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Old October 6, 2015   #16
Aerial
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I love polyantha roses. They practically take care of themselves, and easily propagated with cuttings.

Quoted from heirloomroses:

Polyantha - Compact roses that are forerunners of the modern Floribundas. The most prolific bloomers of all roses with large clusters of small flowers similar to ramblers (about 1” wide). Polyanthas are generally 2-3 feet high with foliage that is small, narrow and disease resistant; winter hardy and ideal for small gardens or pots.

More carefree roses:
http://www.pallensmith.com/articles/...r-every-garden

Last edited by Aerial; October 6, 2015 at 02:42 PM.
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Old October 6, 2015   #17
Elliot
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the topic of knock out roses makes me cry. We had this gorgeous bush that was maybe five years old and the gardener was told to clean the weeds in the area and took out the entire bush with it. They were gorgeous roses
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Old October 6, 2015   #18
nancyruhl
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I have to go with knock outs also. They grow will and flower often up north in the summer and fall, but I see them blooming year around in Florida. That is quite a range of growing conditions. The Weeks roses do similarly well up here, and I have some "Nearly Wild" roses that grow well up at the cottage with little effort.
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Old October 8, 2015   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carriehelene View Post
Wait and see if it survives your winters. Our last 2 winters here in upstate NY destroyed roses that were zoned 4, forget 5's and up. Rugosas came thru like champs though. Knockouts, like Austins, whimpered and keeled over. I've never had to do a thing to my rugosas, and they've been there for 10 years.
I've had some English Lavenders overwinter all (but that super cold winter two years ago) so I have my fingers crossed and my bale of straw ready.

Last edited by BackyardFarm; October 8, 2015 at 05:45 PM.
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Old October 8, 2015   #20
amberroses
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For easy roses, Knockouts aren't my favorite. I like the Drift roses better because I find them more attractive. Many of the newer Kordes roses like Beverly, Savannah, Fiji, etc... are way more satisfying to grow than Knockouts. I'd also suggest a few others like Belinda's Dream, Tea roses, China roses, etc.., but I'm not sure they would do well up North. It is best to ask someone in your area for more specific answers. I'm in Florida. Cold is not an issue here.

This is my personal opinion. I don't mean to offend Knockout fans. Knockouts do have some good traits.
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Old October 9, 2015   #21
Worth1
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Originally Posted by amberroses View Post
For easy roses, Knockouts aren't my favorite. I like the Drift roses better because I find them more attractive. Many of the newer Kordes roses like Beverly, Savannah, Fiji, etc... are way more satisfying to grow than Knockouts. I'd also suggest a few others like Belinda's Dream, Tea roses, China roses, etc.., but I'm not sure they would do well up North. It is best to ask someone in your area for more specific answers. I'm in Florida. Cold is not an issue here.

This is my personal opinion. I don't mean to offend Knockout fans. Knockouts do have some good traits.
No offense taken but something to consider.
Knockout roses are a care free rose that is practically maintenance free here in Texas.
Some of the other roses you mentioned will drive you crazy here trying to get them to grow and make flowers.
Knockouts are good for the person that doesn't want to spend all of their time fooling with roses.
At least where I live.
I have tried tea roses and every day there was another hoard of critters eating on them and needed constant watering.

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Old October 9, 2015   #22
amberroses
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Are you thinking of hybrid teas or old fashioned tea roses? Tea roses are ones like Anna Olivier, Duchess de Brabrant, and such. Most old tea roses are pretty tough. All roses here require some attention to watering and occasional chilli thrips, even Knockouts. I imagine the roses I mentioned would do even better in Texas than here.
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Old October 9, 2015   #23
amberroses
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But Teas probably wouldn't tolerate the cold up North, so I can't recommend them for everyone.
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Old October 9, 2015   #24
feldon30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliot View Post
I had a knock out rose bush and gardener destroyed it. I am now in a new one
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliot View Post
the topic of knock out roses makes me cry. We had this gorgeous bush that was maybe five years old and the gardener was told to clean the weeds in the area and took out the entire bush with it. They were gorgeous roses
I think we have identified the problem. Knockout roses are foolproof. Unfortunately they invented a better fool -- You just need to get rid of him.
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Old October 9, 2015   #25
kurt
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Although not a true Rose,but looks like one I was given a Black Swan Desert Rose from our Vietnamese neighbor who has about 200 of different varieties of them.Some are two to three foot tall with basketball sized trunks.Very impressive and the easiest to care for.He has sold the larger ones for up to $1000 bucs each to some real diehard interior designers and photographers.Almost like a Bonsai type looking Rose/Tree.


http://search.aol.com/aol/image?q=Desert+Rose
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Last edited by kurt; October 9, 2015 at 02:36 PM. Reason: images and spelin
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Old June 16, 2016   #26
christian1971
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I'm having great success with David Austins-Gertrude Jeckyll. Planted bare root in mid May. Now a good 2 feet tall and 6 bulbs.
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