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Old September 10, 2018   #31
JRinPA
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I have been starting okra under lights but not until May. I have had some issues with damping off the last two seasons. I think my best bet is not to use any compost and just to sprout them and get them out under AG19 right away.

I picked again today and still have nice sized pods of clemson spineless but this might be it for a while with those cool nights. I expect the pods currently on will slow down and harden up at smaller size, and this round of flowers probably failed. Okra is kind of a hedge for me; if it is hotter than I like, at least we'll get okra.
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Old September 11, 2018   #32
Rajun Gardener
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I spoke to a buddy that I sent seed to and he's having the same problem with production. He said he also planted our usual okra and has enough for the year already. Next year I'm going back to the other cowhorn.

If anyone wants seeds of either of these send me a pm.

JRinPA you need to try the cowhorn that I have, they grow longer and stay soft and most importantly they produce. It's easy to tell if they're hard too, if I can't snap the pod off the plant then I know it's hard.
Here's some from last year
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Old September 11, 2018   #33
JRinPA
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I'm up for trying different types, sure thing.

How fast do those pods get to size? "Good" for me with clemson spineless is 3" to a nice 6" in two days. I'll pick every other day and just pick the ones that are bigger than 4". If I pass on a 4" and then miss a day picking, that one will likely have a hardish nose. I understand cowhorn is known for getting bigger while staying soft, but whether it will actually grow faster here is what I'm wondering. Or if it will simply need more sun energy than 40 degree of latitude can give it.

Last year was something else though, I was still picking okra into 2nd week of October. Maybe this year will be similar. I did realize just the other day that the spot I have the okra this year actually has some September afternoon shade, ...there are trees to the south that don't shadow that row in mid-summer, but are doing so now. Next year it is going back to last year's spot with 100% full sun.
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Old September 13, 2018   #34
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is it feasible to grow okra in pots? i never tried any and would like to try growing some....but am hesitant to take up space in the garden for something i am not sure i'll even like
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Old September 15, 2018   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRinPA View Post
I'm up for trying different types, sure thing.

How fast do those pods get to size? "Good" for me with clemson spineless is 3" to a nice 6" in two days. I'll pick every other day and just pick the ones that are bigger than 4". If I pass on a 4" and then miss a day picking, that one will likely have a hardish nose. I understand cowhorn is known for getting bigger while staying soft, but whether it will actually grow faster here is what I'm wondering. Or if it will simply need more sun energy than 40 degree of latitude can give it.
That's about how fast Cowhorn grows too. I usually leave a 4" okra and 2 days later it's a good 6-7" and still soft.
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Old September 15, 2018   #36
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is it feasible to grow okra in pots? i never tried any and would like to try growing some....but am hesitant to take up space in the garden for something i am not sure i'll even like
Okra will grow in a pot just keep them watered and fertilized.

You've never eaten fresh okra? Maybe you should find some fresh okra at a market and try it out before you spend 4 months growing it. Make sure it's fresh when you get some.

Goggle some recipes, I like it fried, boiled and smothered. I use the smothered okra in gumbo or as a side dish. It's awesome with shrimp added.
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Old September 15, 2018   #37
ChristinaJo
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Hey Rajun,
Do you still have those okra seeds? I can grow them for next year. I grew "stubby" this year. It was pretty,but I had to pick it really ,really small. It got hard pretty quick.
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Old September 16, 2018   #38
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I do have seeds left and will send you some. PM me your addy.

Weren't you on BG a while back?
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Old September 16, 2018   #39
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Okra is just good eating, so many ways to prepare it. The snap test is a good one, I use that myself, plus if the tip is getting hard, it's probably a goner for seed.
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Old September 19, 2018   #40
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I think I picked on Friday, finished the last of that on Monday, then picked again Tuesday afternoon on the way to an evening stand. Biggest okra haul of the year so far when I got back to that garden. The biggest I have ever grown or seen, honestly. A good number of 6-7-8" pods, and I don't think they're too tough yet. Still soft noses. Find out tonight for sure.
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Old September 21, 2018   #41
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Rajun, those seed you sent me are now producing okra like crazy. I love how the plants stay shorter than standard Cowhorn which is usually too tall to pick by this time of the year. My good buddy grew the regular Cowhorn and can no longer pick his because it is so tall now. That is the reason I quit growing Cowhorn okra about five year ago.

