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Old July 18, 2013   #16
efisakov
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Old July 18, 2013   #17
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Try a slow bolting variety. There are several including Calypso which has done well for me in SE Tennessee. Definitely keep planting throughout the hot months and cut and use as much as you can before it bolts.
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Old July 19, 2013   #18
Alfredo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chalstonsc View Post
Still learning. Last year grew cilantro to large, beautiful mature plants which survived the winter. Replanted in a new location and not long after getting established it started to go to seed and stopped producing new lush foliage as in the past. Been doing this for couple months or so. Does it ever go back to producing foliage as it did at this time last year, or is all it is capable of doing at this point is to try to make seed?
Hey chalstonsc,

As others have already noted, once the lacy foliage starts growing, the cilantro will go to flower, then seed. Sometimes the seed drops and you'll get cilantro growing again. If I haven't cut the cilantro by the time its flowering, I usually just leave it to attract beneficial insects, and I kind of like how the white flowers look in contrast to whatever other plant I have growing next to it. Also the seeds (also known as coriander) make a VERY fragrant Lemon scent when you grind/crush them, great for adding to roasted vegetables if you haven't tried it. One cilantro plant with seeds on it will give you a lot of seeds for saving. I would recommend at least letting one of your cilantro plants go to flower/seed so you can grow your stock of cilantro/coriander seed for both growing more cilantro, and maybe some seed for seasoning.

On another note, have you ever tried growing the perennial herb "Culantro?" It goes by many names depending on the region, it also goes by the names "Mexican Coriander," "Long Coriander," "Thai Parsley" and "Recao (in puerto rico)." If you like the taste of Cilantro, you just might like the similar but stronger tasting "Culantro." There are many seed companies that sell it, though probably under the name "Long Coriander."

~Alfredo

Last edited by Alfredo; July 19, 2013 at 09:52 AM. Reason: grammar
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Old July 19, 2013   #19
efisakov
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Hey chalstonsc,

As others have already noted, once the lacy foliage starts growing, the cilantro will go to flower, then seed. Sometimes the seed drops and you'll get cilantro growing again. If I haven't cut the cilantro by the time its flowering, I usually just leave it to attract beneficial insects, and I kind of like how the white flowers look in contrast to whatever other plant I have growing next to it. Also the seeds (also known as coriander) make a VERY fragrant Lemon scent when you grind/crush them, great for adding to roasted vegetables if you haven't tried it. One cilantro plant with seeds on it will give you a lot of seeds for saving. I would recommend at least letting one of your cilantro plants go to flower/seed so you can grow your stock of cilantro/coriander seed for both growing more cilantro, and maybe some seed for seasoning.

On another note, have you ever tried growing the perennial herb "Culantro?" It goes by many names depending on the region, it also goes by the names "Mexican Coriander," "Long Coriander," "Thai Parsley" and "Recao (in puerto rico)." If you like the taste of Cilantro, you just might like the similar but stronger tasting "Culantro." There are many seed companies that sell it, though probably under the name "Long Coriander."

~Alfredo
Thanks, Alfredo, interesting info about Culantro. I will check it out. I do agree with you, blooming cilantro smells awesome. I was surprised first time I grew it.
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Old June 9, 2014   #20
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Last summer, I discovered a recipe that made the best salsa I've had since I did a lot of traveling in the southwest. It calls for a LOT of cilantro, which really makes it. I decided that this year, I'd try growing my own cilantro.

I'd never done it before, so I *knew* there was limited chance for success. I bought some seeds from Johnnyseeds and planted a few back in March. By time most of my tomatoes a other veggies were starting to see some serious height, these were still only a single spindly stalk with one leaf that couldn't even support its own weight. Ok, live and learn. I'd do better next year.

I still wanted to grow some cilantro, so at the beginning of May, I bought some from a local nursery - a 4" pot with a healthy bunch growing. In mid-may, I planted both the nursery-bought and my original seedlings.

The seedlings are now growing like gangbusters with very healthy leaves, some over an inch across. The nursery plant looked good for a couple weeks, but now, I think it's bolting. I have what I believe others have called the lacy leaves.

Is there something I could have done to prevent this? Should I pick off this lacy stuff? Will normal leaves grow back in their place? On that nursery plant, I pinched some of the wide leaves at the lower level, and they smell as I'd expect. The lacy stuff smells similar, but definitely not the same. I don't know if I want to ruin a batch of salsa with it.

Next year, I'll definitely plant more seeds, because these are looking great - better than anything I've found in a supermarket.



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Old June 9, 2014   #21
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Even though I would never grow it cilantro grows well in the south during the winter months.

