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Old February 27, 2018   #76
Salsacharley
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I got Numex Trick or Treat bonus seeds from the New Mexico Chile Pepper Institute last year and they are amazing. You can't tell them from a regular habanero and they have the exact flavor and texture of habs, but NO HEAT. They are like habanero flavored bell peppers. I just use them for tricks. You can impress people by munching on them at will with no effects. I suppose Habanada is very similar.





This is my first year growing Habanada. I hope it lives up to the hype. If so, it will be the base for several gallons of lacto-fermented hot sauce.
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Old March 1, 2018   #77
tarpalsfan
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Help me. I have a pepper plant addiction. I say that I am just going to grow only Habanada and Yellow Monster,perhaps an ancho and buy a jalapeno...but the ghost of great peppers from seasons past is haunting me about now...in about 2 months I see about 40 too many pepper plants begging to be planted. Tomatoes too! and gourds...and squash...and...
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Old March 1, 2018   #78
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Help me. I have a pepper plant addiction. I say that I am just going to grow only Habanada and Yellow Monster,perhaps an ancho and buy a jalapeno...but the ghost of great peppers from seasons past is haunting me about now...in about 2 months I see about 40 too many pepper plants begging to be planted. Tomatoes too! and gourds...and squash...and...
You need to find a support group for people dealing with serious vegetable addiction. I am working on my own..I have gone from 120 plants to a measly 36 over the years.

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Old March 1, 2018   #79
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I won some seeds off a internet contest so I'll be growing Shi★★★★o peppers along with my usual North Star bell peppers both are sweet peppers.

Last edited by Jetstar; March 1, 2018 at 06:49 PM.
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Old March 1, 2018   #80
FarmerShawn
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Originally Posted by Father'sDaughter View Post
For hot sauce, this is my go to recipe. I usually only use one type of pepper for each batch since I like to have the flavor of the individual peppers. I've made it with everything from Jalapeños to Aji Limons, and even with lightly smoked peppers --

Master Hot Sauce Recipe

3/4 pound stemmed fresh chiles (such as jalapeño, serrano, Fresno, or habanero; use one variety or mix and match)
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 1/8 cups distilled white vinegar

Variations:
3/4 -1 1/2 minced garlic cloves
Pinch of cumin

Pulse chiles and kosher salt in a food processor until a coarse purée forms. Transfer to a 1-qt. glass jar, loosely screw on lid, and let stand at room temperature for 12 hours to ferment slightly (I let it go for longer, 1-2 days).

Stir in vinegar and loosely screw on lid. Let chile mixture stand at room temperature for at least 1 day and up to 7 days. (Taste it daily; the longer it sits, the deeper the flavor becomes.)

Purée mixture (with garlic and cumin, if using) in a food processor or blender until smooth, about 1 minute. Place a fine-mesh sieve inside a funnel. Strain mixture through sieve into a clean glass bottle. (Hot sauce will become thinner and may separate after you strain it; shake vigorously before each use.)
This is basically the same recipe I use, although I find I get intriguing flavor if I mix 6-10 varieties for each batch, even including a Ghost pepper or two, and some Habaneros, etc. And, I add the garlic in the original food processing step.
But the one thing i do, if you have the equipment, is, after I strain the solids just as you describe, I dehydrate those solids. When dry, I grind them into a powder, which has the same flavor as the sauce it comes from. Great for when you run out of sauce, or to sprinkle on popcorn.
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Old March 1, 2018   #81
rhines81
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Originally Posted by FarmerShawn View Post
But the one thing i do, if you have the equipment, is, after I strain the solids just as you describe, I dehydrate those solids. When dry, I grind them into a powder, which has the same flavor as the sauce it comes from. Great for when you run out of sauce, or to sprinkle on popcorn.
Great idea!
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Old March 1, 2018   #82
2mnyrzs
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Here's my list, I love peppers!

Targu Mures
Satan's Kiss
Padron
Red Ember
Puya
Jalapeno Billy Biker
Jalapeño Traveler's strain
Act Sivri
Maria Nagy's Transylvanian
Piazinho
Hot Portugal
Ram's Horn
Fresno
Chervena Velikan Kamba
Mama Mia Giallo
Cserko
Ljubov Dlan
Joe E. Parker
Stocky Red Roaster
Stocky Golden Roaster
Jolene's Sweet
Shi★★★★o
Marconi Purple
Golden Treasure
Sweetest Pepper
Ajvarski
Florina
Liebesapfel
Manganji
Red Bulgarian
Anaheim College 64
Ausilio
Georgia Flame
Hajduczek
Purple Beauty
Early Sensation
Chinese Giant
Melrose
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Old March 2, 2018   #83
Shelley
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Rough time getting sweet peppers to germinate this year. Only ~ 40% germination rates , but I have plenty!

