Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating peppers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old April 25, 2019   #1
Tropicalgrower
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Zone 7 Southern Oregon
Posts: 173
Default What to plant,what to plant?Opinions or advice appreciated.

I have been perusing the threads here trying to decide on a few pepper varieties to try.I have looked at the local nurseries,but have seen very little other than the standard Cal Wonder bells etc.(not that there is anything wrong with those).


I did find an Aji Rico,and a Dangjo Cheong Yang (hey,I was desperate for something different) .After being directed to Chileplants.com by Shrinkwrap,I thought I would ask you kind folks for some direction.

So,I am considering:

Corno di Toro or Marconi

Doe Hill (I have grown DH before as well as Red Cheese,and both are dandy little peppers).

Guajillo (this just sounds like a great pepper to me)

Ajvarski (this is another that sounds like a standout)

Question is,how well do they yield on average? Which leads to the question,How many plants should I get to provide for the wife and I ?

The wife uses a lot of peppers in her stir fry and whatnot.We had a few plants in the PI,but none yielded very well for us.We grew Corno Di Toro,Marconi, Czech Black (I grew this one for the color)...Trinidad Seasoning...Jimmy Nardello.I will be growing in containers.

Thanks for any help or advice.


On edit:


Maybe I'll order a Corno di Toro and a Marconi and 2 each of Guajillo and Ajvarski and do the Doe Hill next year.That should give me an idea of what to expect yield wise.
__________________
I soiled my plants.

Last edited by Tropicalgrower; April 26, 2019 at 01:25 AM.
Tropicalgrower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #2
Tropicalgrower
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Zone 7 Southern Oregon
Posts: 173
Default Can peppers be cloned?

I don't see why not?



I could run a few cuts in my cloner,but I wonder if the cloned plant would have time to produce mature fruit?Course,we are talking about buying a plant,and then raising it to the point it could yield clones,and then if those clones would have time to produce fruit?



Anybody have success with, or have attempted to clone peppers?
__________________
I soiled my plants.
Tropicalgrower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #3
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,252
Default

Doe Hill is a small plant with fairly low yield, but the peppers are good.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #4
xellos99
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: wales uk
Posts: 238
Default

Yield usually depends on size of pots, quality of soil and growing skill.

I have seen many tests where 100 litre pot was used and 160 litre pot used.

Grown exactly the same, in the same place at the same time.

The one in the 100 pots consistently get 1000 chilis.

The 160 litre pot gets 2500 chillis.

Yes you can get 2500 from a single plant and the test was done in UK in a hoop house ( our weather is like Seattle so much worse than yours by far )
xellos99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #5
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,356
Default

I always end up with more hot peppers than I can use, and not enough sweets. Whether they produce more or I use so much less, it always seems to work out that way.

That being said, Guajillo is a great choice for a mild seasoning pepper, I love em. They are a big plant so lots of yield potential.
In the sweet peppers, Sweet Banana has produced the most for me, but the taste is not special. Jimmy Nardello is a good producer for us. All the thicker fleshed varieties like Doe Hill are pretty slow here and lower yields, although they can be worth the wait. You will need more plants to get a target yield, I think.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #6
SQWIBB
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Philly
Posts: 512
Default

Grow what you will use!
Depends on what you will be using them for, will you be making sauces, canning, smoking, dehydrating, stuffing, appetizers.


For me

I would pick one of the other for Marconi or Corno Di Toro, unless your getting the Corno Di Toro Giallo for color
The Marconi are very Similar to the Corno di Toro Russo (red) but in my opinion the Red Marconi are better. The "Giallo" has been a heavy producer for me.


Giallo (Yellow)

















Red Marconi








There's also a Giant Marconi but to be honest I think it's the same as the regular Red Marconi and may be a seed mix up?.







Jimmy Nardello makes for a fine sweet frying pepper.












SQWIBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #7
SQWIBB
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Philly
Posts: 512
Default

Poblanos and Jalapenos have to be my favorite hots.


Jalapenos for stuffing, smoking, canning, pickling.












Poblanos for Roasting, Canning, Smoking, Stuffing.
















Anaheims/jalapenos






Hot Sauces














Depending on what I want to can or preserve I alternate what I grow but I always grow certain peppers regardless
The last several years I went heavy on hot peppers for sauces but backed off this year because I have a ton of different hot sauces to keep me happy!
SQWIBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #8
ddsack
Tomatovillian™
 
ddsack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Northern Minnesota - zone 3
Posts: 2,904
Default

Quote:
There's also a Giant Marconi but to be honest I think it's the same as the regular Red Marconi and may be a seed mix up?.
Giant Marconi is an F1 Hybrid, and Red Marconi is OP. When I grew them the same year, Giant Hyb was much larger than the Red OP, seeds from Sand Hill.





I also got variable shapes from one of the hybrid plants.



Your peppers do indeed look very similar, and I know there has been confusion on this for a few years, so who knows what has been accidentally or purposefully dehybridized. At any rate, they are both very good thick walled peppers.


Here they are in comparison to other sweet peppers. Sharpie marker at the top for scale.



__________________
Dee

**************

Last edited by ddsack; April 26, 2019 at 10:31 AM.
ddsack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #9
SQWIBB
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Philly
Posts: 512
Default

I'm wondering if all my Marconi's were Giant Marconi after looking at your images. You OP Red Marconi look about as big as my Poblanos. I also got a couple squirrely looking peppers on my Giant Marconi plant. Seeds were from a forum member. I'm betting they were all Giant Marconi.



