Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating peppers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 18, 2016   #1
encore
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 359
Default marconi peppers

just wondering if the giant marconi (pretty much all sweet peppers) do they all pretty much taste the same, kinda like a bell pepper taste,? thanks----tom
encore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #2
pmcgrady
Tomatovillian™
 
pmcgrady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 1,010
Default

To me marconis taste more like a sweet pepper than a bell pepper, more like a gypsy pepper.
pmcgrady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #3
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,040
Default

It's a sweet pepper as long as you let them turn fully red.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #4
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,429
Default

I find that the varieties I have tried tend to vary not much in regard to flavor, but more about traits like size, wall thickness, and water content. The Marconi is a frying pepper, anyway, so the one you like the most may depend on what you're frying with it.

I like Corno di Toro red & yellow. They make a nice pair in the garden. Giant Marconi is ok, but I find the walls of it to be a little thinner.
Cole_Robbie is online now   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #5
encore
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 359
Default

so would they be good raw in salads?---stuffed and baked?---or chopped up in salsa (fresh and canned)? thanks----tom
encore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #6
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,429
Default

They're not bad raw. The lower water content makes them hold up better when cooked, compared to bells.
Cole_Robbie is online now   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #7
RayR
Tomatovillian™
 
RayR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Cheektowaga, NY
Posts: 2,370
Default

I like the Marconi peppers but Corno di Toro is much more productive for me and produce earlier.
RayR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #8
Deborah
Riding The Crazy Train Again
 
Deborah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Marcos, California
Posts: 2,562
Default

Encore, by tasting like a bell pepper, do you mean a typical green one? I always assumed that the reds and other colors would have that green bell pepper taste. Then one day I bought a red one and fried it and poured it over a chicken breast. I couldn't believe how sweet-savory and good the red one was. Now I never buy the greens. If I could I'd grow Lipstick and Carmin.
__________________
"The righteous one cares for the needs of his animal". Proverbs 12:10
Deborah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2016   #9
whistech
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Between The Woodlands and Spring, Texas
Posts: 480
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deborah View Post
Encore, by tasting like a bell pepper, do you mean a typical green one? I always assumed that the reds and other colors would have that green bell pepper taste. Then one day I bought a red one and fried it and poured it over a chicken breast. I couldn't believe how sweet-savory and good the red one was. Now I never buy the greens. If I could I'd grow Lipstick and Carmin.
I agree Deborah, I have only bought orange or red bell peppers for a few years now. When they are on sale, I eat at least one every day. I always put red bell pepper in my pasta sauce. It gives the sauce an extra flavor.
__________________
Arlie
whistech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2016   #10
encore
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 359
Default

yes the green ones, I grew green-red-yellow- and orange bells last year, so was wondering, what Marconi tasted like green and red.----tom (grew all the colors to make my salsa look nicer lol but they took too long to change colors, )----tom
encore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2016   #11
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,040
Default

The giant Marconi I grew years ago seemed to take a long time to ripen. Once it is
fully grown, and the green starts to lighten, you can add 3 more weeks for it to turn
red.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2016   #12
seaeagle
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: virginia
Posts: 404
Default

King Arthur Hybrid is the only pepper I grow.It tastes good, goes from green to red easier than any other variety I ever tried.Just as productive as any bell pepper you will grow and it is also very early (I started seeds March 1st and got the first pepper on June 18th and more soon after that.) I picked the last 6 a week before Christmas without covering or anything.But it was unusually warm last fall.The seeds are kind of expensive but worth it IMO

Tried Giant Marconi once, not all that impressed with it.

Last edited by seaeagle; February 19, 2016 at 04:34 PM.
seaeagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 4, 2017   #13
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,511
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
I find that the varieties I have tried tend to vary not much in regard to flavor, but more about traits like size, wall thickness, and water content. The Marconi is a frying pepper, anyway, so the one you like the most may depend on what you're frying with it.

I like Corno di Toro red & yellow. They make a nice pair in the garden. Giant Marconi is ok, but I find the walls of it to be a little thinner.

C_R, was the giant marconi you tried the AAS 2001 Giant Marconi hybrid pepper? I've grown super sized marconi peppers but I''m not certain of they were the true hybrid variety. It wouldn't surprise me that you didn't like the taste if they weren't the totally wonderful op version.

I was searching a few sites tonight and the majority of sellers that carry the AAS hybrid version are selling treated seeds. I wonder whey this variety is almost always treated. Any thoughts?

- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 4, 2017   #14
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,429
Default

It was in a family garden. I think the seed came from Johnny's. The peppers were huge and it was a good producer. Although bells are the worst about being difficult, our other peppers still vary a lot with the weather each year, so one year might not be enough to judge it fairly.
Cole_Robbie is online now   Reply With Quote
Old February 4, 2017   #15
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 1,511
Default

I don't see it at Johnny's, so maybe I'll try a single plant if I see it at a local retail outlet. It'll be my "splurge" since we don't have to chase after Sungold anymore.

- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:40 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★