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Historical background information for varieties handed down from bygone days.

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Old October 11, 2012   #61
clkeiper
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Azoychka Russian. I grew it two years in a row....The first year it had a few tomatoes on each plant. Not enough to justify the space the plant took up. The second year it had two and neither ripened before frost...another waste of space. The flavor wasn't bad on the one I did get to try, but it was very unproductive for me.

Yellow pear...YUCK.
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Old October 12, 2012   #62
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Azoychka Russian. I grew it two years in a row....The first year it had a few tomatoes on each plant. Not enough to justify the space the plant took up. The second year it had two and neither ripened before frost...another waste of space. The flavor wasn't bad on the one I did get to try, but it was very unproductive for me.

Yellow pear...YUCK.
The variety name is just Azoychka, without the word Russian although it is from the former USSR, now the CIS.

Opinions are so variable as to both the red and yellow pears. One to try if you want to is Medovaya Kaplya which is a small yellow one that has a short neck and looks like it's tied at the top and it sure has much more taste than standard Yellow Pear.

As I've said before, for every variety that someone says they love it and will grow it again, an equal number of folks will say it didn't produce, they didn't like the taste, which is both personal and percetual, and on and on it goes.

Good thing there are about 7-8 K OP varieties available commercially and probably several hundreds of hybrids.
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Old August 9, 2013   #63
Alfredo
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Default A Devil of a tomato.

Jersey Devil.

I've tried growing this heirloom tomato variety twice in two different gardens and nothing, maybe one or two tomatoes while everything else grows pretty good. Has anyone had better results with this variety? I'm sure someone somewhere has...and if you have, what were your growing conditions?

I would honestly try to give this variety a third attempt, but would really want to know if anyone has grown it well and tasted it, to give me their opinion on it if it's worth the trouble.

Thanks,
~Alfredo
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Old August 9, 2013   #64
kath
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Jersey Devil.

I've tried growing this heirloom tomato variety twice in two different gardens and nothing, maybe one or two tomatoes while everything else grows pretty good. Has anyone had better results with this variety? I'm sure someone somewhere has...and if you have, what were your growing conditions?

I would honestly try to give this variety a third attempt, but would really want to know if anyone has grown it well and tasted it, to give me their opinion on it if it's worth the trouble.

Thanks,
~Alfredo
I tried it twice and also had terrible luck with this one.
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Old August 9, 2013   #65
Alfredo
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I tried it twice and also had terrible luck with this one.


~Alfredo
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Old August 9, 2013   #66
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Default Good results with Azoychka

I have two plants of it and plan on using them again next year, I probably got 50 or more tomatoes off of one of the plants. They are best when the bottom blushes, everyone enjoyed them, although a couple of tomato friends do prefer other yellow types. I grow in a greenhouse, and they did well, very well. I ended up growing them on the dry side too, no cracks and perfect looking fruit. Sorry if I spelled the name wrong.
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Old August 10, 2013   #67
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Yellow pear...YUCK.
I believe yellow pear has different strains. Anyway, the yellow pear I grow isn't bad. It has a following and is productive.

I personally think they are too bland, but they sell.
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Old August 10, 2013   #68
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Originally Posted by Alfredo View Post
Jersey Devil.

I've tried growing this heirloom tomato variety twice in two different gardens and nothing, maybe one or two tomatoes while everything else grows pretty good. Has anyone had better results with this variety? I'm sure someone somewhere has...and if you have, what were your growing conditions?

I would honestly try to give this variety a third attempt, but would really want to know if anyone has grown it well and tasted it, to give me their opinion on it if it's worth the trouble.

Thanks,
~Alfredo
Jersey Devil was introduced by theTomato Seed Company out of Metuchen, NJ and Ibought seeds when they were still in business, so yes, I've grown it.

And well I remember their thin paper catalog which was printed in red and green.

A typical long red paste similar to many long red pastes I've grown.Taste is better than most long red pastes,but nothing extraordinary about it.

Linda at TGS started listing it a few years ago.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...218094475.html

Above is an older thread from GW with more opinions about Jersey Devil.

Carolyn
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Old August 10, 2013   #69
Alfredo
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Jersey Devil was introduced by theTomato Seed Company out of Metuchen, NJ and Ibought seeds when they were still in business, so yes, I've grown it.

And well I remember their thin paper catalog which was printed in red and green.

