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Old May 6, 2013   #16
Durgan
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Durgan, Most commonly available potato varieties were selected for short stolons and smaller plants, as well as other traits for machine harvestability. Some of the genetics available thru Tom wagner are selected for flavor/color, berry production, and other traits so still contain genes for "less desirable traits" such as long stolons, thin skins, short dormancy, ect. Varieties like guincho negro and herm 18 will have 6' stolons NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO. But I have found 90%+ varieties need only a moderate hilling to produce a good crop.
Maybe you should address one characteristic, since I have no idea what you are trying to say.

The internet for years has been full of people producing hundreds of pounds of potatoes from vertical hilling as if the tubers grow off the stem similar to a tomato. I have never seen a meaningful clear picture of this type of production and neither has anybody else. I am waiting.
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Old May 7, 2013   #17
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I agree with DURGAN regarding where potatoes grow. I've planted them in 1/2 barrells and 15 gal containers. I've planted them deep and shallow. But whatever way they always grow around the root of the plant. While the deep box planting sounds logical (potatoes growing along the vines) Iv'e never found it to be true. The only thing deep planting is going to do is make you dig deeper for your spuds. There has been a lot of questions and speculation about some of these Garden Editorials as to whether they have actually performed the "new and improved" way of gardening that they profess. Most have not. Rely on the information from those who are experienced from a practical rather than theoretical sense. (See the upside down tomato planter for further cases).
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Old May 7, 2013   #18
Durgan
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I agree with DURGAN regarding where potatoes grow. I've planted them in 1/2 barrells and 15 gal containers. I've planted them deep and shallow. But whatever way they always grow around the root of the plant. While the deep box planting sounds logical (potatoes growing along the vines) Iv'e never found it to be true. The only thing deep planting is going to do is make you dig deeper for your spuds. There has been a lot of questions and speculation about some of these Garden Editorials as to whether they have actually performed the "new and improved" way of gardening that they profess. Most have not. Rely on the information from those who are experienced from a practical rather than theoretical sense. (See the upside down tomato planter for further cases).
Finally a gardener, who uses his eyes and logic. Gardening books leave a lot to be desired. Of course, the hardest group to find is vegetables gardeners. They are few and far between. There are almost none in my area. Large yards and a, good soil, and good climate. Further even if grown most people have no idea how to preserve or store for off season use.
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Old May 7, 2013   #19
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Not trying to start an argument, just stateing that the "improved' varieties i.e. "commercial" varieties have had EXTENSIVE selection AGAINST the traits you are looking for. Saying that, there are THOUSANDS of varieties (mostly native peruvian types)that have not had these traits bred out. Both herm 18 and guincho negro will grow 6' stolons, and don't "nest" their tubers like MOST commercial varieties. As far as photo evidence....I will do my best.
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Old May 7, 2013   #20
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Not trying to start an argument, just stateing that the "improved' varieties i.e. "commercial" varieties have had EXTENSIVE selection AGAINST the traits you are looking for. Saying that, there are THOUSANDS of varieties (mostly native peruvian types)that have not had these traits bred out. Both herm 18 and guincho negro will grow 6' stolons, and don't "nest" their tubers like MOST commercial varieties. As far as photo evidence....I will do my best.

I would very much like to see some varieties that can grow more as the stem is buried. I do not grow potatoes due to space constraints. I would love to see a vertical success as it would indeed get my attention.
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Old May 8, 2013   #21
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I tried this last year with (apparently) two determinate varieties, neither of which worked. Dark Red Norland and Purple Viking.

So this year I am trying this with two varieties that are longer season, with long stolons that set tubers fairly high. Purple Peruvian fingerling and either Papa Chonca or Rose Finn Apple fingerling. I haven't decided which. The others I was intending to use may still be too small this year (Dheera, Morado Ojuda). We shall see.
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Old May 9, 2013   #22
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Both the varieties you used last year are very early/short season varieties. The purple peruvian, and papa choncha should work. What do you mean by "too small"?


