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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #3181
DocBrock
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Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
For my needs yes. I only have to use it in my Earthboxes, to see whether to add the dolomite for the next year.
Great. I think I'm going to pick one up. Thanks!
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #3182
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Kurt, Did you check your leaves/stems with a scope. I have what I think is TRM for awhile now and my plants don't look anywhere near that bad.

Last year when I finally got a cheap scope, I learned that TRM was the culprit to a lot of my problems over the years.

When I first noticed some of the bronze effect this year, I started foliar spraying with soluble kelp. I did it 4 nights in a row. I really think it helped a lot. I did not have any loss of fruit set. It has been way over a month since doing that. Maybe I should try again.

This year, I have not found any of the mature TRM, just eggs and juveniles (I guess). But somehow they are getting on the leaves/stems.
If it is something else, I would love to know what.

Even my 2 seedlings that I started on 3/1 had those same eggs. I sprayed them with Garden Safer neem oil extract.

Last night I sprayed all my younger plants like KARMA Pink, Rebel Alliance.

Last year, I really never got control of the TR mites, so I was just spraying up water in the middle area of the tomato plants. Seemed to keep fruit set going. This year, I bought a mister nozzle to do the same. (way more mist than the mister on the hose nozzle). I've done it once but need to start regularly doing it now that it is hot.

I hope Marsha chimes in for a diagnosis for you.
All the plants are in containers by the pool,all screened in.I have numerous magnifying glasses,all strengths.The damage I see on my plants is old age.I use fresh material every year.Infected/ and carrying bugs will over winter up north,maybe die,
.Here bugs do not go away,unless you get something to eat them.Whether be it another bug,a microscopic beneficial,pesticide,sun whatever.All my spent mediums are taken and used in hardier plant growths,citrus mangoes,etc.They can take the beating.Solarizing is good for the folks who reuse medium year after year,amending as you go.For me after every season all tools,pots,tables,etc.gets nuked.reuse of infected/compromised mediums is counterproductive in my book.In 10 b,it is rough on most of your maters,the bugs got bugs,soil is alive all year.
.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #3183
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Originally Posted by Barb_FL View Post
Kurt, Did you check your leaves/stems with a scope. I have what I think is TRM for awhile now and my plants don't look anywhere near that bad.

Last year when I finally got a cheap scope, I learned that TRM was the culprit to a lot of my problems over the years.

When I first noticed some of the bronze effect this year, I started foliar spraying with soluble kelp. I did it 4 nights in a row. I really think it helped a lot. I did not have any loss of fruit set. It has been way over a month since doing that. Maybe I should try again.

This year, I have not found any of the mature TRM, just eggs and juveniles (I guess). But somehow they are getting on the leaves/stems.
If it is something else, I would love to know what.

Even my 2 seedlings that I started on 3/1 had those same eggs. I sprayed them with Garden Safer neem oil extract.

Last night I sprayed all my younger plants like KARMA Pink, Rebel Alliance.

Last year, I really never got control of the TR mites, so I was just spraying up water in the middle area of the tomato plants. Seemed to keep fruit set going. This year, I bought a mister nozzle to do the same. (way more mist than the mister on the hose nozzle). I've done it once but need to start regularly doing it now that it is hot.

I hope Marsha chimes in for a diagnosis for you.
All the plants are in containers by the pool,all screened in.I have numerous magnifying glasses,all strengths.The damage I see on my plants is old age.I use fresh material every year.Infected/ and carrying bugs will over winter up north,maybe die,
.Here bugs do not go away,unless you get something to eat them.Whether be it another bug,a microscopic beneficial,pesticide,sun whatever.All my spent mediums are taken and used in hardier plant growths,citrus mangoes,etc.They can take the beating.Solarizing is good for the folks who reuse medium year after year,amending as you go.For me after every season all tools,pots,tables,etc.gets nuked.reuse of infected/compromised mediums is counterproductive in my book.In 10 b,it is rough on most of your maters,the bugs got bugs,soil is alive all year.All the plants outside like the gardenias they constantly get thrips,two kinds,long skinny,and mini,large bull ants harvest the honeydew(thrip crap)drag it into thatch,make big nests,.A solid two hour soil drench,add the favorite pesticide miticde,that has been premixed and you will get to the infestation below ground,up to a foot for some enterprising chinch bugs,grubs,palmetto bug( our name for cockroach,flys 4 inch wingspans).Each one of those pinchers,suckers transmit the crud through piercing in most cases.Plus the bugs don’t just die at one application,you might have different stages,above,and below ground.The one I hate are the Scale,armadillo looking little army’s,with the shell as a tent,those suckers crawl out from underneath.They mimic the bark.Below ground is were they hide here.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #3184
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Some mood lifting pictures from this morning. Nothing like watching bees make food for you.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3185
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Default Interesting experience outside of Starbucks today

