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General information and discussion about cultivating all other edible garden plants.

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Old September 21, 2019   #16
CassInVic
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Hi Worth, yes I think it would make a lovely wooden spoon - it will look something like this: https://www.australianwoodwork.com.a...-kitchen-spoon


Tracey - popped back to say I think aliums would work well with your plant mix as well - chives, garlic chives or elephant garlic maybe.
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Old September 21, 2019   #17
Whwoz
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Some nice pieces on that site Cass.

Worth our hardwoods make very nice implements, with Red Gum (of which there are four species commonly called that) being probably the most durable.
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Old September 21, 2019   #18
Tracydr
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Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Muscadines, way less troublesome than grapes and native to the US.
Makes the most unbelievable wine.
We have so many wild muscadine on our property and patients bring piles of them to the clinic, it’s not worth the garden space. If other grapes fail I’ll yank them and try something else in their place.
Also planting some oregano,thyme,marjoram,several types of lavender. Maybe cardoons. This area will have a water feature and I hope to make a pergola with seating area underneath.
Oh, plenty of figs.
What else?considering an olive tree or two.
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Old September 21, 2019   #19
Tracydr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CassInVic View Post
Hi Worth, yes I think it would make a lovely wooden spoon - it will look something like this: https://www.australianwoodwork.com.a...-kitchen-spoon


Tracey - popped back to say I think aliums would work well with your plant mix as well - chives, garlic chives or elephant garlic maybe.
Or,yes,I plant alliums all over so I’m sure there will be various alliums in this space- elephant garlic,chives,garlic chives, potato onions, bunching onions, and some decorative alliums.
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Old September 21, 2019   #20
Tracydr
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Sounds lovely! Don't forget garden sage - even if we don't eat it often, the flowers are lovely and the leaves make the best ever bandage for cuts or splinters.
Great idea! I almost forgot sage and I need a new sage plant ,cheickens killed mine.
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Old September 21, 2019   #21
Tracydr
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If you could plant some almonds and olives, you'd pretty much have it sewn up.
The almond trees bloom in February on the Mediterranean. Their flowers are the first thing to appear as sign of spring. Just gorgeous to see fields of these from a train window, even better to have a few in your own garden. You need two to pollinate.
I wonder if almonds can be grown in zone 8 North Carolina?
I was considering an olive tree in a pot,I’m not sure if it will be winter garden hardy here but can go in with the citrus.
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Old September 21, 2019   #22
Tracydr
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Something was eating at me about what to plant.
Just remembered.
A bay tree, they are evergreen and you can collect a leaf anytime of the year.
Fresh and dried have two different flavors too.
Nothing says Mediterranean like a bay tree.
A bay tree is a great idea! Even if I need to keep it potted.
Also,edible flowers such as borage,roses,nasturtiums,echinacea,chamomile?
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Old September 21, 2019   #23
Tracydr
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I had to look up what those were. They look great. I am one zone north of their hardiness rating, but maybe it would still be possible to grow them, given enough care.
You sure they won’t grow in zone 6? I think I’ve heard they grow in MO,Arkansas,OK,TN and VA. I know they grow in some zone 6 mountain areas of NC.
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Old September 21, 2019   #24
bower
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I'll second the request to see pics of both of your mediterranean gardens. Not too many of those classics are hardy enough for us, so I have to live vicariously...
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Old September 29, 2019   #25
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I have some of the plants ordered,lavender,grapes,pomegranate. The herbs I’m starting from seed and I need to pick up some lime and a bag of oyster shell from tractor supply to really give some of the plants like lavender drainage + higher ph.
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