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Old May 15, 2016   #1
Durgan
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Default Garlic-Life cycle to date

http://durgan.org/2016/May%202016/15...20Garlic/HTML/ 15 May 2016 Garlic
Garlic, cloves, rounds and bulbils are all thriving. I expect a good harvest.



http://durgan.org/2016/April%202016/...20Garlic/HTML/ 16 April 2016 Garlic
Garlic growth to date. The large plants are normal planted cloves. The one smaller plant row is first year rounds. The small grass looking row is garlic seeds,bulbils. All are growing very well.


http://durgan.org/2016/March%202016/...20Garlic/HTML/ 12 March 2016 Garlic
Garlic is growing. There is still no sign of the row of bulbils, but the first year round are all up.



http://www.durgan.org/2015/October%2...20Garlic/HTML/ 19 October 2015 Planting Garlic


Garlic was planted to be harvested in July 2016. A row of bulbils was planted at about 2 inch spacing, a row of rounds planted at 4 inch spacing and five rows (80 cloves) was planted at 6 inch spacing. The garlic is from the 2015 harvest. The 8 foot square bed was prepared about a month ago and heavily mulched to retain moisture. Boards were placed to mark the rows. Garlic has no difficulty pushing through the mulch in the Spring. The bulbils will produce rounds in 2016 and the rounds now planted will produce about three normal sized cloves in 2016.Planting the bulbils and rounds will eventually become the cloves for normal planting. This allows more bulbs for use, since none will be used for seed.
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Old May 15, 2016   #2
Labradors2
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Looking good Durgan! My garlic survived the mild winter, despite the fact that my much (mostly twig and leaf debris) didn't hold out until spring.

Linda
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Old May 23, 2016   #3
Ozark
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Very nice, Durgan! I'm growing garlic for the first time. Friends gave me some starts last fall of a strain that has been grown in gardens on their family farm here since the 1890's or earlier. I planted them, and now I have a small patch of plants that look a lot like those larger ones of yours.

I've determined that I've got some variety of hard neck garlic, they're growing scapes now. I pulled one bulb early and we ate it chopped up in a salad - cloves hadn't formed yet and the bulb was all-white with no trace of red or purple. It had a very pleasant, mild garlic flavor.

There are so many different kinds of hard neck garlic, I wonder what variety this old one is. Does anyone here know what garlic variety might have been commonly grown by farm folks here in the Missouri Ozarks in the 19th Century? It probably wasn't bought or ordered, but shared by a neighbor or relative as that was usual practice at the time.
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Old May 23, 2016   #4
Durgan
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Most garlic is very similar. If you have a good crop perpetuate that. There is never any new breeds of garlic since all crossing is impossible because the seeds are sterile. They produce but perfect clones of the parent. Go to a garlic festival and look around. Almost all garlic is the same. Some is a little different in size but this is normal depending upon growing conditions. Rhetoric looks after the rest.
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Old May 23, 2016   #5
Durgan
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http://www.durgan.org/URL/?TQZWH Garlic, the sweet breath of life!
An Overview of the five varieties and 17 sub-varieties of Garlic.

Botanists classify all true garlics under the species Allium Sativum. There are two subspecies; Ophioscorodon , or hard-necked garlics (Ophios for short) and Sativum , or soft-necked garlics.
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Old May 28, 2016   #6
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I harvested the first of my hardneck garlic yesterday here near Seattle. Spanish Roja. Some never made scapes but bulb size was 1.75-2" which is very good for me as this has always been my earliest and smallest hardneck. Has anyone else ever had hardnecks that didn't scape? The Romanian red next to these plants are scaping normally.
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Old May 28, 2016   #7
Labradors2
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I'm not a garlic expert, so please forgive me if this is a stupid question. Did your garlic leaves just die without sending up scapes? We usually harvest in mid-July, but we are in the north. I am wondering if you waited long enough.....

Linda
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Old May 28, 2016   #8
jmsieglaff
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I wondered the same as Linda. WA is a similar latitude as us in WI, although I know interior parts are hotter and more desert like. My hardnecks (I grow Chesnok red) scape every year right around June 15.
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Old May 28, 2016   #9
ilex
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I picked my garlic 3 weeks ago.
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Old May 28, 2016   #10
Kazedwards
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My best guess is that daylight hours are what cause garlic to scape. Similar to onions bulbing. It would also make sense because strong plants and weak plants scape at the same time. Some years garlic will come up a month sooner than normal other years it will be late, but it will always scape at the same time for that variety. I just noticed today that my plants are starting to grow scapes.

Most garlic is very similar but there can be a lot of contrast too. Cultural practices still affect it over time. It similar to having different strains of the same tomato, like Brandywine. There are new breeds of garlic. Seed companies do not work with garlic due to the difficulty of breeding it, but home growers, like myself do. I have several new garlics growing now. Two of them are in the garden from last year. I have 20 or so in the garage under lights right now as well. Of the ones under lights I might get 5 strong plants. I had sowed 500 seeds and that is what I got. So seeds and seedlings can have a lot of problems making it new garlic a rarity.

Here is a good source to learn more about true garlic seed.
http://www.ivansnewgarlics.com
He also sells garlic he has bred.


-Zach
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Old May 28, 2016   #11
pmcgrady
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labradors2 View Post
I'm not a garlic expert, so please forgive me if this is a stupid question. Did your garlic leaves just die without sending up scapes? We usually harvest in mid-July, but we are in the north. I am wondering if you waited long enough.....

Linda
Depends on if it's hard neck, or soft neck garlic...
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Old May 28, 2016   #12
greenthumbomaha
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Its a great year for garlic here too, but in Durgan's rich soil the crop is much more robust than mine. Mine is starting to scape in a few varieties. Does anyone have plants to succession crop in their garlic bed after harvest? I'm going to plant beets, and later peas. It might be too hot for peas but last year the peas didn't have time to produce anything but greens. I might put a squash transplant in there too.

- Lisa

Last edited by greenthumbomaha; May 28, 2016 at 07:07 PM.
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Old May 28, 2016   #13
jmsieglaff
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I do bush beans after my spinach and broccoli. And lettuce and radishes after my onions and garlic.
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Old May 28, 2016   #14
Nadoniac
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I harvested because the ones that did scape started scaping on May 3rd and all but five leaves were brown and dry. I pulled one and the bulb looked good so i harvested the rest. Of 16 spanish roja only about 8 scaped. Just seemed very odd to me.
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Old May 28, 2016   #15
Nadoniac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
Its a great year for garlic here too, but in Durgan's rich soil the crop is much more robust than mine. Mine is starting to scape in a few varieties. Does anyone have plants to succession crop in their garlic bed after harvest? I'm going to plant beets, and later peas. It might be too hot for peas but last year the peas didn't have time to produce anything but greens. I might put a squash transplant in there too.

- Lisa
I always grow bush beans after garlic that i start in seed starting trays so they are ready to go right after getting the last garlic out.
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