So on my way into Starbucks this morning, I saw a very elderly man who had obvious symptoms of Parkinson's disease hunched over the bushes in the parking lot landscaping. I walked over just to investigate whether he needed help or not. Turns out he was Brazilian and spoke next to no English, but was picking some small red fruits and putting them in his pocket. It took me a minute to figure out the details with the language barrier, but he called them pitanga and had planted the vines inside of the bushes to hide them from birds and so the branches would act as a trellis. He gave me a couple to eat, very interesting flavor. Tasted like a cross between a tomato and a tart cherry. I looked it up and is called a Suriname cherry and is a very healthy superfood. If you ever have a chance to taste one, I recommend it. I saved the pit from one that I ate to try and grow myself.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3186
ginger2778
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So on my way into Starbucks this morning, I saw a very elderly man who had obvious symptoms of Parkinson's disease hunched over the bushes in the parking lot landscaping. I walked over just to investigate whether he needed help or not. Turns out he was Brazilian and spoke next to no English, but was picking some small red fruits and putting them in his pocket. It took me a minute to figure out the details with the language barrier, but he called them pitanga and had planted the vines inside of the bushes to hide them from birds and so the branches would act as a trellis. He gave me a couple to eat, very interesting flavor. Tasted like a cross between a tomato and a tart cherry. I looked it up and is called a Suriname cherry and is a very healthy superfood. If you ever have a chance to taste one, I recommend it. I saved the pit from one that I ate to try and grow myself.
Brock, the bushes are readily available at HD. Or at least they used to be. Quite a common hedge. Be careful- fruit fly larvae are frequently found in the fruit. We ate them all the time as a kid.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3187
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well in that case maybe I'll just sneak into his patch and grab a few if I want some. Last thing I want is another bug problem around my house. They were tasty though.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3188
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well in that case maybe I'll just sneak into his patch and grab a few if I want some. Last thing I want is another bug problem around my house. They were tasty though.
They have a tomato called Pitanga, named after them. Looks just like them. You might want to tear the fruit off the seed and inspect it before eating, if you catch my drift. Blech!
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3189
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After trying for several seasons to find a variety of Brussels Sprouts that would do well here in native soil, I finally found one that did marvelously. It produced lots of nice sprouts and still has many to harvest. The variety is Tasty Nuggets hybrid, and I bought the seeds from Burpees. But, wouldn't you know it, they no longer carry this variety and I can't get another hit on it in Google. Back to the drawing boards.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3190
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After trying for several seasons to find a variety of Brussels Sprouts that would do well here in native soil, I finally found one that did marvelously. It produced lots of nice sprouts and still has many to harvest. The variety is Tasty Nuggets hybrid, and I bought the seeds from Burpees. But, wouldn't you know it, they no longer carry this variety and I can't get another hit on it in Google. Back to the drawing boards.
They will probably have an improved one like they do with the broccoli. I grew BS once and had a tree with a lot of nubs, but no real fruit. Once it got hot, I pulled it.

How was your broccoli season? I planted a lot fewer this year; they were really good especially took off when I started foliar feeding them., did a few of the cut and come again but didn't think they were worth the water. I had started new seeds by then.
They are all under shade cloth now.

I sowed a few beans 2 days ago (seeds and inoculant from 2017; inoculant expiration date was Dec 2017). I used the same areas that I had broccoli growing. I will update if they germinate. I put 2 or 3 in each hole to give better odds.

What else are you growing? Did you grow any more tomatoes after yours froze in January?
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3191
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They have a tomato called Pitanga, named after them. Looks just like them. You might want to tear the fruit off the seed and inspect it before eating, if you catch my drift. Blech!
That's funny, if you saw how I ate it you'd cringe. Just popped it right in my mouth! Haha
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3192
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They will probably have an improved one like they do with the broccoli. I grew BS once and had a tree with a lot of nubs, but no real fruit. Once it got hot, I pulled it.

How was your broccoli season? I planted a lot fewer this year; they were really good especially took off when I started foliar feeding them., did a few of the cut and come again but didn't think they were worth the water. I had started new seeds by then.
They are all under shade cloth now.

I sowed a few beans 2 days ago (seeds and inoculant from 2017; inoculant expiration date was Dec 2017). I used the same areas that I had broccoli growing. I will update if they germinate. I put 2 or 3 in each hole to give better odds.

What else are you growing? Did you grow any more tomatoes after yours froze in January?
Do you have good luck with foliage feeding your other veggies, like tomatoes? I've been too afraid to try it because I'm afraid to get the leaves wet. I try to keep them as dry as possible, even moving them to an overhang that still gets sun if there's rain in the forecast.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3193
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They will probably have an improved one like they do with the broccoli. I grew BS once and had a tree with a lot of nubs, but no real fruit. Once it got hot, I pulled it.

How was your broccoli season? I planted a lot fewer this year; they were really good especially took off when I started foliar feeding them., did a few of the cut and come again but didn't think they were worth the water. I had started new seeds by then.
They are all under shade cloth now.

I sowed a few beans 2 days ago (seeds and inoculant from 2017; inoculant expiration date was Dec 2017). I used the same areas that I had broccoli growing. I will update if they germinate. I put 2 or 3 in each hole to give better odds.

What else are you growing? Did you grow any more tomatoes after yours froze in January?
Barb,
What are using for foliar spraying? I have grown to hate hose end sprayers. I'm fertilizing bush beans which are quite large. Somewhat difficult to reach in there and sprinkly fertilizer along to row. I hope to pick some beans in a week or so. Broccoli is coming to an end for me and we didn't freeze any this season. Back to frozen Organic from the big store. Ugh! We are cutting back on the size of our gardening as well. I have approx 40% of the tomato plants that I had in the past. But they are looking fairly good. Arugula looks good and is ready to pick. It should last a good long time. It makes a good salad and is so easy to grow. So glad to hear from you. I haven't communicated with you in a long time.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3194
ginger2778
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That's funny, if you saw how I ate it you'd cringe. Just popped it right in my mouth! Haha
Just a little extra protein haha.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #3195
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Do you have good luck with foliage feeding your other veggies, like tomatoes? I've been too afraid to try it because I'm afraid to get the leaves wet. I try to keep them as dry as possible, even moving them to an overhang that still gets sun if there's rain in the forecast.
in University of Florida's Master Gardeners course that I took, they said foliar feeding really didn't do much, but it look like it was effective because people always spray to the point where it gets a drip runoff, and that was actually putting nutrients into the roots and soil. So it look like foliar feeding was doing a good job, but the professor said it was really the roots just absorbing the nutrients and that leaves don't absorb much in the way of nutrients
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