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Old May 22, 2016   #1
joseph
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Default Solanum pennellii

LYC 1831, Solanum pennellii. It's growing the least vigorously for me of the wild species. I suppose that I'm way over-watering it.
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Old June 26, 2016   #2
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Flower of LYC 1831, Solanum pennellii. Rather than having an "anther cone" , it has an "anther cylinder". The anthers are not fully joined together. The ends of the cylinder are open so that pollen can easily leave. The stigma is exerted. The flowers are located on an inflorescence high above the foliage. Just the kind of thing that I am looking for to contribute to a promiscuous pollination project.

Last edited by joseph; June 26, 2016 at 10:10 PM.
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Old June 26, 2016   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joseph View Post
LYC 1831, Solanum pennellii. It's growing the least vigorously for me of the wild species. I suppose that I'm way over-watering it.

Give'm some Nitrogen, Joseph .
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Old August 7, 2016   #4
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Solanum pennellii is the little tiny plant on the right edge of the trellis. They don't seem to be doing well under any of the conditions that I have planted them into. S. corneliomullerii is the plant in approximately the center of the photo.

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Old July 24, 2017   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by @imgrimmer
I am really excited to see the fruits.
Okay, lets see if my old Flickr account will work for these photos. I have since abandoned Photobucket since the new external link to photos must be paid for. The photos are still there on photobucket if you click on the link. If it works, i actually think i like the Flickr interface better. Not sure why i didn't switch back earlier.

Here are some photos of unripe F1 Solanum pennellii x domestic tomato fruits.









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Old July 24, 2017   #6
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I cant wait until the F2 generation!

Fruits are expected to look like this when ripe:

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Old November 2, 2017   #7
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Keen101: Thanks for photos of the [Domestic X S. pennellii] cross.

I grew S. pennellii this summer. They didn't thrive for me. But I have some growing in pots that I brought inside for the winter which have some fruits on them. Perhaps there will be seeds. Daily misting of the plants seems to be important to growing them in my climate.

I also brought some F1:[domestic X S. habrochaites] hybrids inside for the winter. I'm using pollen from S. pennellii to attempt to pollinate them.
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Old November 4, 2017   #8
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I guess in a way, it's a good thing they're small if you have to bring em indoors for the winter.
Could pennellii be the tomato to grow in a spruce bog? Sadly I doubt that too.
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Old November 7, 2017   #9
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There are S. pennellii flowers on my indoor tomato plants, and flowers on a [domestic X S. habrochaites] cross, so I am attempting manual crosses between them.
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Old November 10, 2017   #10
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I'm currently growing an F2 Pennellii hybrid indoors for the winter. It has beautiful potato leaves! and it has NO SMELL! does not smell like a wild tomato and does not smell like a regular tomato. In fact the leaves taste like spinach. Imagine that?! A tomato with edible foliage that you can use in a salad as a spinach substitute?!!

Using an OralB electric toothbrush. Think i have one fruit setting. Hoping it too is edible and leans more towards domestic tomatoes size and taste this time. Fingers crossed.

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Old November 10, 2017   #11
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I don't know if you noticed, Joseph, but there are two Armenian tomatoes (Nver and Gandzak) on ScottinAtlanta's list that were developed by hybridization with distantly related species.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=46176

I am curious about these myself, since I have no hope of ever working with wild spp. and can only hope to poach some of their traits from other people's work - as I think is the case with Beta orange tomatoes like Zolotoe Serdtse. Standing on shoulders of giants and all that.
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Old November 10, 2017   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joseph View Post
Flower of LYC 1831, Solanum pennellii. Rather than having an "anther cone" , it has an "anther cylinder". The anthers are not fully joined together. The ends of the cylinder are open so that pollen can easily leave. The stigma is exerted. The flowers are located on an inflorescence high above the foliage. Just the kind of thing that I am looking for to contribute to a promiscuous pollination project.
Oh, i forgot to mention... The F2 has unattached anther cone! They are all free! Just what you are looking for Joseph!
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Old April 23, 2018   #13
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I'm growing Solanum pennellii again this year. This is the third year for me. They have not thrived for me, but last year they produced seeds. They seem to have little delicate root systems, and don't seem to do well in my potting or garden soil. Last year I had some success with keeping them in the greenhouse, and spraying them every day, because it seems like in their natural habitat they are watered by fog.

This spring, I transplanted seedlings into various types of soil, compost, sand, coir, etc. The most successful was a batch of compost made a couple of years ago from mostly squash fruits. The least successful was my standard coconut coir potting soil. Woot! perhaps S. pennellii will do better for me this year. I'm intending to grow them in pots in the greenhouse.

I'm also intending to attempt grafting S pennellii onto Jagodka root stocks. Jagodka grows vigorously and quickly for me and thrives in my garden soil.

Last edited by joseph; April 23, 2018 at 12:31 PM.
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Old April 23, 2018   #14
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I am growing Nver this year, pretty exciting about it, have never heard about it before I was offered seeds in a trade.
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Old April 29, 2018   #15
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Joseph: Perhaps it takes a lot of water to produce a good-tasting tomato, but it seems that too much water lessens the flavor. Just curious about Dan Chitwood, now at MSU, who was mentioned in a National Geographic story in 2014. Have you any thoughts to share on his study toward producing a drought-resistant tomato plant. Perhaps it is smoke and mirrors. Have been unable to see, or print out any of his articles, including the one listed below. Coneva V, Frank MH, de Luis Balaguer MA, Li M, Sozzani R, Chitwood DH. (2017) Genetic architecture and molecular networks underlying leaf thickness in desert-adapted tomato Solanum pennellii. Plant Physiol. [Epub ahead of print]. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.00790. Pre-print: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/111005
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