Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating fruit-bearing plants, trees, flowers and ornamental plants.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 8, 2016   #1
marc108
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: california
Posts: 40
Default Chlorosis that wont quit, what to do?

So far I've given this eureka lemon 3 foliar and 2 in-ground applications of GreenAll Chelated Iron ( 2.00% Urea Nitrogen, 0.10% Copper, 2.5% Iron, 1.00% Manganese, and 2.00% Zinc, all EDTA chelates) over the past 6 weeks or so with no change.

Should I just keep going or is there something I'm missing?

Thanks
Attached Images
File Type: jpg lemon.jpg (338.8 KB, 116 views)
File Type: jpg lemon2.jpg (184.5 KB, 115 views)
marc108 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8, 2016   #2
KarenO
Tomatovillian™
 
KarenO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 3,487
Default

a soil test may be in order. Moisture and pH can greatly affect a plant's ability to absorb and utilize available nutrients
KarenO
KarenO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8, 2016   #3
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 28,610
Default

It looks like a brand new planting and below the soil level.
And the top roots are showing.
Is it getting watered enough?

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old March 8, 2016   #4
RayR
Tomatovillian™
 
RayR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Cheektowaga, NY
Posts: 2,295
Default

Don't know much about lemon trees but EDTA has a limited PH range where it is effective, up to 6.0-6.2 I've read.
RayR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8, 2016   #5
marc108
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: california
Posts: 40
Default

pH is 7 or slightly under. It's a new transplant, been in the ground 6 or 7 weeks now. It actually came from the grower with that chlorosis. Getting watered properly at home.

Ground pH shouldn't be a limiting factor when using foliar sprays right?
marc108 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8, 2016   #6
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 28,610
Default

I'm backing out I dont believe in foliar sprays.
My citrus is in sorry red clay soil I dont fertilize and it seems to grow even though I gave up on it for the time being.
If the root ball is below the surrounding soil it needs to be brought up level and the roots need to be covered.
Figs are the only tree I know of that likes to be planted below the soil level and covered up.

Get rid of the grass around the tree about 3 feet out and level the soil out to the root ball and make a water saucer.
Fill this water saucer up at least once a week until it stops draining more if it is hot and dry.
Mulch.
Put your nutrients in the soil and the tree will grow like a weed.
I have planted untold 100's of trees some with root ball 6 feet in diameter.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old March 8, 2016   #7
marc108
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: california
Posts: 40
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
...

I've opened up the area underneath the tree to a about 4ft. the tree only has its crown roots showing right now. it also has a few pounds of citrus tone on it. has a water saucer. gets a deep watering once per week.

This is why I'm so lost! It's even budding wonderfully.
marc108 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8, 2016   #8
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 28,610
Default

Just give it time to get established I think it will be fine.
Just domne water log it.
Sometimes mine leaves droop before they get watered but they have been around for awhile.
The deer keep eating them back.
Growing in containers sucks for trees.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old March 9, 2016   #9
peebee
Tomatovillian™
 
peebee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Southern CA
Posts: 1,343
Default

Since it is planted in the lawn (or looks like it), it's not getting watered additionally from any sprinklers is it?
peebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9, 2016   #10
marc108
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: california
Posts: 40
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peebee View Post
Since it is planted in the lawn (or looks like it), it's not getting watered additionally from any sprinklers is it?
nope. I don't turn that section on.
marc108 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9, 2016   #11
dustdevil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: WI, USA Zone4
Posts: 1,813
Default

PH of 7 is too high. You need to add sulphur(sulfur) to the soil.

Eureka Lemon pH Range: 5.5 to 6.5

http://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/pda_b0f9.html

http://forums.gardenweb.com/discussi...tree-repotting

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/soil-le...ant-60135.html
dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9, 2016   #12
dustdevil
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: WI, USA Zone4
Posts: 1,813
Default

PS: You probably should have planted in a soil that was around 50% peat moss. You need to measure your pH every few months, so you can keep your soil around the tree in the desired range. I would strip back the grass further(Worth mentioned) and possibly consider a thin layer of acidic mulch. You should have transplanted your lemon to the level it was growing at in the pot. It definitely needs more soil over those exposed roots...you planted slightly too low.
dustdevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9, 2016   #13
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 28,610
Default

To add to that your water could be a high pH a constant battle for me.

Worth
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...78JrY-26T2xCRA
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
Worth1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old May 15, 2016   #14
MarianneW
Tomatovillian™
 
MarianneW's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Arizona
Posts: 153
Default

I know I'm late to the party, but your tree is stressed from transplanting and all of your attentions. The leaves look fine, it's busy trying to overcome the trauma of being dragged around and then yanked out of its pot & stuck somewhere else. It looks exactly like it should. Stop with the fussing, do not add peat moss, and stop with the foliar spray and don't worry about any ph stuff.

What you need to do is download the citrus care calendar from your local citrus station and follow their directions. Do exactly what they say, when they say to and nothing extra. Your results will be best on your block.
MarianneW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:33 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★