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Old August 13, 2017   #1
Gardeneer
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Default Fall Cole Crops

8/11/17
Who is growing Cole Crops ? Where ? when ? What ?

Yesterday and today I sowed the following :

-- Broccoli ( in cells )
-- Brussels Sprouts ( in cells )
-- Swiss Chard ( in cells )
-- Spinach (both Direct sown and in cells, from my ow saved seeds of slow bolting)
-- Arugula (Direct sown and in cells )
-- Fenugreek.(Direct sown)
-- Mustard (Direct sown, from my own saved seeds)
-- Lettuce ( red and green, from my own saved seeds of slow bolting varieties )

I am going to water the direct sown but nothing can beat good soaking rain.
Are in it ?
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Old August 13, 2017   #2
agee12
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I planted Brussels Sprouts yesterday, I wanted to get those started because of their long growth cycle.

I am also planning broccoli, spinach, chard, collards, peas, lettuce, mustard, bok choy, radish, beets and maybe carrots.

Last edited by agee12; August 13, 2017 at 08:28 AM.
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Old August 13, 2017   #3
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I have tray after tray of healthy plants ready to be set out, but with the heat and very high humidity, I am waiting. A real feel of 110 yesterday and more coming this week. Constant showers on the afternoons.

A couple days ago my wife did much of the work in setting put some no till rows. I used a large PVC pipe to mark each row and then sprinkled lime; this left well defined spaces when the pipe was removed. Then a Warren hoe was used to dig the shallow holes for the seed.

I still have seed for later planting.

We carefully searched the web for winter hardy varieties of brassicas, lettuce, oriental greens, cabbages and more....those that would last through the winter.

With all of the pests above and below ground, diseases, and nutritional needs of the seed plantings, any suggestions for how to side dress or broadcast soil treatments to make a pre-emptive strike against later pests and address nutrient issues without killing the seedlings.

I have forgotten so much after my stroke and just can't till, dig, or bend much. At least this small effort gets me outside and provides some interest. Right now, the seed is in the ground in one spot and the plants will go into my other garden of pure compost. Suppose, later side dressing with top soil or other treatments would help the back garden of solid clay? Used to be the brassicas and cabbages would get eaten alive top and bottom by disease and pests.
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Old August 13, 2017   #4
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I let kale overwinter and it went to seed, cut it down and thru seed pods in a pile... I have thousands of kale plants sprouted after I moved the pile. Such good germination, I need to plant a few rows of it.
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Old August 16, 2017   #5
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8/16/17
Thanks and hello to all Fall Gardeners !
It gives me a feeling of cool fall weather.

Almost all my seeds have germinated, both direct sown or in cells.
I let those in cells to get bigger and then one of these days when it is cool and nice in the PM hours I will plant them in the garden.

I forgot to mention that I have also planted few hills of potatoes.
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Old August 16, 2017   #6
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I'm in Central Texas and I started broccoli, brocolini, broccoli Rajan, b sprouts, cabbage, snow peas, shell peas, beets, Romanesco, and cauliflower. I started them inside under lights a few weeks ago. Going to hold them inside until probably late September because we're still predicted 100+ for the foreseeable future.

I'm hoping a little shade and a soaker hose should be able to get them through any heat streaks.


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Old August 16, 2017   #7
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I thought about just starting a few potatoes in my compost pile off the side of my house. Just to see what happens. I already discarded a couple tomato plants there and they seem like they may take off with a little luck and some rain.

I'm nervous to set out the broccoli I started about a month ago because we're well over the 100 degree mark and probably will be for a while. I do have some shade over them and can set up my drip to hit them 2x per day for a bit to cool off if necessary.


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Old August 16, 2017   #8
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Yeah, I wouldn't set them out when highs are 92F +++.
They are Cole crops and won't appreciate hot weather.
I might take them out of cells and pot them in small pots. I have lots of them from Dollar Tree store.
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Old August 16, 2017   #9
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I have started Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and rutabagas in cells in the greenhouse. I got spotty to good sprouting because even with a small air conditioner and shade cloth over the top it is still hot inside from 10 to 4. No chance of me starting anything outside for a while. I will start some lettuce, spinach and repeats of the above crops in a week or so. Last year fall never got here until nearly the end of November which was really unusual; but maybe the drought had something to do with it staying so hot and so dry for so long. This year drought is no problem at all so maybe it will cool down some in late September or early October which is more normal. I will wait for cooler nights before planting carrots, mustard and setting out my seedlings. I would rather be a bit late and use hoops than have plants demolished by pests or going to seed very early.

I am going to try growing some Cilantro this fall and winter. I would love to grow it during the summer when I could really use it but it goes to seed before it gets started; but we hope to can a bit of salsa and just add the Cilantro when we open it. It tastes much better that way.

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Old August 17, 2017   #10
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I'm not doing too well on my tomatoes I started. I need my light setup in here but I have no place to put it. That's why I wanted to try just using nature and planting everything from seed later.
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Old August 17, 2017   #11
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Some on the list aren't Cole crops.
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Old August 17, 2017   #12
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More fall under the blanket of "Fall Garden"

Gardeneer - that's what I was planning on doing, does anyone know the maximum temp recommended to set out Cole crops?
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Old August 18, 2017   #13
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This is what i grow in Fall-Winter-Spring with a few comments:

Lettuce - Lettuce is grown in round containers made from tops of plastic barrels (not 55 gallon, but the next size down). This way can bring inside when it gets cold and have Lettuce all winter. Favorite is Green Ice

Arugula (think it is Dragon Tongue Arugula) Grown in the same round container

Chinese Bok Choi - grown in ground, excellent in salads

Bloomsdale Spinach - new to me this year

Siberian Kale - Plant more of this than anything else, use to plant more Georgia Collard but everyone said they liked Siberian Kale better. Will survive the whole winter and produce again in the spring. Last year was mild so it grew almost all winter. Tastes great raw in salads and such

Georgia Collard - I love collards and they are very cold hardy and will survive winter and produce in the spring. If it doesn't get real cold will grow all winter. I have picked collards when the leaves were frozen solid.

Arcadia Broccoli - New Broccoli to me. Use to buy Packman but they stopped making it. Did a lot of research and Arcadia seemed like a suitable replacement

Purple Top Turnips - Will survive all winter if they reach a good size before it gets cold. The turnip itself can actually freeze solid a 2 or 3 times and recover and be fine. I was skeptical but when I read it but have experienced it so i know it is true. It helps to mulch but when it gets really cold they will freeze.

Many different cover crops that include Chickweed, Henbit, Hairy Vetch, Clover, and a few I haven't identified yet. All these grow right along with the main crops and do not hurt them at all.

I think that is all
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Old August 18, 2017   #14
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Seagle I planted bloomsdale spinach late last August and didn't harvest much but I covered it with straw when it got really cold and uncovered it in the early spring. They leaves looked kind of crummy but they soon perked up and I had the earliest spinach salads ever.
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Old August 18, 2017   #15
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Thank you brownrexx, good to know that it will survive the winter. I have never actually ever seen Bloomsdale but I remember Camochef said it was his favorite and I think he grows a lot of spinach. I also like the fact that its all ruffled looking, looks crunchy
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