Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating onions, garlic, shallots and leeks.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 26, 2016   #31
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 3,084
Default

I compost mine.
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 26, 2016   #32
KC.Sun
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: 6a
Posts: 322
Default

I had then stir fried and with an egg omelet this year. Just wish I had more.
KC.Sun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 26, 2016   #33
joseph
Tomatovillian™
 
joseph's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Cache Valley, N/E of The Great Salt Lake
Posts: 1,171
Default

I allow my scapes to remain on the plant. As a plant breeder, the scape, and associated seeds, are the most important part of the garlic that I grow....

At market, people ask me "what do you do with garlic scapes?" There is only one answer that's always just begging to be said, "I sell them at the farmer's market!!!". However in response to "How are they used?" I usually reply, "Use them just like you would use garlic: add them to a soup, stir-fry, roast, omelet, or casserole. Or blend them up with some olive oil and vinegar to make a pesto.".

I used some last night in a pesto, and added some to a spinach stir-fry.
joseph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 27, 2016   #34
matereater
Tomatovillian™
 
matereater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: S.E. Michigan (Livonia)
Posts: 1,058
Default

How much of the scape is used ? from the bud to the end or cut lower and use it all ? I cut some yesterday about a foot below the bulb and it seemed somewhat hard almost stick like, dont think that part would cool up very well.
__________________
Steve

Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult
matereater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 27, 2016   #35
TomNJ
Tomatovillian™
 
TomNJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Floyd VA
Posts: 644
Default

If you let the scapes get too long they will get woody. You should snap them when they are about 12-18" and are still tender and fully edible. If you harvested yours late then just eat the tender portions.

TomNJVA
TomNJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 27, 2016   #36
Father'sDaughter
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MA/NH Border
Posts: 4,284
Default

Yes, like asparagus, they will snap where the tough woody part meets the tender edible part. It's easier if you harvest them by snapping rather than cutting as then the woody part stays behind on the plant.
Father'sDaughter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 14, 2016   #37
SueCT
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 451
Default

Do scapes need to be blanched before freezing or do you just wash, dry and cut them?
SueCT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 14, 2016   #38
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 31,219
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SueCT View Post
Do scapes need to be blanched before freezing or do you just wash, dry and cut them?
I think everything needs to be blanched before freezing it helps preserve freshness by killing it and other stuff on it.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 14, 2016   #39
PhilaGardener
Tomatovillian™
 
PhilaGardener's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 1,347
Default

Well, I just bag and freeze some and they seem to be just fine!
((Probably not officially sanctioned, however!))

Last edited by PhilaGardener; July 14, 2016 at 08:34 PM.
PhilaGardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 16, 2017   #40
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,382
Default

I have chopped and frozen without blanching, but they didn't keep all winter that way. Good for a month or two.

Right now I am eating the fresh ones diced into a curry. Decidedly crunchy.

I'm wondering about pickles since I harvested most of my porcelain scapes today. I think I would like a salty rather than a sweet pickle...
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 16, 2017   #41
Father'sDaughter
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MA/NH Border
Posts: 4,284
Default

All mine are made into pesto and frozen in one cup portions. It's good on pasta, with sautéed shrimp, spread on bruschetta, smeared on a pizza crust in place of sauce, and makes a really good dip when mixed with sour cream and a bit of lemon juice.

I use this recipe but I use toasted walnuts instead of almonds - http://doriegreenspan.com/recipe/garlic-scape-pesto/
Father'sDaughter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 16, 2017   #42
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,382
Default

Thanks! It's nice to have a recipe to start with instead of wingin it.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 16, 2017   #43
gorbelly
Tomatovillian™
 
gorbelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,008
Default

They're terrific in kimchi.
gorbelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 17, 2017   #44
oakley
Tomatovillian™
 
oakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NewYork 5a
Posts: 1,612
Default

I've had a good garlic year. Better than I can remember. Probably giving them the
bean/pea bed this year. Crop rotation.

Caught them before bolting and getting woody. I often miss that window of tender as
just a couple warm sunny days can force them fast.

Pesto, I used pecans.

Sauteed leeks and mushroom, added chopped scapes at the end with pan off the heat.
-froze that for later.

Fridge pickled a load. 2 big quarts, 2 pints I froze.

I fridge pickle year round at least twice a month and more in the summer. From all
harvest. Always something to pickle. (I'll pull up my recipe if anyone wants it)

I found a lost bag in the crisper drawer that was a couple weeks old. Still fresh and
tender...I thought it might go woody but I did pick very early this year.
oakley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 17, 2017   #45
Salaam
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ottawa, ON
Posts: 98
Default

We use them in place of green onions or even onions, in things like tomato sauce.
Salaam is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:18 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★