Avarski
Beaver Dam
Black Hungarian
Buran
Chervena Chujski
Conquistador
Cristal
Feher Ozon
Georgia Flame
Giant Anaconda
Italia
Karmen (OP)
Ljubov Dlan
Mangaji
Piment D' Espelette
Piment De Bresse
Red Bountiful (bell)
Red Marconi
Ros De Mallorca
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Old March 2, 2018   #84
HudsonValley
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Rough time getting sweet peppers to germinate this year. Only ~ 40% germination rates , but I have plenty!
I read recently (somewhere on these boards, I think) that pepper seeds only have to have a 55% germination rate to be sold, so your germination rate isn't bad! This year I'm putting down three times more seeds than pepper plants I can use, as "insurance."
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Old March 2, 2018   #85
rhines81
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I read recently (somewhere on these boards, I think) that pepper seeds only have to have a 55% germination rate to be sold, so your germination rate isn't bad! This year I'm putting down three times more seeds than pepper plants I can use, as "insurance."
Seed laws are covered individually by each State. If I recall, many States do not have a minimum requirement for seeds offered for sale, but they DO require seeds to undergo regular germination testing and have proper/current labeling of the germination rate.
I guess they figure if consumers are stupid enough to buy seeds labelled with a 10% germination rate ... at least they were warned.
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Old March 2, 2018   #86
Patihum
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Peppers with a * have been overwintered in the greenhouse and we've enjoyed having fresh peppers this winter. Plus 4 crosses

Boldog
Bill's Striped
Canoncito - landrace
Cayenne Yellow
Chocolate Ancho
Giant Sweet Devil's Horn
Jalapeno Gigantia
Jalmundo
Kolobok*
Little Bells
Oxhorn of Carmagnola
Peperone di Senise*
Poblano L
Santa Lucia Island*
Spanish Piquillo
Stavros
Stocky Red Roaster
Stocky Golden Roaster
Sirenevyi
Thunder Mountain Longhorn*
Tollie's Traveler Jalapeno
Yummy Orange*

Except for the Viper these are already up and growing

Peach Scorpion Jolokia
Naga Viper
Chocolate Scorpion
7 Pod Infinity
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Old March 2, 2018   #87
rhines81
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Stavros
I've been wanting to try this variety, but every year I totally forget about it (until I see it on someone's list). Maybe next year.
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Old March 3, 2018   #88
Shelley
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Originally Posted by HudsonValley View Post
I read recently (somewhere on these boards, I think) that pepper seeds only have to have a 55% germination rate to be sold, so your germination rate isn't bad! This year I'm putting down three times more seeds than pepper plants I can use, as "insurance."
I pre soaked my seeds overnight in a potassium nitrate solution before sowing them and used two thermometers inside the covered tray and placed them on the heat mat but to no avail for many varieties. I then used the soaked paper towel/baggie method on a heat mat and got two stubborn varieties to finally pop today. Next year, I plan to germinate seeds using the latter method before planting. And I will plant double the seeds for sure.
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Old March 4, 2018   #89
HudsonValley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelley View Post
I pre soaked my seeds overnight in a potassium nitrate solution before sowing them and used two thermometers inside the covered tray and placed them on the heat mat but to no avail for many varieties. I then used the soaked paper towel/baggie method on a heat mat and got two stubborn varieties to finally pop today. Next year, I plan to germinate seeds using the latter method before planting. And I will plant double the seeds for sure.
I may try the baggie method for the second batch... I did a two-day soak in warm water over a heat mat, then sowed in coconut coir. It's now a week later, and I have 15 shish!tos and 5 habaneros up. I already have more than I need of those. My two paprika varieties are just appearing, as is a Turkish fish pepper, but there's no sign of Golden Nugget. In another week or two I'll start jalapenos, Urfa bibers, and poblanos. And maybe tabasco.
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Old March 4, 2018   #90
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I'm growing Fish, Candy Cane & one I call "Sirin Thai".

The latter from a plant growing outside the Sirin Thai restaurant in Morristown, NJ.

Not sure if I'll be growing any bells (or eggplant) this season. May put in an extra row of tomatoes.
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