I planted some Red Marconi this year , seeds are from Bakers Creek so I guess I'll find out.



Also your Jimmy Nardello pepper is huge!


I do like the thick wall on the Marconi "Giant/Red"? lol.


SQWIBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 26, 2019   #10
Tropicalgrower
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Zone 7 Southern Oregon
Posts: 173
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zipcode View Post
Doe Hill is a small plant with fairly low yield, but the peppers are good.

I grew Doe Hill before,and we really liked it.Also grew Red Cheese which we also liked.I will grow DH again next year.


Quote:
Originally Posted by xellos99 View Post
Yield usually depends on size of pots, quality of soil and growing skill.

I have seen many tests where 100 litre pot was used and 160 litre pot used.

Grown exactly the same, in the same place at the same time.

The one in the 100 pots consistently get 1000 chilis.

The 160 litre pot gets 2500 chillis.

Yes you can get 2500 from a single plant and the test was done in UK in a hoop house ( our weather is like Seattle so much worse than yours by far )

I'd like to try growing in 5gal buckets,and a few 7gal fabric grow bags.I have quite a few 5gal buckets is why I want to try them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
I always end up with more hot peppers than I can use, and not enough sweets. Whether they produce more or I use so much less, it always seems to work out that way.

That being said, Guajillo is a great choice for a mild seasoning pepper, I love em. They are a big plant so lots of yield potential.
In the sweet peppers, Sweet Banana has produced the most for me, but the taste is not special. Jimmy Nardello is a good producer for us. All the thicker fleshed varieties like Doe Hill are pretty slow here and lower yields, although they can be worth the wait. You will need more plants to get a target yield, I think.

I'm really looking forward to growing the Guajillo,but I might opt to buy the bags of dried that they sell in the market for just this year.


We also grew the Jimmy Nardello,and it is a great pepper.I bought a Banana Pepper at the local nursery because the wife likes it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SQWIBB View Post
Poblanos and Jalapenos have to be my favorite hots.


Depending on what I want to can or preserve I alternate what I grow but I always grow certain peppers regardless
The last several years I went heavy on hot peppers for sauces but backed off this year because I have a ton of different hot sauces to keep me happy!

Good golly Sqwibb.You quite obviously enjoy peppers...and you take excellent photos as well.


Wow.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ddsack View Post
Giant Marconi is an F1 Hybrid, and Red Marconi is OP. When I grew them the same year, Giant Hyb was much larger than the Red OP, seeds from Sand Hill.

I also got variable shapes from one of the hybrid plants.


Your peppers do indeed look very similar, and I know there has been confusion on this for a few years, so who knows what has been accidentally or purposefully dehybridized. At any rate, they are both very good thick walled peppers.


Here they are in comparison to other sweet peppers. Sharpie marker at the top for scale.

I called the Master Gardener association here locally,and have found a Giant Marconi,so that is nice.


They didn't have anything else other than the normal Cal Wonder and whatnot tho.


Would you guys think that it is probably too late to start from seed? I'd really like to try a couple of Ajvarski's,but the shipping is pretty expensive.
__________________
I soiled my plants.
Tropicalgrower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27, 2019   #11
Nan_PA_6b
Tomatovillian™
 
Nan_PA_6b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,776
Default

I asked about sweet peppers earlier:
http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=48290
and decided, based on everyone's reviews, to do Ajvarski this year.

I did Doe Hill Yellow last year and it is delicious. Mine were not very productive, but I have clay for soil and only about 5 hours of sun.

In the future, start peppers two months before last frost date. But this year, try something from seed that has a short DTM.
Nan_PA_6b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 27, 2019   #12
Tropicalgrower
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Zone 7 Southern Oregon
Posts: 173
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nan_PA_6b View Post
I asked about sweet peppers earlier:
http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=48290
and decided, based on everyone's reviews, to do Ajvarski this year.

I did Doe Hill Yellow last year and it is delicious. Mine were not very productive, but I have clay for soil and only about 5 hours of sun.

In the future, start peppers two months before last frost date. But this year, try something from seed that has a short DTM.

Thanks Nan.


I'd really like to maybe order a couple of the Ajvarski,but golly,the shipping makes them very expensive.I may just have to do without them for this year,and plan ahead for next year.We just got so busy with the recent move and the attendant adjustments,that time got away from us.
__________________
I soiled my plants.
Tropicalgrower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 28, 2019   #13
Shrinkrap
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: N. California
Posts: 483
Default

Wow Squibb!

I'm going to love this thread.

I usually grow my smaller peppers in 5 gallon "self watering"/sub-irrigation buckets.

I love growing chinenses, but have so many frozen, dried, ground and sauced, I'm only growing one hot one this year; seed saved from my mother in law's yellow Scotch Bonnet. I grow some miler chinenses seasoning peppers too. I will be growing an overwintered Fresno. Fresno and Serrano are my everything day hots.

I got some nice seeds in a trade this year, most that seem to be from the middle East, and so e with ties to Turkey, where my son just got married! Most seem to be used ground or dried, but I hope to use some fresh too.



I also got some cubanelles in a trade, and those will be my sweets.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_20190425_170841.jpg (309.0 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20190425_170813.jpg (480.7 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20190425_170728.jpg (358.7 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20190426_170033.jpg (386.3 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20190426_165953.jpg (356.8 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20190426_165852.jpg (372.6 KB, 18 views)

Last edited by Shrinkrap; April 28, 2019 at 02:59 PM.
Shrinkrap is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:35 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★