After thinning the plants so they are about six feet apart and switching them a couple of times they really went to town. The plants are now all between 5 and 7 feet tall but they are almost six feet across with numerous producing stems. I only have ten plants now and can't give the okra away fast enough so I am going to ask if anyone knows a good way to freeze okra. I would love to have a couple of gallons put away for gumbo in the winter months.

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Old September 22, 2018   #42
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Rajun, those seed you sent me are now producing okra like crazy. I love how the plants stay shorter than standard Cowhorn which is usually too tall to pick by this time of the year. My good buddy grew the regular Cowhorn and can no longer pick his because it is so tall now. That is the reason I quit growing Cowhorn okra about five year ago.

After thinning the plants so they are about six feet apart and switching them a couple of times they really went to town. The plants are now all between 5 and 7 feet tall but they are almost six feet across with numerous producing stems. I only have ten plants now and can't give the okra away fast enough so I am going to ask if anyone knows a good way to freeze okra. I would love to have a couple of gallons put away for gumbo in the winter months.

Bill
It really couldn't be simpler. Fresh from the garden is best. Trim the stems to about a 1/16 inch, wash it and allow to drain in a collander for a couple of minutes, arrange in a single layer on a cookie sheet in the freezer over night. You can stack trays on top of each other. When the Okra is frozen, remove from the freezer and pour it into a good quality freezer bag (not a slider). Remove the excess air from the bag using a straw. Repeat until the bag is full. Start another bag. It will keep until you have Okra again the next year.

To use, pour the amount you need into a colander and run cold water over the Okra to partially thaw it. (remove the air from the bag and return the extra Okra to the freezer) If you're going to cook it whole like on top of your blackeyed peas, just trim off the stem. Partially thawed also works if you're using it chopped for fried Okra or in soups or stews. Remove the stems and chop as needed. If you need to bread it, it'll be ready by the time you get it chopped.

As long as you keep the air removed from the bag so the Okra doesn't get freezer burn you can't tell this from fresh. enjoy, claud
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Old September 22, 2018   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saltmarsh View Post
It really couldn't be simpler. Fresh from the garden is best. Trim the stems to about a 1/16 inch, wash it and allow to drain in a collander for a couple of minutes, arrange in a single layer on a cookie sheet in the freezer over night. You can stack trays on top of each other. When the Okra is frozen, remove from the freezer and pour it into a good quality freezer bag (not a slider). Remove the excess air from the bag using a straw. Repeat until the bag is full. Start another bag. It will keep until you have Okra again the next year.
Agree! This is the exact same method used here and it works like a charm. Easy peasy!
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Old September 22, 2018   #44
b54red
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saltmarsh View Post
It really couldn't be simpler. Fresh from the garden is best. Trim the stems to about a 1/16 inch, wash it and allow to drain in a collander for a couple of minutes, arrange in a single layer on a cookie sheet in the freezer over night. You can stack trays on top of each other. When the Okra is frozen, remove from the freezer and pour it into a good quality freezer bag (not a slider). Remove the excess air from the bag using a straw. Repeat until the bag is full. Start another bag. It will keep until you have Okra again the next year.

To use, pour the amount you need into a colander and run cold water over the Okra to partially thaw it. (remove the air from the bag and return the extra Okra to the freezer) If you're going to cook it whole like on top of your blackeyed peas, just trim off the stem. Partially thawed also works if you're using it chopped for fried Okra or in soups or stews. Remove the stems and chop as needed. If you need to bread it, it'll be ready by the time you get it chopped.

As long as you keep the air removed from the bag so the Okra doesn't get freezer burn you can't tell this from fresh. enjoy, claud
Thanks. I'll try it.

Bill
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Old September 26, 2018   #45
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I am going to stop picking my first plant that started making so the rest of the pods it makes can be used for seed. It has been my second best producing plant and it was far earlier than any of the others. I don't know if it will make a difference but I like to save seed from plants that perform better than most hoping those traits will be passed on.

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