It is just too abundant and cheap in the store for me to grow it myself here in Texas.
Plus as I have said here before most people dont know how to cook with it.
They seem to over do it like any other fad herb that comes around.
The same with hot peppers which I consider another fad crop.
You shouldn't taste nothing but cilantro in your food and it shouldn't be so hot you cant eat it.

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Old June 9, 2014   #22
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Cilantro has a fairly short life cycle and the ferny leaves indicate it is ready to go to seed. Picking them off may "hold" the older leaves for you a short while, but any new leaves will continue to be seed leaves. The best way to keep cilantro around is to keep doing successive new seedings all summer. It really is frustrating to coordinate cilantro with ripe tomatoes, because the cilantro seems to grow best in the cooler weather of early summer. I end up pulling up the entire plant, washing and drying it, then freezing it whole, then putting it in a plastic bag and crushing the leaves and stems to crumble them for later use. Pick out the stem pieces you don't want to use.
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Old June 9, 2014   #23
enchant
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Thanks, Dee. Sounds like good advice. I'm going to plant several more cilantro today. I'm glad to know that they freeze well. My salsa recipe certainly grinds them all up, so there's no need for them to have nice perky leaves once defrosted.
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Old June 9, 2014   #24
Dewayne mater
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When it flowers (I guess that's bolting?) it can make a beautiful spray of tiny white flowers that I'm told fancy restaurants will pay for to use as a garnish. Some of those flowers will turn to seed. These "seeds" at first are green, soft, and have a delicious cilantro punch. Amazing in salads, salsas, dips, omelettes etc. We've been eating them frequently for a couple of weeks now, since it got hot in N. Tx. If they are happy with their spot (at my house, the love a spot that is shaded except for about 3 hours a day) the will reseed themselves from those seeds and next year, you'll have cilantro start growing anywhere from fall, to winter and up until the summer heat gets it. Love it!

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Old June 9, 2014   #25
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There are several different varieties of cilantro, too. The really lacey leaf one could be one called delfino., which is the way it grows. I don't see any flowers on it, so I am thinking it isn't the regular flat leaf varieties we normally see.
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Old June 13, 2014   #26
Ken B
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I love cilantro, but like ddsack said, it needs succession planting in the summer. It tends to have dormancy issues in hot soil, so when we're trying to get it started, we'll do all sorts of tricks to keep it cooler -- put the seed in the freezer for a few days, sow it in the evening and water it in with cold water, sow it in the shade... Usually what we'll do to keep the soil cooler is to cover the soil with burlap, cardboard, etc. and keep that on for 5-7 days until the cilantro starts to emerge (have to keep an eye on this -- since grasshoppers and other bugs love hanging out underneath the cardboard etc. in order to keep cool themselves, they'll eat the tender sprouts if the cardboard stays in place too long!)
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Old June 13, 2014   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enchant View Post
Last summer, I discovered a recipe that made the best salsa I've had since I did a lot of traveling in the southwest. It calls for a LOT of cilantro, which really makes it. I decided that this year, I'd try growing my own cilantro.

I'd never done it before, so I *knew* there was limited chance for success. I bought some seeds from Johnnyseeds and planted a few back in March. By time most of my tomatoes a other veggies were starting to see some serious height, these were still only a single spindly stalk with one leaf that couldn't even support its own weight. Ok, live and learn. I'd do better next year.

I still wanted to grow some cilantro, so at the beginning of May, I bought some from a local nursery - a 4" pot with a healthy bunch growing. In mid-may, I planted both the nursery-bought and my original seedlings.

The seedlings are now growing like gangbusters with very healthy leaves, some over an inch across. The nursery plant looked good for a couple weeks, but now, I think it's bolting. I have what I believe others have called the lacy leaves.

Is there something I could have done to prevent this? Should I pick off this lacy stuff? Will normal leaves grow back in their place? On that nursery plant, I pinched some of the wide leaves at the lower level, and they smell as I'd expect. The lacy stuff smells similar, but definitely not the same. I don't know if I want to ruin a batch of salsa with it.

Next year, I'll definitely plant more seeds, because these are looking great - better than anything I've found in a supermarket.




I think cilantro stresses more easily in a pot than nurseries care for you to consider, and stress leads to bolting. But I've had some success, or luck, with it transplanted from a pot.

We had several 0° nights last winter and my direct sow and self-seed plants made it through with just a light Agribon cover. It came on strong in early spring. At this point it is flowering and setting seeds. I don't mind the lacy foliage so much, so maybe I'll have something when tomato season rolls in. I did freeze some in olive oil -makes a great salad dressing.
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Old August 19, 2015   #28
encore
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what's the best way to store cilantro for use later? freeze it or dry in dehydrator? tom
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Old August 19, 2015   #29
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Blanch and freeze in blocks like spinach.

Think plastic ice tray.
After it freezes pop them out and seal in bags individually.

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