybe something tropical, but the juice was too sticky for me to want to make a habit of eating it raw, although I did enjoy the taste. The raw juice sticks to my teeth and fingers and doesn't wash off. It's not sticky once it's really stuck to you, though. It's just like it fills in the pores, cracks and stuff on my fingers and makes the surface smooth (it sticks to my finger skin for days).

Last edited by shule1; October 12, 2016 at 11:43 PM.
shule1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 20, 2017   #92
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,047
Default

Does anybody have Yacon? I bought some and accidentally bought the edible tubers instead of propagation tubers. Hoping I can find some here since the propagation ones are $39.00 on Amazon and Etsy. Otherwise,I'll check Baker Creek,I think they have a better price.
I did put the tubers in the ground. Haven't seen any shoots but. Dug up one and it seems to be growing roots.
I also bought Jerusalem Artichokes. I have them in pots,trying to figure out where I want them.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 20, 2017   #93
shule1
Tomatovillian™
 
shule1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Southwestern Idaho (zones 4–6)
Posts: 689
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shule1 View Post
In addition to walking onions, you might try the Green Mountain multiplier onion, potato onions (like the Yellow potato onion), shallots, and maybe some bunching onions (I'm not sure if they multiply like shallots, or if they only last a year or two).
It turns out that bunching onions do multiply (and are often perennial). They are often very cold hardy.
shule1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 20, 2017   #94
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,047
Default

I'm growing potato onions and shallots,along with herbs-mints x 3 kinds,sage,rosemary. I think I lost my lavender but will replant.
This spring I'm starting some artichokes,Jerusalem artichokes,yacon ( if I find some), horseradish and will replant my strawberries to a more suitable spot. I also have tree kale ( red and regular) which I started in the greenhouse from cuttings this winter. They have done well in pots and are ready to go out.
I tried starting sorrel from seed but it hasn't germinated.
Almost forgot asparagus! That hasn't popped up yet this year,should be our first year to harvest,I planted it three springs ago.
I have also sprouted a ginger and ordered some turmeric to start. They may be stuck in the greenhouse during winter but I'll try some both ways.

Last edited by Tracydr; February 20, 2017 at 07:07 PM.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 20, 2017   #95
habitat_gardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: California
Posts: 2,347
Default

I've been growing yacon for about a decade and always have tubers to share ($39 is riduculous! I can send some in a flat-rate box if you pay postage. send me a pm). lately I've been growing them only in containers, because they still produce but don't get as huge. One year I potted up a bunch of small ones in 4-inch pots, and even those produced some tubers!

Perennial kale is my favorite! I used to have a few forests of it before it was demolished by bagrada and harlequin bugs at some community gardens, and by cabbage moth caterpillars and squirrels in the backyard! I still have some plants and am hoping to reestablish a forest.
habitat_gardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:04 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★