Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating onions, garlic, shallots and leeks.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 21, 2016   #1
Carriehelene
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 292
Default Advice wanted re my garlic please

On Monday the 27th, I'm leaving for 2 weeks. As you can see from the picture, the leaves on my Magic garlic are starting to die back. Not quite ready yet, but not sure what's going to happen over the next 2 1/2 weeks. Is it better to pull them a little early, or a little late?



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Carriehelene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21, 2016   #2
habitat_gardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: California
Posts: 2,347
Default

What's the weather forecast?
If heavy rain is expected, I'd pull now.
If it looks like it's going to be dry, I'd leave them.
Light rain? Less than 50% chance of rain? Judgment call. I'd probably pick some, if any rain is forecast.

I haven't grown garlic for a year or so, but I do grow onions, which should not be watered for a couple weeks before picking. So my recs are based on keeping them dry for a couple weeks just before picking.
habitat_gardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21, 2016   #3
TomNJ
Tomatovillian™
 
TomNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Floyd VA
Posts: 644
Default

If you plan on eating or replanting the garlic within the next 3-4 months, then I would leave them in the ground to size up. Even if you lose the wrappers the cloves will be fine until replanting time, and you can freeze any cloves not eaten by that time. I harvest mine when only three leaves are mostly green. Most have fine wrappers, and any that may split are eaten or frozen first.

TomNJVA
TomNJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21, 2016   #4
Nematode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 1,523
Default

Mine look the same and probably wont pull them until August, or at least until 3-4 leaves are dried up.
Nematode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21, 2016   #5
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,445
Default

The common advice I read is to let 2/3 of the leaves go yellow, and in my climate it does take several weeks for them to dry down once it's started.
If you harvest early they say there will be more wrappers and longer storage life. But when growing up garlic from bulbils the smaller plants also had fewer leaves - I was a bit worried to see just one wrapper over the individual cloves on some of them - but they kept perfectly all winter even so.

I wonder if the amount of wrappers is more important from a commercial standpoint where the garlic is being shipped and stored in variable conditions before it gets to the consumer. I picked up a garlic at the store last week when I ran out, and really noticed how much more wrappers they had than my own. Sadly some of the cloves had gone soft anyway!
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 21, 2016   #6
GrowingCoastal
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Vancouver Island Canada BC
Posts: 479
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomNJ View Post
If you plan on eating or replanting the garlic within the next 3-4 months, then I would leave them in the ground to size up. Even if you lose the wrappers the cloves will be fine until replanting time, and you can freeze any cloves not eaten by that time. I harvest mine when only three leaves are mostly green. Most have fine wrappers, and any that may split are eaten or frozen first.

TomNJVA

How do you freeze your garlic?
GrowingCoastal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22, 2016   #7
velikipop
Tomatovillian™
 
velikipop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Langley, BC
Posts: 679
Default

They look fine and probably can stay in the ground for a another two to three weeks. I would pull one of the bulbs and see what it looks like if you are really concerned. If you see the cloves then it's time to harvest, but I suspect they can stay for a while longer. You might want to pull some of the grass and weeds around the plants. The measure I use is that at least the bottom four to six leaves have turned brown before I harvest, but sometimes I will pull them sooner.
__________________
I'll plant and I'll harvest what the earth brings forth
The hammer's on the table, the pitchfork's on the shelf

Bob Dylan
velikipop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22, 2016   #8
guruofgardens
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: zone 5 Colorado
Posts: 779
Default

I'd leave them in the ground.
guruofgardens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22, 2016   #9
brownrexx
Tomatovillian™
 
brownrexx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Southeastern PA
Posts: 683
Default

They look like they are at least 2 1/2 weeks away from harvest to me too.

They have a lot of green leaves left.
brownrexx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22, 2016   #10
Carriehelene
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 292
Default

Leave them it is! Thanks to everyone who advised, I was worried.
Carriehelene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 22, 2016   #11
TomNJ
Tomatovillian™
 
TomNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Floyd VA
Posts: 644
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrowingCoastal View Post
How do you freeze your garlic?
I peel and chop the garlic and put it into one-quart freezer bags, press it flat to about 1/4" thick, zip and freeze. To use you just break off the amount you need (breaks easily) and re-zip the bag. The texture is softened and the flavor slightly less sharp, but just use more. The softer texture makes it ideal for mixing in sour cream to make a great chip dip!

I freeze at least a hundred bulbs each year and average about six bulbs per bag. Peeling is much easier by shaking about 50 cloves at a time vigorously for 30 seconds inside two large metal bowls, one inverted over the other. Knocks off over 80% of the skins and loosens the rest. Bruising is not important since they will be chopped.

Regarding wrappers, commercial growers need more layers, usually 5 or 6, as they lose some in handling, shipping, and displaying. It is their harvest practices that are most often quoted on the Internet. Home growers only need 2 or 3 wrapper layers for good storage, so three mostly green leaves works for most varieties I've tried.

TomNJVA
TomNJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 23, 2016   #12
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 825
Default

I have personally found that the bulbs still will grow a lot after the first leaves are yellow. If it's not diseased, you'd be throwing away a lot of crop harvesting early.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 24, 2016   #13
Ozark
Tomatovillian™
 
Ozark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ozark, Mo.
Posts: 162
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomNJ View Post
I peel and chop the garlic and put it into one-quart freezer bags, press it flat to about 1/4" thick, zip and freeze. To use you just break off the amount you need (breaks easily) and re-zip the bag. The texture is softened and the flavor slightly less sharp, but just use more. The softer texture makes it ideal for mixing in sour cream to make a great chip dip!

I freeze at least a hundred bulbs each year and average about six bulbs per bag. Peeling is much easier by shaking about 50 cloves at a time vigorously for 30 seconds inside two large metal bowls, one inverted over the other. Knocks off over 80% of the skins and loosens the rest. Bruising is not important since they will be chopped.

Regarding wrappers, commercial growers need more layers, usually 5 or 6, as they lose some in handling, shipping, and displaying. It is their harvest practices that are most often quoted on the Internet. Home growers only need 2 or 3 wrapper layers for good storage, so three mostly green leaves works for most varieties I've tried.

TomNJVA
TomNJ, I really appreciate the information in this post. As I've posted elsewhere I'm growing garlic for the first time this season - about 30 starts were given to me last year of an unknown variety that has been growing and reseeding itself on a Missouri farm here since sometime in the 1800's. About half the leaves are yellow now, so I'll be digging the bulbs up before long.

I'm going to put aside and dry the cloves I'll use for replanting in October, but I'm certainly going to chop, bag, and freeze the garlic we're going to eat according to your method. That sounds REAL handy - thanks!
Ozark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 24, 2016   #14
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,498
Default

Okay here is the hands on information I have about this.

I have one crop of garlic I pulled earlier this year because I planted at two different times.
The first crop I left in a little to long and the heads split.
This stuff is stored in the garage and I just tested one of them it had been in there for months.
The clove was fresh and juicy and as crunchy as a nut.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:00 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★