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Old May 14, 2019   #1
xellos99
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Default Disease already. Please help ID

Put them into the glasshouse very early this year to get a head start but nights have been cold and the plants are always wet in the morning.

I started to notice what looked like the beginnings of early blight / other disease so about a week ago I sprayed all the plants with dithane 945 to try to stop an outbreak ofwhatever it was.

No luck it looks to be spreading and im not even sure exactly what it is.

The dithane 945 residue is still visible so just ignore that.

Any ideas ?

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Old May 14, 2019   #2
clkeiper
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it doesn't look like disease to me. nutritional maybe
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Old May 14, 2019   #3
xellos99
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it doesn't look like disease to me. nutritional maybe
I will have to see how it plays out I guess. Funny enough I have sungold and gardeners delight and only the sungolds seem affected really.

I mixed concentrated chicken manure pellets into the soil this year instead of using liquid feed, it is possible I overdosed the soil and the sungold are sensitive to it or something.

Fingers crossed it does not kill them.
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Old May 14, 2019   #4
ginger2778
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It's not early blight. It's an iron or magnesium deficiency. Give it a good vegetable fertilizer that has all the micronutrients in it. That first photo brownish spot looks like nothing much, an injury in some way to that 1 leaf.
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Old May 14, 2019   #5
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Cold can cause nutrient deficiencies. Phosphorus is typical and you get purpling, but other physiological ills are not unusual either. You can get potassium deficiency symptoms too in overcast weather due to low light. It is not that easy to tell K vs N vs Mg deficiency so consider what ferts you used and also the conditions.

In a glasshouse situation, I find it better not to spray anything on the leaves ever, take advantage of the fact they are never rained on, which is a giant plus for tomato leaf health, generally. Once a week, pick off all the leaves that look nasty, because even if it's physiological a disease can get in there on the damaged leaves, so it's as well to remove them.
It's true I don't bother with sprays, some people do and in some situations it must be worthwhile or necessary, but I assume everyone has to remove diseased plant material from tomatoes, whether you are spraying or not. I just find that doing so is actually enough (and ferts help too of course!). So whenever you prune and tie up, make sure you get the bad leaves off and the plant will of course produce more in a jiffy.
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Old May 14, 2019   #6
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I found you this page which, although they are selling fertilizers, has imo the best pictures of tomato leaf deficiency symptoms, along with very clear descriptions that really help - whether it is on young leaves or old; marginal or interveinal etc etc all the details necessary to figure out which nutrient or micronutrient is the problem.
https://www.haifa-group.com/crop-gui...lant-nutrition
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Old May 23, 2019   #7
xellos99
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Much more advanced state of the problem may show its true identity now I hope.

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Old May 23, 2019   #8
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Old May 23, 2019   #9
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Old May 23, 2019   #10
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Old May 23, 2019   #11
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If I saw that on my tomatoes I'd say "Early Blight". And then I'd chop off all the bad leaves and get them out of the growing area. Sanitation pruning accomplishes two things:
1) Take away spores to reduce spread of the whatever, and
2) Improve air circulation to reduce damp areas where spores germinate
IMO this has to be done whether you spray or not, and no matter what disease/pest/deficiency is involved. Leaves in the process of rotting are full of micro-organisms you do not want handy to your plants. Ruthless pruning is required.



If this is only on the lower leaves, I would suggest feeding the plants as well.
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Old May 23, 2019   #12
xellos99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
If I saw that on my tomatoes I'd say "Early Blight". And then I'd chop off all the bad leaves and get them out of the growing area. Sanitation pruning accomplishes two things:
1) Take away spores to reduce spread of the whatever, and
2) Improve air circulation to reduce damp areas where spores germinate
IMO this has to be done whether you spray or not, and no matter what disease/pest/deficiency is involved. Leaves in the process of rotting are full of micro-organisms you do not want handy to your plants. Ruthless pruning is required.



If this is only on the lower leaves, I would suggest feeding the plants as well.

That was my initial thought of what is was but looking at the brown areas there is no concentric circles at all. The photos of early and late blight I found show those circles.

Then someone said deficiency and it does look like a couple of deficiency types can look but the strange thing is that I have 5 gardeners delight and 9 sungold.

All 9 sungold were together in a row and all show the symptoms and the GD did not at all. But now the two GD plants that are right next to the Sungold row are showing symptoms the same which points to a spreading habit from one plant to its neighbour.

Its not simple to ID these things at all IMO like some people make out.
It could be to do with the cold, the soil, a fungus, a deficiency, watering.

It has baffled me and the changes I made this year like burying them very deeply, using microrizer, using concentrated chicken manure and taking plants from a neighbour. I will not repeat next year. Will keep it simple next time
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Old May 23, 2019   #13
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We were discussing root depth on another forum and it was pointed out that the root ball can be planted too deep and that it will actually die due to the poor soil and lack of oxygen at that depth.

Yes, the buried stems will grow new roots but the plant may suffer in the meantime since the taproots died.

How deep did you plant your seedlings?
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Old May 23, 2019   #14
xellos99
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We were discussing root depth on another forum and it was pointed out that the root ball can be planted too deep and that it will actually die due to the poor soil and lack of oxygen at that depth.

Yes, the buried stems will grow new roots but the plant may suffer in the meantime since the taproots died.

How deep did you plant your seedlings?
I would say the bottom of the root ball must have been about 12 inches under and the top of the root ball maybe 6 inches under.

Maybe a bit deeper than that, it was a month ago so memory is a little hazy.
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Old May 23, 2019   #15
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I don't know what your soil is like but 12in down would be below where my best soil is located so the root ball would be in an area without good soil in my case if I planted that deep
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