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I tried this last year with (apparently) two determinate varieties, neither of which worked. Dark Red Norland and Purple Viking.

So this year I am trying this with two varieties that are longer season, with long stolons that set tubers fairly high. Purple Peruvian fingerling and either Papa Chonca or Rose Finn Apple fingerling. I haven't decided which. The others I was intending to use may still be too small this year (Dheera, Morado Ojuda). We shall see.
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Old May 9, 2013   #23
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By "too small" I mean they are only 1/2" high from TPS sown in March. I'm not sure at what point they will be ready to transplant since they are growing so slowly.

And yes, I had ordered short season potatoes last year. Big mistake. I had thought that by repeatedly burying the stems every few weeks it would force the potatoes in the bins to extend out the season. So this year I am using high tuber setting, longer season potatoes and hope to develop layers of stolons.
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Old May 9, 2013   #24
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By "too small" I mean they are only 1/2" high from TPS sown in March. I'm not sure at what point they will be ready to transplant since they are growing so slowly.

And yes, I had ordered short season potatoes last year. Big mistake. I had thought that by repeatedly burying the stems every few weeks it would force the potatoes in the bins to extend out the season. So this year I am using high tuber setting, longer season potatoes and hope to develop layers of stolons.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-...-of-pota-81760
According to this article from the Seattle Times, potatoes planted inside a box with this method can grow up to 100 pounds of potatoes in just 4 square feet.

The Seattle Times has already built the boxes. Now they should patent the potato. Think of all the land that could be freed up to grow other crops.
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Old May 9, 2013   #25
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That is the exact same design I am using. I modeled mine after that article last year, though mine are slightly larger. 24"x24". I have two.

My notes from mistakes of last year:
1 - don't use short season / early potato varieties.
2 - don't use straw. roots and stolons do not form in straw. though they do in wood chips/shavings/sawdust

Last edited by NathanP; May 9, 2013 at 09:02 PM.
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Old May 10, 2013   #26
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Does the box have to be that tall (4')??? I have one 2x2x2 and gotten a good harvest. Never really weighed it but was at least a bucket full. By the way the picture says it's 4 square feet or do they mean 4 cu'
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Old May 10, 2013   #27
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I would suggest that the Seattle Times article is very exagerated. 100# of potatoes is about 2'x2'x3'......so not much room for dirt in their box.
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Old May 11, 2013   #28
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from some information i have read you must have varieties that have the ability to set tubers as the plant grows. the types commonly found in my area do not have this ability. i regret i was unable to locate the info on this subject. it was on a site that was specifically devoted to this subject..

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Old May 11, 2013   #29
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Yes that is correct. The only way this will work is to find potato lines that set tubers along stolons. Nearly all commercial varieties have been bred to NOT do this.

Traits to look for:
Long season/late season
high setting tubers, close to the ground or above ground level
traditional landraces
wilder types

A couple of good starting places seem to be growing from TPS sold by www.tomwagnerseeds.com
http://www.newworldcrops.com/zen/, or the Kenosha Potato Project http://www.curzio.com/N/PotatoProject.htm

For height, no you do not need 4'. I opted for 3.5' high with mine, but that was probably based more on amount of available lumber that I had on hand.
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Old May 11, 2013   #30
Durgan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanP View Post
Yes that is correct. The only way this will work is to find potato lines that set tubers along stolons. Nearly all commercial varieties have been bred to NOT do this.

Traits to look for:
Long season/late season
high setting tubers, close to the ground or above ground level
traditional landraces
wilder types
Nobody has ever seen such a potato plant as you describe. They simply don't exist. Sort of like the unicorn or philosopher's stone. Never has any meaningful picture been posted anywhere indicating the nonsense propagated by the Seattle Times. People have tried to fudge meaningless photos with a bit of Yankee blarney.
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