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Old November 14, 2014   #46
Cole_Robbie
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Halide and LED are the wrong color temperature.
Well, so are HPS lights, and I have grown some nice pepper seedlings under them. Some things are wrong, but still work well.

Different bulb manufacturers like Hortilux and Optilume make HID bulbs that tinker with the spectrum, trying to optimize it for plants. High-intensity lights have power on their side - even if they are inefficient, they still get the job done well.
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Old November 14, 2014   #47
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... Better LED lights are now made that have what is needed. ...
There are no LED systems with the correct color temperature or delivered wattage for fruiting plants -- although some are appropriate for plants native to low light areas and a few commercial systems for production of baby greens. These latter ones you won't find for sale on the internet -- they are sold through large brick-and-mortar agricultural supply companies.
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Old November 14, 2014   #48
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6500 K is just the light spectrum (The blue spectrum), ...
No, it is a lot more than blue. It is a complete spectrum at the "black body" temperature of 6500 Kelvin. Try not to get confused by the lingo of marketeers.
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Old November 14, 2014   #49
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...High-intensity lights have power on their side ...
Most of that power (your electric bill) is wasted on spectrum that plants can't use for photosynthesis. And in many situations they put out too much heat to the point that you spend even more money operating a fan.
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Old December 14, 2014   #50
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I'm looking to try a few different basils indoors over the winter. As posted above, my basils succumbed to downy mildew late last summer. Elenora has been hard to find in stock.

Is it Blue Spice that tastes terrible or African Blue, or are they one and the same?
It may give downy mildew a fight under the right conditions.

http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/...mildew-pub.pdf

- Lisa
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Old December 14, 2014   #51
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Thanks for the tip about Downy Mildew. When I grow some out this spring I will soak seeds in hydrogen peroxide solution and then water with actinovate. IMHO seeds or plants will carry the vector in the temperate zones.
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Old December 14, 2014   #52
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Is it Blue Spice that tastes terrible or African Blue, or are they one and the same?
Blue Spice and African Blue are very different plants. Blue Spice is a SE Asian type and only grows as an annual here in zone 10b. IMO it has a wonderful scent (different from Italian Basil scent). In contrast, African Blue is a woody perennial even in zone 9b. It is a chance hybrid of two north African types. It is self-sterile so don't be duped into buying it from seed. It has small leaves, but the oil concentration is about 10x that of Italian. Consequently you would get an awful result using it 1-for-1 as a replacement for Italian. On the otherhand, if you are a thoughtful cook no one will know the difference. I grow this plant year-round on my patio in a 17" pot.
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Old December 15, 2014   #53
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Thanks for the tip about Downy Mildew. When I grow some out this spring I will soak seeds in hydrogen peroxide solution and then water with actinovate. IMHO seeds or plants will carry the vector in the temperate zones.
I find basil objects to weather. It prefers a sheltered spot and to keep the foliage dry. I grow mine in my greenhouse in soiless mix in large hanging baskets as I find it does poorly in real soil in the garden due to it's susceptibility to fungus problems. grows well there.
KarenO

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Old December 15, 2014   #54
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Yeah African Blue sounds good! Another herb that looks really interesting is foxtail Rosemary, cool looking!
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Old December 15, 2014   #55
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... I find basil objects to weather. ...
Basils do not come from one climate zone. There are several species, ranging from tropical to subtropical. The greek and the "african" types are from higher subtropical altitudes in NE Africa. Italian basil is thought to have been originally imported from Reunion Island. Several of the "asian" types are from the near-tropics. There is great variety and I don't think that one cultivation method applies to them all.
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Old December 15, 2014   #56
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Agreed. I refer to regular Genovese or sweet basil. Grown far from its dry warm Mediterranean homeland. In northern Canada.
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Old December 15, 2014   #57
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Agreed. I refer to regular Genovese or sweet basil. Grown far from its dry warm Mediterranean homeland. In northern Canada.
KO
Its homeland is in the tropics out in the middle of the Indian Ocean. It is a relative newcomer to the Mediterranean. And I agree, it's really far from home in Canada!
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Old December 15, 2014   #58
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You could try the hybrid basils.
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Old December 15, 2014   #59
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Blue Spice and African Blue are very different plants. Blue Spice is a SE Asian type and only grows as an annual here in zone 10b. IMO it has a wonderful scent (different from Italian Basil scent). In contrast, African Blue is a woody perennial even in zone 9b. It is a chance hybrid of two north African types. It is self-sterile so don't be duped into buying it from seed. It has small leaves, but the oil concentration is about 10x that of Italian. Consequently you would get an awful result using it 1-for-1 as a replacement for Italian. On the otherhand, if you are a thoughtful cook no one will know the difference. I grow this plant year-round on my patio in a 17" pot.
I love blue spice, but it is strong. Don't need much.
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Old December 15, 2014   #60
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I also like the lettuce leaf basil and mammoth basil too...the large leaves are nice for pesto making.
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