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Old July 13, 2015   #1
Elliot
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Default What are the easiest roses to grow?

what are the easiest roses to grow?
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Old July 13, 2015   #2
pauldavid
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All the roses are fairly easly to get started but finding the most disease resistant varieties for your area is the most important thing.
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Old July 13, 2015   #3
Worth1
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Double Knock out and Knockout are by far is the best for Texas and just about any other place.
Is is one of the best standard roses on the market.

Here is a picture of Knockout and yes I see them like this all of the time.
I need to plant some.

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Old July 14, 2015   #4
Elliot
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Default knock out roses

I had a knock out rose bush and gardener destroyed it. I am now in a new one
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Old July 14, 2015   #5
SueCT
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Yup, Knockout is the most fail proof.
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Old July 15, 2015   #6
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Not sure what your looking for but rosa rugosa is like a weed here.
Also called beach rose. Pretty in a not in your face kind of way.
Indestructable. When the earth is nothing but a charred cinder, there will be cockroaches, bindweed, and rugosa roses.
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Old July 15, 2015   #7
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I have a lot of Sunny Knockout (yellow) and Pink Knockout and they are very easy if you can keep the Japanese beetles off. I also have carpet roses that do very well--pink is Sweet Drift and white is Icy Drift. The Sweet Drift is twice the size of Icy but still small. I have them cut back each winter like regular roses.
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Old July 15, 2015   #8
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I do have some climbing roses, too. Lady Banks Yellow, but those are a lot harder to take care of. Pretty big.
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Old July 15, 2015   #9
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My grandma used to have climbing roses. The flowers were not big but did look like a carpet hung on the side of the house.
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Old July 20, 2015   #10
TexasTycoon
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I second the knockout suggestion. If apartment landscapers use them, you can bet they're easy to grow. Prolific bloomers, too.

A house I used to rent had the most gorgeous climbing red roses but I never figured out the variety. They were also easy to grow, but hard to keep control of as they frequently grew past the roofline. Prune your roses in February and they'll love you for it.
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Old October 6, 2015   #11
BackyardFarm
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I third (...fourth?) the recommendation for KnockOut Roses. I bought a Cherry/Rose Pink KnockOut Rose on clearance last month and it looked pitiful. One month in the ground and it's doubled in size and the blooms are gorgeous.

Those things are foolproof!
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Old October 6, 2015   #12
Carriehelene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BackyardFarm View Post
I third (...fourth?) the recommendation for KnockOut Roses. I bought a Cherry/Rose Pink KnockOut Rose on clearance last month and it looked pitiful. One month in the ground and it's doubled in size and the blooms are gorgeous.

Those things are foolproof!
Wait and see if it survives your winters. Our last 2 winters here in upstate NY destroyed roses that were zoned 4, forget 5's and up. Rugosas came thru like champs though. Knockouts, like Austins, whimpered and keeled over. I've never had to do a thing to my rugosas, and they've been there for 10 years.
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Old October 6, 2015   #13
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If you can find them the Ingrid Bergman is perfect. We planted 15 about 20 years ago and they are still going strong. We also planted 20 climbing roses and they are doing well also. Every Feb we prune them and mix in Alfalfa pellets and fertilize with BAYER Rose fertilizer. Works for us
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Old October 6, 2015   #14
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Since you're in the north, I would recommend the Explorer series, which are hardy. There's also the Morden series (developed in Manitoba). I have climbing roses, probably William Baffin, which are as hard as nails. As somebody else mentioned, the Rugosa roses are also very hardy. For small rose bushes, Drift roses are also supposed to be hardy and carefree.

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Old October 6, 2015   #15
clkeiper
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I have 3 knock out roses my MIL thought I needed. this is the second year thy have been in and I am not as impressed with them as I think I ought to be.I had one flush of blooms this summer and then nothing the rest of the season. I will say it was very dry here and I am sure that contributed to the dearth of blooms, but I would have thought they would have done better. Hopefully next year they will be nicer.
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