A typical long red paste similar to many long red pastes I've grown.Taste is better than most long red pastes,but nothing extraordinary about it.

Linda at TGS started listing it a few years ago.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...218094475.html

Above is an older thread from GW with more opinions about Jersey Devil.

Carolyn
Thanks for the background history info Carolyn, and the link as well. I'm going to check it out to see the different opinions on it. Tomato Growers Supply is where I purchased the seeds from, and it's been the only variety i've had this much difficulty growing.

Would you say that San Marzano Redorta is similar to what Jersey Devil is taste wise? Or no? I'm only asking because I've grown it for the past several years. And is there any other paste tomato variety you could reccomend to maybe try? I know from what i've read you post on tomatoville before that you're hesitant to reccomend varieties because everyone has different tastes/growing conditions but I figure if I ask as nice as I can that there's a slim chance you might mention one anyway.

~Alfredo
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Old August 10, 2013   #70
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I believe yellow pear has different strains. Anyway, the yellow pear I grow isn't bad. It has a following and is productive.

I personally think they are too bland, but they sell.
I see this is a thread from the way past.

About YellowPear. WhenI was selling to restaurants and leaving fruits at a nursery forsale, the small red and yellow pears were very popular, and still are today for commercial use particularly.

There aren't different strains of the yellow, but there are two different varieties that I would suggest that are yellow pear shaped and the taste is much superior to standard Yellow Pear,, at least I know it is for Medovaya Kaplya.

http://t.tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Medovaya_Kaplya

and

http://t.tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Yellow_Submarine

I've grown Medovaya Kaplya,offered in myseed offers here but have not grown Yellow Submarine

Carolyn,still wondering why this thread was ever started in the Legacy Forum.
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Old August 10, 2013   #71
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I've grown Jersey Devil the last two years with decent, but not great, production--much better last year than this year. I would put it in the same category as Opalka and Polish Linguisa. I find the fruit of all three to be somewhat hollow and not having much heft. Since my goal is canning and drying, I'm crossing all three off next year's list in favor of some larger, denser, and meatier plum/elongated tomatoes (e.g., Romeo, Ernesto, Nudi Family Heirloom, Speckled Roman).
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Old August 10, 2013   #72
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I've grown Jersey Devil the last two years with decent, but not great, production--much better last year than this year. I would put it in the same category as Opalka and Polish Linguisa. I find the fruit of all three to be somewhat hollow and not having much heft. Since my goal is canning and drying, I'm crossing all three off next year's list in favor of some larger, denser, and meatier plum/elongated tomatoes (e.g., Romeo, Ernesto, Nudi Family Heirloom, Speckled Roman).
Thank you for your input . I do appreciate it. Were Opalka and/or Polish Linguisa more productive for you than Jersey Devil?

I like to use the pastes for sauces too, and some of the bigger varieties for roasting since they tend to hold up well to that type of cooking (San Marzano Redorta for example).

Oh and thank you for mentioning those other plum/elongated varieties, I'm only familiar with the Speckled Roman type out of those. Now i'm going to look those varieities up.

~Alfredo
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Old August 10, 2013   #73
clkeiper
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I am growing the Yellow Submarines from J and L Gardens this year. I have picked just a few and they have been very good. MUCH better than any yellow pear I have found so far.
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Old August 10, 2013   #74
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Thank you for your input . I do appreciate it. Were Opalka and/or Polish Linguisa more productive for you than Jersey Devil?

I like to use the pastes for sauces too, and some of the bigger varieties for roasting since they tend to hold up well to that type of cooking (San Marzano Redorta for example).

Oh and thank you for mentioning those other plum/elongated varieties, I'm only familiar with the Speckled Roman type out of those. Now i'm going to look those varieities up.

~Alfredo
Nothing was really productive this year, so I wouldn't base much on my results. Last year Opalka and Jersey Devil were equally productive which is why they both earned a spot in my garden this year. Polish Linguisa was new this year, and all three produced equally, and none of them ever grew notably large fruit.

Just for the sake of comparison, below are (l-r or top to bottom - depending on how photo loads), Romeo (the first ripe one), Ernesto, Nudi Family Heirloom (it feel off the vine early), George O'Brien (another that might be back next year), and what I've typically seen from Polish Linguisa.

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Old August 10, 2013   #75
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Thanks for the pic! Very helpful. Both the George O'Brien and the Polish Linguisa look very similar in shape to the Jersey Devil.

~Alfredo
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