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Old April 22, 2016   #1
ContainerTed
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Default Zavory Habanero - No Heat

Back in 2009, I grew this pepper from seed and it had absolutely no heat. I am a pepper wimp (self professed), and was surprised that I could enjoy the Habanero taste without the pain.

The seeds have been stored since mid-season in 2009 and I was hoping that I might be able to wake up a couple. So, I turned on the heat and did a pre-soak in MG organic nitrogen only fert.

Here's the results. Now to see if I can get one of them to the fruiting stage.
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File Type: jpg ZavHab2.JPG (54.8 KB, 219 views)
File Type: jpg ZavoryHab1.JPG (53.5 KB, 217 views)
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Old April 22, 2016   #2
MI Dawn
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I also really like this pepper. I make a Habanero Gold jam that uses both bell and habanero peppers. I can sub out the bells for this variety and another one - Trinidad Perfume - which also has no heat. Using them increases the habanero flavor without the heat. Works also in salsa to increase flavor without the heat. I think my Trinidad was a little more productive than Zavory.

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Old April 22, 2016   #3
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I didn't care for it myself (Zavory), it wasn't productive here and the taste was bland to me.
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Old April 23, 2016   #4
dmforcier
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Ted, is the first pic where you are now?

They look fine. Let them develop at least two sets of true leaves before you separate and up-pot. Don't fertilize yet or over-water (they look a smidge damp in the pic) and you should have some nice pods.

You say the seeds are from 2009? How was the germination rate?
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Old April 23, 2016   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmforcier View Post
Ted, is the first pic where you are now?

They look fine. Let them develop at least two sets of true leaves before you separate and up-pot. Don't fertilize yet or over-water (they look a smidge damp in the pic) and you should have some nice pods.

You say the seeds are from 2009? How was the germination rate?
Gee Ted, I bet you didn't know all that, huh?
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Old April 23, 2016   #6
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Marsha -


dmforcier - The picture of the seedlings was taken yesterday afternoon. The germination rate so far is 2 seedlings out of about 50 plus seeds. The seeds were harvested in 2009 and kept in an old medicine bottle until this year. When I moved from North Georgia to here in Northeast Tennessee, my entire pepper seed collection at the time was subjected to 20 degree freezing temps overnight. For the most part, I put them aside and, in my mind, just wrote them off. But, for some reason I didn't dispose of them.

So, this year I'm doing another "cleanup" of older seeds and decided to give this one a try because I haven't seen it anywhere else. It would be a shame to let it become another lost variety. So, I decided to give it a try. I've been known for waking up some older tomato seeds, and hoped my methods would work here. I really expected nothing, but hoped for success.

And, rest assured that I'll move these to individual cups/pots when the time is appropriate.
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Old April 23, 2016   #7
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Hi
I am growing Zavory's this season-I think that the plants are wonderful! They aren't big enough to transplant yet-but I sure think they are great so far-very pretty.
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I see you had some nice peppers-did you like them?
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Old April 23, 2016   #8
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Glad to see that you got a result. I would suspect the age more than the freezing for the low germination rate. (Both effects are dependent on the level of residual moisture in the seeds.)


I'm having a very similar situation with my C.pubescens this year. 1 out of 45 sprouts, and I just discovered a second tiny volunteer. Even this small level of success feels like .. victory!
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Old April 23, 2016   #9
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I've grown it a few times and enjoy it. Really prolific for me, and completely mild hab like flavor. I pickled a bunch last year.
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Old April 24, 2016   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hunt-Grow-Cook View Post
I've grown it a few times and enjoy it. Really prolific for me, and completely mild hab like flavor. I pickled a bunch last year.
I am really enjoying growing Zavory's so far. My plants are just little right now-but really nice-leafy and green. I hope I get some peppers
.
Wow! it took awhile for my slow dial up to let me see your photo's! But stunning! You plants were not only gorgeous and healthy looking-but loaded with peppers too! I am kinda jealous here Just beautiful:clap:

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Old April 24, 2016   #11
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Wow, I didn't know there was a sweet habanero! Where do I sign up? Lol, one more to add to my to grow list, along with trinidad perfume. Amazon has both types of seeds, so looks like I'll be adding on to my next order, lol.

Ted, it's great that you have 2 growing, hopefully they will do well, and you can save lots of seed!
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Old April 24, 2016   #12
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So, I am thinking mix one of them with a bunch of regular Habs. Challenge one of my bravado friends to "who can each one whole" contest, and grab the this one first. Must be the little boy in me.
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Old April 27, 2016   #13
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Great! Didn't know there was a sweet hab either. Definitely gotta add to my list of ones to get.

Does it stay sweet with no heat even with it is fully ripe? I've had a few types of peppers that were supposed to be sweet and when they turned bright red they had heat.
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Old April 27, 2016   #14
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It's not a function of the degree of ripeness (past a certain point - new pods are often without heat). A ripe pod often has a slight drop in heat. Rather, pods are not uniform in heat level on the same plant. You can eat one that seems mild, then the next pod will scorch your moustache. Natural variation.
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Old April 27, 2016   #15
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I have Trinidad Perfume for the first time this year. From what I understand, it is a heatless hab.
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