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Old October 2, 2016   #1
oakley
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Default Need pepper help...WWYD?

I've not grow peppers in years. I do try every year and just get sacked for reasons like not enough hot weather, too damp, short growing season, cut worms, etc.

This year three plants did really well for me. And stopped at some farm stands in my area the past few weeks, bought some interesting peppers, saved seeds.

Last week i was out on LongIsland NY and picked up three pepper plants loaded with fruit in tiny 4 inch pots...i picked the ripe ones and roasted with onions and garlic, pureed a sauce and into the freezer in small packets. (i'll use in soups and salsa all winter)

The plants are still loaded. I've read all the postings about what to do. I'm thinking i should re-pot in gallon grow bags and try to over-winter. On the kitchen deck for now with a few micro tom experiments for another month, harvest, then into the garage with my fig tree?...or keep them in a sunny spot to continue growing indoors all winter?

Pic is the three plants purchased and pics of some of my harvest and some purchased at farm stands. The larger medium sized red is one of the best sweet peppers i have ever had. Dark and thick/heavy for its size. Saved seeds.
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Old October 2, 2016   #2
dmforcier
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I think it depends on how much sun they will get during the winter. Short days and lots of overcast will make the production slow way down. If you think they will get enough sun, then pot up. Otherwise, I suggest that you trim them back and leave in the small pots for the winter.

Be careful not to let them stay wet.
Peppers take much less water in the winter. Let them tell you when they want water.
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Old October 2, 2016   #3
brownrexx
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Are you sure that the peppers that you purchased at the farm stands are not hybrids? If so, saving seeds may not give you plants that produce peppers like the ones that you bought.
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Old October 2, 2016   #4
oakley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brownrexx View Post
Are you sure that the peppers that you purchased at the farm stands are not hybrids? If so, saving seeds may not give you plants that produce peppers like the ones that you bought.
yes, i think i need to pay attention to that...i have good seed from Artisan and others that should get more attention than what i found locally...
I'll just ry and keep these alive through the winter so i have, maybe, a head start nest spring....
So new to me having a much linger growing season with so much heat and hot weather.

I just read about keeping peppers alive in suspended cold and re-vived in the spring...
I'll just do a NorthEast version of just that. Trial like i do with so many other plants...
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Old October 2, 2016   #5
greenthumbomaha
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I'm about to decide which peppers to overwinter too. Those are very healthy productive plants for a small pot late in the season. Mine in pots are yellowing. I would go ahead and pot them up one just one size larger. There are still a few weeks of decent weather and longer than dead of winter days. I might be overwintering stunted plants if I keep the lil' potted ones, so why risk that with yours.

One year I started my peppers too soon and they had to wait to long in a little pot. Their production had been notably compromised. Slow steady growth is optimal. I have learned the hard way.

- Lisa
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Old October 4, 2016   #6
kchd..
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oakley View Post

I just read about keeping peppers alive in suspended cold and re-vived in the spring...

I'll just do a NorthEast version of just that. Trial like i do with so many other plants...

That's exactly what I did last winter. I kept the plants in the garage down here in zone 7b/8a. They never got below freezing, but it was definitely cold. The garage has windows but the light is still not enough to support growth. The plants dropped most or all their leaves. I only watered 1x or 2x per month and it was a minimal amount, just enough to keep the roots from becoming desiccated. In the spring, I started exposing the plants to the sun again, and as it started to warm up they started to leaf out again.
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Old October 4, 2016   #7
AlittleSalt
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WWYD? Me, being that I live in Texas, I would let them grow until they quit producing, and then start seeds indoors January 1. However, I know that isn't what you were asking.

I am interested in how to overwinter peppers in colder climates. I agree with greenthumbomaha that slow and steady is much better for the plants. I have read that many people overwinter super-hot pepper plants here in Texas. Some in zones 9 and 10 can do it in-ground.

I have one pepper plant still growing and producing little tiny ornamental peppers, and I wish I could experiment with overwintering it - but I know it is infected with RKN. It makes tiny peppers that are green, yellow, white, orange, purple, and red, and in the past two weeks, it has set countless new peppers. The new ones are around the size of a BB. I don't know if the size of the peppers are due to the RKN infection or what?
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Old October 4, 2016   #8
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Sounds like Numex Twilight. The ones that I've grown had pods roughly the size of vintage Christmas tree lights. I started a couple for the girls at the hydro store this year. I stopped by last week to see that one of them was magnificent in profusion and color, yet with pods no more than 3/4" long. This is the same seed I used for the big pod plants. The plant doesn't get full sun, and in a container on concrete doesn't have an RKN problem, but I can't really explain why the pods are so small.
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Old October 5, 2016   #9
oakley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kchd.. View Post
That's exactly what I did last winter. I kept the plants in the garage down here in zone 7b/8a. They never got below freezing, but it was definitely cold. The garage has windows but the light is still not enough to support growth. The plants dropped most or all their leaves. I only watered 1x or 2x per month and it was a minimal amount, just enough to keep the roots from becoming desiccated. In the spring, I started exposing the plants to the sun again, and as it started to warm up they started to leaf out again.
Yes, Ive done that somehow with other plants like my figs. (garage near the back close to the hose, drop their leaves, water a bit every six weeks...and bring back very slow in the Spring) In the past i've had even a basil plant go all winter in a south window and a bay tree...rosemary was always easy until this house. I seem to get whiteFly and spiderMites easily here. My MeyerLemon Tree i bring into the kitchen in a south window. Just never thought about peppers until i purchased these plants.

Managed a stop by my favorite spice store yesterday...expensive but a massive selection. I just needed UrfaBiber. Been out of it for near a year now. Found an interesting NoraChili from Murcia Spain...i'll start a seed test viability this weekend.

My favorite flavor in a pepper is habanero but always looking for something to add to it for my smoked mix. (really looking forward to trying the non-spicy Hab)

I also bought some Hatch fresh peppers from this same spice store flown in from NMexico.

Any great success hint to save seeds for best storage to start January. ?
Dry on paper towel for a week or so. ?
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Old October 5, 2016   #10
oakley
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"[QUOTE=AlittleSalt;594951]WWYD? Me, being that I live in Texas, I would let them grow until they quit producing, and then start seeds indoors January 1. However, I know that isn't what you were asking."

I may try and keep one of the Habs growing. And lots of various seed i've collected to start early January. Did not realize the Hatch was so large...so lots of seed. (i do realize it will not be grown in Hatch but at least i'm tasting the real thing now to compare later)
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Old October 5, 2016   #11
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Surprised how hot the Hatch is. Sliced open this morning to empty out some seeds to dry.
Went on-line to research and ended up ordering a five lb bag of fresh green BigJim, free shipping.
https://www.hatch-green-chile.com

They offer a few varieties from mild to very hot. (i paid the exact price in the city)
Still have about 50lbs of tomatillos in the garden i plan on smoke/roasting this weekend and like to add some peppers to that mix.
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