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General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

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Old July 9, 2016   #106
Fred Hempel
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It is about 60 days here. Sometimes a bit sooner and sometimes a bit later.
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Old July 10, 2016   #107
NarnianGarden
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OK. Mine was planted in the end of May, so hopefully the first fruits will be ready by late July..
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Old July 11, 2016   #108
SharonRossy
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Mine was planted beginning of June and then we had a cold spell which it didn't' like at all. It looks like it's finally taking off, but I'm waging a war with squirrels. Green tiger on the other hand is going nuts!
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Old February 27, 2017   #109
tarpalsfan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by remy View Post
With both plants being PL, I know I put the wrong seed into the packet (Packets are filled to order.) We did speak awhile back, and I said it could be any PL plant in my L-Z selections. It is most likely a tasty beefsteak.
Remy
Hi Remy:
The tomato seed mix up was a GOOD mistake for me, hon! The plants were potato leaf, produced BIG pink, delicious tomato's, and they resisted blight longer than any other tomato plant-even lasting longer than the 'disease resistant' hybrids. Those plants did well when every tomato in the garden was a fail.
I still have some of that seed too.
.
I will grow some Maglia Rosa tomatoes this year. I can't wait to try them
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Old June 9, 2017   #110
gorbelly
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My Maglia Rosas got a touch of herbicide exposure shortly after I put them out in late April, so I'm not sure they're behaving normally. It seemed very very slight, which is why I kept them instead of starting replacements when it happened.

Is it normal for Maglia Rosa to have ectopic floral meristems? Most of the trusses, in fact, appear to be forming on the rachises of the compound leaves. Photos:





Also, the foliage is a bit twisty. Would you say it's within the normal range for this variety, or is it abnormal?

In addition, the flowers have a slightly "spindly" appearance. Is this from herbicide, or can it be normal under certain environmental conditions?


Here's a view of an entire plant:


The plants are also showing some root primordia, but those could happen not just because of herbicide but also because of the very wet weather we've been having in the Northeast.

Just wondering whether this looks more or less normal to you guys who are familiar with MR considering the environmental conditions this season or if there's definitely a discernible continuing influence from the herbicide.
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Old June 10, 2017   #111
shule1
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gorbelly,

What herbicide did you use?
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Old June 10, 2017   #112
gorbelly
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I don't use herbicides. It was drift from my neighbor who is really unfriendly, so I have no idea which it was.
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Old June 10, 2017   #113
gorbelly
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MR has a wispy habit, so I don't expect it to look like a "normal" compact plant. But I'm not sure what I should expect as normal for MR.
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Old June 10, 2017   #114
KarenO
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I think the plant looks fine overall.
KO
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Old June 10, 2017   #115
shule1
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Maglia Rosa is a low bush tomato in my experience (if left to sprawl), without dense foliage. There are larger plants that match the low bush description (e.g. Pink Cheeks), but I agree that Maglia Rosa is quite compact. Pink Tiger is the vine version, I've read.

Tim's Black Ruffles was a higher bush than Pink Cheeks and Maglia Rosa (and TBR was a smotherer). My tomato that was supposed to be Jim Dandy was an even higher bush (about as bush-like as you could want; but not as bad of a smotherer); really an awesome tomato (I don't know if it breeds true, but if anyone in the US wants seeds, feel free to let me know; it was a multiflora, sweet, yellow cherry with rich flavor; very prolific; seems to grow easily in clay soil; didn't even fall over uncaged until late in the season when it got enormous; it was already quite large before it fell over, though; I imagine it may stay upright forever if pruned; I wouldn't be that surprised if you could make a small topiary with it, LOL, except it's not terribly dense).

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Old June 10, 2017   #116
clkingtx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shule1 View Post
Maglia Rosa is a low bush tomato in my experience (if left to sprawl), without dense foliage. There are larger plants that match the low bush description (e.g. Pink Cheeks), but I agree that Maglia Rosa is quite compact. Pink Tiger is the vine version, I've read.

Tim's Black Ruffles was a higher bush than Pink Cheeks and Maglia Rosa (and TBR was a smotherer). My tomato that was supposed to be Jim Dandy was an even higher bush (about as bush-like as you could want; but not as bad of a smotherer); really an awesome tomato (I don't know if it breeds true, but if anyone wants seeds, feel free to let me know; it was a multiflora, sweet, yellow cherry with rich flavor; very prolific; seems to grow easily in clay soil; didn't even fall over uncaged until late in the season when it got enormous; it was already quite large before it fell over, though; I imagine it may stay upright forever if pruned; I wouldn't be that surprised if you could make a small topiary with it, LOL, except it's not terribly dense).
I would love to have seeds for Jim Dandy, it sounds like something we would like.
Thanks!
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Old June 10, 2017   #117
Cole_Robbie
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I agree that the MR plant pictured above looks normal for that variety.
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Old June 10, 2017   #118
gorbelly
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Karen and Cole_Robbie, thanks! I knew the plant would obviously survive and had decent vigor, but I wasn't sure whether to expect any atypical behavior at fruiting. So this puts my mind to rest, as I promised my backup plant to my brother.

I'm pretty fascinated by the ectopic nature of the flower trusses. Do any other varieties do that?
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Old June 10, 2017   #119
gorbelly
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Do those of you who have grown it recommend I start seeds for a succession planting? It's listed many places as "semi-determinate", which can mean a lot of different things.

Is it a compact indeterminate like a dwarf tomato that steadily produces over the growing season, or does it produce in flushes and taper off in productivity of the flushes as the season progresses? One of the article Fred provides said it only produced for five weeks, albeit heavily.
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Old June 10, 2017   #120
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I'm wondering too, Gorbelly. I think I'm going to root some suckers from my existing Matoka plants.
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