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Old November 9, 2016   #1
slugworth
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Default grafted apple tree fert

I have a few grafted apple trees that are about 6 years old and never had blossoms.
I wonder if I should fertilize now or wait until spring?
What type of fertilizer?
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Old May 3, 2017   #2
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Rabbit or mice ate a lot of the bark off one this winter.
I was going to cut it down but noticed today it finally had blossoms.
The two mates next to it have none,so it must have been the chewing that triggered the blossoms on that one.
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Old May 3, 2017   #3
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Fertilize it now... I never saw this or I would have responded long ago. just get something on it for now. as simple as rabbit poop, 10-10-10- or a fruit tree fertilizer... but it needs to eat also if it is to produce any good fruit. it usually takes no less than 3 years and sometimes you may have blossoms but no fruit set for years or never if you don't have a pollinator for that tree. we have a small orchard and one tree is at least 10 years old (Enterprise, I do believe) never seen an apple on it yet. it blossoms, it has little apples set and then they eventually all fall off. if there is no apples on it this year it is going to be fire wood. 10 years is ridiculous. the only apple I know of that takes that long or longer is Northern Spy. sorry to hear the one got eaten but maybe if it isn't too bad it will heal over.
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Old May 3, 2017   #4
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Doing more research I see the baldwin needs other varieties to get pollinated,so it may turn out to be a sad story anyway.My mother had the original in her yard longer than me and it had sentimental value.I got the grafts about 1 year before the 2011 freak oct storm killed the original tree.I have a crabapple nearby but that might not be good enough.
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Old May 3, 2017   #5
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check out Adams county Nursery and look at their pollinator chart. it will tell you what is good for a particular tree for cross pollination. I don't thing the crab apple will work.
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Old May 4, 2017   #6
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Right off hand I cant think of an Apple that doesn't need a different pollinator.
thehat you want and other people have already done the work for you is one that blooms at the same time.
All of our trees were protected with what they call I think hardware cloth around the trunks.
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Old May 5, 2017   #7
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needs 2 different pollinators.

https://www.orangepippintrees.com/po...er.aspx?v=1188
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Old May 5, 2017   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slugworth View Post
that is interesting. I didn't know there were trees that needed two different pollinators.
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Old May 5, 2017   #9
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my mom had the original tree in an orchard with different varieties.
Baldwins produce every other year,so the next blossoms will be in 2 years.
A guy that runs an orchard cut all his trees down because the apple wasn't a good seller.
I am able to buy some every 2 years from his personal tree stash.
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Old May 26, 2017   #10
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some pollination did occur with a nearby crabapple,probably around 5% of the blossoms.
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Old June 30, 2017   #11
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got around 1 doz baby apples but the leaves have brown spots.
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Old June 30, 2017   #12
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Also if you put in some nitrogen fixing plants beside your fruit trees they wont need fertilizer and will produce more abundantly. This guy figured it out https://permacultureapprentice.com/h...lture-orchard/

Pretty cool and easy to do.
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